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first_img Categories: Politics Tags: 2020 U.S. Presidential Election « Deep State Target Interview – Part II Mueller Withheld Evidence Which Calls into Question His Entire Investigation »center_img QUESTION: Would you care to comment on the Democratic debate?EHANSWER:  There was really nothing to comment on. The polls show Joe is at about 41%. The traditional Democrats will never vote for Bernie or Elizabeth Warren. The Millenials are the big supporters of Bernie. The Democrats are not yet ready for prime-time. There is no person to stand up against the system. Joe used his position to get his son in Ukraine and even blackmailed the government. He is part of the Hillary saga and the White House would be up for the highest bidder.Trump spoke a good game about draining the swamp. But he is still standing in the middle of it and has not drained anything as of yet.last_img read more

first_img10:30 a.m. UPDATE: The man who drowned has been identified as Ronald J. Ripper, whom apparently lives in Monitor according to the Chelan County Coroner Wayne Harris. He lists the cause of death as “Asphyxia due to Fresh Water Drowning. Manner of death is Accident.”Here’s the original story:A 45-year-old Monitor man drowned in the Wenatchee River trying to save a pet pig Sunday evening. The Chelan County Sheriff’s Office says the unidentified man was floating on the river with his adult son and pet pig around 6:00 p.m. between Monitor and Sleepy Hollow Bridge. At some point the pig fell into the river and the man jumped into save it but struggled to stay afloat. Witnesses were able to locate the pig and bring it to shore, but did not find the man. Deputies located him near Sleepy Hollow Bridge, pulled him to shore and began CPR. After approximately 20 minutes, he was pronounced dead. His identity is being withheld pending notification of next of kin. Here’s the full release from CCSO:Sheriff Brian Burnett reports a 45-year-old Monitor, WA resident drowned in the Wenatchee River Sunday evening.The male subject had been floating the river with his adult son and his pet pig near Monitor at about 6:00pm. Each were on their own floatation tube. According to witnesses, the subjects were around the halfway point between Monitor and the Sleepy Hollow Bridge when the pig fell into the river. The 45-year-old male jumped into the river in an attempt to rescue the pig, but was seen struggling to stay afloat.The subject’s son yelled to other people recreating on the river and the shoreline that his father had disappeared under water. Witnesses were able to locate the pig and take it to shore. The missing subject was eventually located by Chelan County deputies downstream near the Sleepy Hollow Bridge. Deputies entered the river and pulled him to the shore. CPR was initiated as personnel from Chelan County Fire District #1 and Ballard Ambulance arrived on scene and continued lifesaving efforts. After approximately twenty minutes, the subject was pronounced dead at the scene.The identity of the deceased is being withheld until all family notifications have been made.last_img read more

first_img Source:http://www.oncotarget.com/news/pr/onc201-kills-breast-cancer-cells-in-vitro-by-targeting-mitochondria May 9 2018TRAIL, a member of the TNF family of ligands, causes caspase-dependent apoptosis through activation of its receptors, death receptor 4 and DR5.ONC201 was originally identified as a small molecule that inhibits both Akt and ERK, resulting in dephosphorylation of Foxo3a and thereby induces TRAIL transcription.Recently, two independent groups, Wafik El Deiry at Fox Chase and Michael Andreeff at MD Anderson,reported that ONC201 induces cell death via cell stress mechanisms, independent of TRAIL transcription. Gene expression profiling analysis revealed that ONC201 induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress or integrated stress response -related genes, such as Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF4) and C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP).Related StoriesTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerEmbrace your natural skin tone to prevent skin cancer, say expertsCancer killing capability of lesser-known immune cells identifiedThe researchers in Dr. Lipkowitz’s group at the Center for Cancer Research in the National Cancer Institute observed that ONC201 kills breast cancer cells via a TRAIL-independent mechanism. Time-lapse live cell imaging revealed that ONC201 induces cell membrane ballooning followed by rupture, distinct from the morphology of cells undergoing apoptosis. They found that ONC201 inhibits mitochondrial respiration and induces mitochondrial structural damage. Moreover, they found ONC201 reduces mitochondrial DNA copy number. Importantly, cells dependent on glycolysis, such as fumarate hydratase deficient cancer cells and multiple cancer cell lines with reduced amounts of mitochondrial DNA were resistant to ONC201. ONC201 induced ATF4 and CHOP in breast cancer cells, and the stress response it was partially dependent on the mitochondrial effects of ONC201.”Our work identifies a novel mechanism of ONC201 cytotoxicity that is based on the disruption of mitochondrial function, leading to ATP depletion and cell death in cancer cells that are dependent on mitochondrial respiration. Our study also suggests that cancer cells that are dependent on glycolysis will be resistant to ONC201″ Dr. Stanley Lipkowitz, Chief, Women’s Malignancies Branch, NCI.last_img read more

first_imgMay 15 2018The seemingly unrelated conditions of hypertension, epilepsy and overactive bladder may be linked by electrical activity in a protein long studied by a biomedical engineer at Washington University in St. Louis.After new technology recently revealed the structure of the protein, the lab of Jianmin Cui, professor of biomedical engineering in the School of Engineering & Applied Science, will collaborate with two others to take an unprecedented look into its molecular mechanisms potentially leading to the development of new drugs for these and other conditions.Cui has received a four-year, $2.9 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study the BK (big potassium) channel proteins in collaboration with labs from the University of Missouri-Columbia and the University of Massachusetts. The labs will each play a role in identifying new compounds that could go into the drug development pipeline.Cells have ion channels across the cell membrane, which are pathways that conduct electrical currents into or out of the cell and open in response to physical signals, such as voltage, or chemical signals, such as calcium ions. But these channels typically allow only one type of ion to pass through, for example, the BK channel only allows potassium to pass through.Recently, another lab used a new, Nobel-Prize-winning method called cryo-electron microscopy that allowed them to see the structure of the BK channel, which has given Cui’s lab a fresh look at the channel’s mechanisms. While researchers already knew the channel has three different domains -; the voltage-sensing domain, the cytosolic domain and the pore domain-; they do not know how sensors in other domains open the gate in the pore domain. Cui’s lab seeks to find that pathway.”In BK channel, the question is how would calcium binding in the cytosolic domain open the pore in the transmembrane pore domain,” Cui said. “We have the structural information, but the structure itself cannot answer the question of how the two domains will interact to propagate and transfer the movements in calcium binding that causes the cytosolic domain to open.”Related StoriesMother calls for protein shake regulation after daughter diesQuorn protein stimulates muscle building to a greater extent than milk proteinScientists discover hundreds of protein-pairs through coevolution studyTo answer the question, a lab at the University of Missouri-Columbia will identify chemical compounds that would bind and modify the channel protein to probe the parts of the channel protein that move upon calcium binding. They will pick out those compounds from a library of about a quarter of a million chemicals with known structures stored in computers. They will compare the structures of these chemicals one by one to potential sites in the channel protein using computers in an operation called docking, which may identify a handful of chemical compounds that might bind to the channel protein. Then they will apply the real compound of these hits from the in silico (in computer) screening to treat BK channels in cells and test if they modify channel function.At the University of Massachusetts, a team will simulate the motion of part of the protein to see if those motions are important in propagating the calcium-binding-induced movements to the pore.Finally, Cui’s lab will study the function of the channels by recording ionic currents flowing through these channels. These recordings, in combination with mutating the channel protein and some molecular modeling, will allow the lab to determine if the changes they see in the experiments and in simulation are factors for propagation.”We want to know where the structure changes, how does it change and what makes it change,” Cui said. “These understandings, along with the identification of compounds and their binding sites, could lead to the development of drugs for treating BK channel-related diseases.” Source:https://source.wustl.edu/2018/05/an-unprecedented-look-into-the-protein-behind-hypertension-epilepsy-and-other-conditions/last_img read more

first_img Source:https://www.pennmedicine.org/news/news-releases/2018/may/future-doctors-take-to-the-streets-to-address-real-life-problems-at-the-root-of-poor-health May 23 2018New Penn Medicine medical school program apprentices students to community health workers in inner-city PhiladelphiaMedical students seldom learn much about the real-life problems (hunger, joblessness, addiction) their patients face outside the clinic walls. Yet, these problems are at the root of poor health in many low-income communities. A new article published today in the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved describes a new approach to educating medical students about the real world.The course, developed by the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, apprentices medical students to community health workers (CHWs) in inner city Philadelphia. CHWs are trusted laypeople who come from the local community, hired and trained by healthcare organizations to support high-risk patients.By pairing up with community health workers, students had the opportunity to understand life from a different perspective. Most students had not experienced poverty or trauma in their own lives. The course also helped students to overcome implicit bias and discrimination, which often permeates healthcare experiences.”Thirty-year-old, uninsured, and taking street Xanax. You automatically think . . . difficult patient,” explained one student. “She had little dreads and they were dyed red. And the community health worker loved it. She was like ‘oh my god, your hair is so cute!’ Then the patient got this big smile on her face and was so willing to talk to us. My whole impression of her changed from this really difficult patient to just a sweetheart.”The Institute of Medicine and the Association of American Medical Colleges recently recommended medical schools should train students in skills related to community engagement, including the “cultural humility” needed to deal non-judgmentally with patients from very different walks of life. So far, relatively few med school programs aim to provide that training. When they do, it is often through lectures and reading assignments more than hands-on experience.Related StoriesHome-based support network helps stroke patients adjust after hospital dischargeSleep disorders in patients with low back pain linked to increased healthcare visits, costsAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyPenn’s early experience with this teaching experiment has been so promising that the course is now a permanent part of the curriculum, and is being expanded for nursing and social work students. The Penn Center for Community Health Workers is building on this course to develop online cultural competency training for students and even practicing clinicians.”In medical school, you learn about antibiotics and MRIs. There is a lot more to health than that,” said lead author Shreya Kangovi, MD, MS, director of the Penn Center for Community Health Workers. “Unless we train our future healthcare professionals to understand what life and health are like for real people, we’ll be failing them.”The article reports that in interviews, participating students indicated that the rotation generally met its goal of imparting community engagement skills. Students showed a better understanding of the life circumstances – from homelessness to the difficulty of getting a taxi in inner-city neighborhoods – that affected patients’ health care experiences. They also seemed to develop more confidence and competence at overcoming those challenges, as well as a greater appreciation for what community health workers do. To date, 60 students have participated in the rotation.Kangovi and colleagues hope that the new rotation will serve as a model for other teaching hospitals that want to prepare students to care for low-income patient populations.​last_img read more

first_imgAgency officials apparently took those comments to heart. Regarding question 12, the bureau said today that “[g]iven the importance of this small population group to the economy, the federal statistical system and the nation, bolstered by the new knowledge of historical precedent brought to light by commenters to the Federal Register notice, the Census Bureau therefore plans to retain this question on the 2016 ACS.”Similarly, it backed away from dropping the marriage questions, writing that “in deference to the very large number of comments received on the Census Bureau proposal to eliminate those questions, the Census Bureau plans to retain those questions on the 2016 ACS.”The ACS has long been a target for political conservatives, who say its questions are intrusive. Several federal legislators also think that private companies could do the survey for much less money. In 2012, the Census Bureau agreed to review the ACS with the goal of “provid[ing] the most useful information with the least amount of burden” without lowering the quality of the survey.Some observers predicted that the agency would ultimately recommend retaining the targeted questions but that it needed to show Congress that it had exercised due diligence. Today’s notice is actually its intent to act, subject to the approval of the White House Office of Management and Budget. The U.S. Census Bureau has decided not to drop questions from its annual American Community Survey (ACS) about marital history and what people studied in college after researchers complained about the pending loss of important data.Last fall, the agency had proposed removing the questions in a bid to streamline the 72-question survey, begun in 2005 as a replacement for the so-called long form of the decennial census. The questions had scored low in a review that evaluated whether they were mandated by Congress, their cost, the burden to respondents, and their overall utility.In a Federal Register notice posted today, the Census Bureau says it received 1361 comments urging it to retain three questions (#21, #22, and #23) relating to marital history and status and 625 comments asking it to preserve the question (#12) about a resident’s undergraduate college major. Demographers and social scientists say states already do a poor job of providing marriage data and that federal registries are “a disgrace.” The National Science Foundation had spent years lobbying for the Census Bureau to include the college-major question, arguing that it is essential for monitoring trends in the scientific workforce. 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first_imgWith that in mind, the government should use this month’s midyear budget statement to raise spending on R&D to 3% of gross domestic product, up from its current 1.7%. “If we want to make the most of the economic opportunities that Brexit could bring, we must increase our science funding in line with key competitors like Germany and the U.S.,” Metcalfe said. A parliamentary committee has warned the U.K. government that its general reassurances to U.K. researchers and European scientists working in the country are not enough and that the needs of research should be at the center of exit negotiations with the European Union. To ensure that, the new Department for Exiting the European Union, should appoint a chief scientific adviser, says the House of Commons Science and Technology Committee in a report on Brexit released today.People and groups who provided evidence for the report voiced concerns about funding, workforce, collaboration, regulation, and facilities. A particular worry was over the status of EU researchers working in the United Kingdom and what their status would be after Brexit. “Telling EU scientists and researchers already working in the U.K. that they are allowed to stay is one way the government could reduce that uncertainty right away,” committee chair Stephen Metcalfe said in a statement. Regardless of the United Kingdom’s future policy on immigration, the report says, “researcher mobility is a crucial component of the UK’s successful research and science sector.” The government needs to go beyond its simple assertions that the United Kingdom will be “open for business,” the committee says, and “articulate an ambitious vision for science.”last_img read more

first_img Doctors have lots of tools for predicting a patient’s health. But—as even they will tell you—they’re no match for the complexity of the human body. Heart attacks in particular are hard to anticipate. Now, scientists have shown that computers capable of teaching themselves can perform even better than standard medical guidelines, significantly increasing prediction rates. If implemented, the new method could save thousands or even millions of lives a year. “I can’t stress enough how important it is,” says Elsie Ross, a vascular surgeon at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, who was not involved with the work, “and how much I really hope that doctors start to embrace the use of artificial intelligence to assist us in care of patients.”Each year, nearly 20 million people die from the effects of cardiovascular disease, including heart attacks, strokes, blocked arteries, and other circulatory system malfunctions. In an effort to predict these cases, many doctors use guidelines similar to those of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA). Those are based on eight risk factors—including age, cholesterol level, and blood pressure—that physicians effectively add up. But that’s too simplistic to account for the many medications a patient might be on, or other disease and lifestyle factors. “There’s a lot of interaction in biological systems,” says Stephen Weng, an epidemiologist at the University of Nottingham in the United Kingdom. Some of those interactions are counterintuitive: A lot of body fat can actually protect against heart disease in some cases. “That’s the reality of the human body,” Weng says. “What computer science allows us to do is to explore those associations.”In the new study, Weng and his colleagues compared use of the ACC/AHA guidelines with four machine-learning algorithms: random forest, logistic regression, gradient boosting, and neural networks. All four techniques analyze lots of data in order to come up with predictive tools without any human instruction. In this case, the data came from the electronic medical records of 378,256 patients in the United Kingdom. The goal was to find patterns in the records that were associated with cardiovascular events.First, the artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms had to train themselves. They used about 78% of the data—some 295,267 records—to search for patterns and build their own internal “guidelines.” They then tested themselves on the remaining records. Using record data available in 2005, they predicted which patients would have their first cardiovascular event over the next 10 years, and checked the guesses against the 2015 records. Unlike the ACC/AHA guidelines, the machine-learning methods were allowed to take into account 22 more data points, including ethnicity, arthritis, and kidney disease.All four AI methods performed significantly better than the ACC/AHA guidelines. Using a statistic called AUC (in which a score of 1.0 signifies 100% accuracy), the ACC/AHA guidelines hit 0.728. The four new methods ranged from 0.745 to 0.764, Weng’s team reports this month in PLOS ONE. The best one—neural networks—correctly predicted 7.6% more events than the ACC/AHA method, and it raised 1.6% fewer false alarms. In the test sample of about 83,000 records, that amounts to 355 additional patients whose lives could have been saved. That’s because prediction often leads to prevention, Weng says, through cholesterol-lowering medication or changes in diet.“This is high-quality work,” says Evangelos Kontopantelis, a data scientist at the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom who works with primary care databases. He says that dedicating more computational power or more training data to the problem “could have led to even bigger gains.”Several of the risk factors that the machine-learning algorithms identified as the strongest predictors are not included in the ACC/AHA guidelines, such as severe mental illness and taking oral corticosteroids. Meanwhile, none of the algorithms considered diabetes, which is on the ACC/AHA list, to be among the top 10 predictors. Going forward, Weng hopes to include other lifestyle and genetic factors in computer algorithms to further improve their accuracy.Kontopantelis notes one limitation to the work: Machine-learning algorithms are like black boxes, in that you can see the data that go in and the decision that comes out, but you can’t grasp what happens in between. That makes it difficult for humans to tweak the algorithm, and it thwarts predictions of what it will do in a new scenario.Will physicians soon adopt similar machine-learning methods in their practices? Doctors really pride themselves on their expertise, Ross says. “But I, being part of a newer generation, see that we can be assisted by the computer.” Self-taught artificial intelligence beats doctors at predicting heart attacks Email Artificial intelligence may help prevent heart failure. By Matthew HutsonApr. 14, 2017 , 3:30 PMcenter_img Devrimb/iStockphoto Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. 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first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Drop in ‘forbidden’ words Usage of specific terms in Centers for Disease Control and Prevention budget requests. Protesters from several health advocacy groups gathered this morning in front of the Washington, D.C., offices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Science tallied the usage of these words in CDC’s budget requests to Congress—formally known as Justification of Estimates for Appropriation Committees—for the past 4 years, including the last three submitted by Obama. The phrase “evidence-based” was the most common by far, appearing 125 times in the fiscal year 2017 request. In contrast, Trump’s 2018 budget request for CDC used it only 38 times, although the document was half the length of the last one Obama wrote. Diversity took a dive in 2018, to two mentions, compared with 10 in Obama’s last budget; the only remaining references were to CDC’s Office of Women’s Health and the Diversity Management Program and geographic diversity. “Vulnerable” was invoked nine times by Trump compared with 24 times by Obama.In contrast, the words “fetus” (in reference to Zika virus and microcephaly) and “entitlement” (“fighting waste, fraud, and abuse in Federal entitlement programs”) each appeared once in Trump’s 2018 budget. None of Obama’s three most recent budget requests mentions either word. Presidential budget requests are political documents, and the wrong word can send a confusing message—and trigger controversy. President Donald Trump’s administration appears to have kicked up its own tumult by instructing the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to avoid certain words in its 2019 budget request.On Friday, The Washington Post reported that CDC officials last week flagged seven words and phrases—diversity, entitlement, evidence-based, fetus, science-based, transgender, and vulnerable—that should not be used in connection with the budget document, due out in early February 2018. An analysis by ScienceInsider of the past four CDC budget requests finds that such a policy may have already gone into effect: Those words, in toto, appeared two-thirds less frequently in Trump’s 2018 budget request to Congress than in former President Barack Obama’s final budget submission for 2017.Critics slammed the purported ban. “Here’s a word that’s still allowed: ridiculous,” Rush Holt, CEO of AAAS (Science’s publisher), told the Post. Other science advocates decried the alleged dictate as “an Orwellian attack on scientific integrity,” “absurd,” “irrational,” and “censorship.” This morning, representatives from several science and justice advocacy groups held a small protest in front of CDC’s Washington, D.C., office. Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) CDC word ban? The fight over seven health-related words in the president’s next budgetcenter_img Alex Morash/The National LGBTQ Task Force Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By Jon CohenDec. 18, 2017 , 2:40 PM *Note: “strain” and “genetic” diversity not counted. Credits: (Graphic) J. Cohen/Science; (Data) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention As the Post noted, CDC’s parent agency, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), issued a statement that strongly challenged the media reports. “The assertion that HHS has ‘banned words’ is a complete mischaracterization of discussions regarding the budget formulation process,” the statement said. “HHS will continue to use the best scientific evidence available to improve the health of all Americans. HHS also strongly encourages the use of outcome and evidence data in program evaluations and budget decisions.”CDC Director Brenda Fitzgerald addressed the controversy on Twitter. “I want to assure you there are no banned words at CDC,” Fitzgerald tweeted yesterday.The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), another HHS branch, stated that there were no word bans there. “We haven’t received, nor implemented, any directives with respect to the language used at FDA to describe our policy or budget issues,” said a spokesperson. The media office for the director at the National Institutes of Health, another HHS unit, told Science that “we are deferring requests to HHS.”last_img read more

first_img Many of the roads are more than twice as wide as modern two-lane thoroughfares, even though Ancient Puebloans had no wheeled transportation or beasts of burden. Some roads lead to Chaco Canyon, the epicenter of Ancient Puebloan society and now the heart of the national park. Others seem to lead nowhere. When Sofaer and colleagues explored one newly identified road from the ground, they found a mix of sherds from different pots strewn along the roadbed, lending credence to the theory that this road, at least, was for ceremonial use.Few roads outside the park are protected. “Historically what was protected was the large building sites and the boundary around them” in the national park, Sofaer explains. “The question is how we protect the areas between the sites.”Although companies have pumped oil and gas from the basin for a century, development only recently spread into the Chaco area, after advances in directional drilling and hydraulic fracturing allowed companies to coax oil and gas from the previously impenetrable Mancos shale formation underneath the region. In March, BLM planned to offer 26 parcels for lease to oil and gas companies. One grazes the periphery of a 16-kilometer-wide temporary buffer that former President Barack Obama’s administration imposed around the park; another parcel lies near a site along the Great North Road, a 9-meter-wide thoroughfare that leads 50 kilometers straight north from Chaco Canyon. After a Navajo group and environmental groups protested the leases, Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke suspended the sale.On 23 April, however, Judge James Browning of the U.S. District Court for the District of New Mexico issued a ruling that may have implications for those shelved parcels. In 2015, environmental groups had sued BLM, arguing that it failed to protect cultural sites when approving drilling permits in the Chaco area. In the new ruling, Browning disagreed. He wrote that BLM only needed to survey the immediate area where the well would be drilled and that it had demonstrated that “Chaco Park and its satellites are outside of the wells’ APEs [areas of potential effect].”That decision could bring the 26 suspended parcels back into play, says Kyle Tisdel, an attorney with the Taos, New Mexico, office of the Western Environmental Law Center, which brought the suit on behalf of the groups. “I can imagine the judge’s ruling emboldening the [BLM] field office to further prioritize oil and gas,” he says. Meanwhile, New Mexico senators and indigenous groups are pressing BLM to place a moratorium on energy development in the area until the agency updates its 2003 resource management plan, which was crafted before heightened industry interest in the Mancos shale.Zach Stone, a spokesperson for BLM’s Farmington field office, says energy development has actually contributed to the archaeological record. He notes that BLM must conduct cultural surveys before drilling on a leased parcel can begin. “A lot of these sites would never have been found without oil and gas development, because we have to go out and look for them” before drilling starts, he said. BLM recently commissioned lidar surveys for the area around the park but has analyzed little of the data so far, and it’s unclear whether the data will inform the new management plan.Friedman says BLM’s ground surveys may miss the subtle signs of ancient roads. Sofaer estimates that as many as 80% of roads are still undocumented, and she fears that without costly lidar analysis, they never will be. Her team’s $600,000 project to conduct a lidar survey of Chacoan lands in southeastern Utah failed to find funding. In March, BLM leased several parcels there, at least one of which abuts a Chacoan great house and, perhaps, roads that have yet to be found. “This [development] is happening just as we’re discovering the larger landscape,” she says.Friedman is taking matters into his own hands: He recently acquired BLM’s full lidar data set and will begin combing it for more roads in the area around the park. “That’s in my spare time,” he says. Drilling boom threatens web of ancient roads in Southwest Filling in a road map Aerial and historic photos have revealed some ancient roads in the Chacoan region, especially near the national park (mapped below), but lidar analysis uncovered at least 5 kilometers of previously unknown thoroughfares, implying a far more extensive network. CREDITS: (MAP) A. CUADRA/SCIENCE; (DATA) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT About 1000 years ago, indigenous people built an elaborate network of great houses, kivas, and grand roads centered on Chaco Canyon, in the middle of the San Juan Basin of present-day New Mexico. Today, the region is one of the nation’s most productive oil and gas basins. It is also the setting of a collision between burgeoning energy development and archaeology, as new discoveries reveal the importance of the larger landscape in understanding Chacoan society.Taking advantage of advances in drilling technology, more than 4000 new wells will be developed in the area in the coming years, predicts the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), which manages development of federal mineral resources. Late last month, a federal judge issued a decision that may encourage the sale of oil and gas leases and eventual drilling near the Chaco Culture National Historical Park and known ancient roads. As a coalition of environmental and tribal groups mulls an appeal, they also await a new management plan from BLM, due as early as next month. With President Donald Trump’s administration pushing for more oil and gas development on public lands, they worry the new plan may favor development at the expense of cultural and environmental protection.Meanwhile, advances in remote sensing are revealing hundreds of previously unknown roads between Puebloan sites. As companies scrape well pads and access roads from the high desert scrub, archaeologists fear they will erase ancient roads before they have been fully studied—or even detected. “This real intense development that they’re talking about essentially transforms the landscape into an industrial park,” said John Roney, an independent cultural consultant based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, who formerly worked for BLM and conducted the first aerial survey of Chaco roads. An aerial photo shows ancient linear roads that led to Pueblo Alto in Chaco Culture National Historical Park. By April ReeseMay. 16, 2018 , 12:50 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) ADRIEL HEISEY Although the park encompasses the largest pueblo, hundreds of smaller sites dot a 100,000-square-kilometer area surrounding the point where Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah meet. Old aerial photos had traced roads extending from some sites. But a 2017 paper in Advances in Archaeological Practice revealed previously unknown roads.For this project, Anna Sofaer, an archaeo-astronomer who heads the nonprofit Solstice Project in Santa Fe, collaborated with Richard Friedman and Robert Weiner, who specialize in lidar, a technology that uses laser pulses from an airplane to reveal fine features on the landscape. Their analysis of three small areas near the park detected previously undocumented road segments and suggested that hundreds, perhaps thousands, of ancient roadways traverse the San Juan Basin. The pilot study “told us what the potential would be for the whole Chaco region,” Sofaer says. “Now we know that each of these great houses has spokes of roads [around it].”The lidar work also “helps us understand just how much effort went into creating what we think of as this greater Chacoan world,” adds Friedman, a Chaco expert and geographic information systems instructor at San Juan College in Farmington, New Mexico. “A 30-foot [9-meter] road … took a lot of labor just to create.” Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwelast_img read more

first_imgSteelhead trout have proved quite capable of abandoning the sea for a life in fresh water. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Although we tend to think of evolution as happening over thousands, if not millions, of years, critical changes can take little more than a century. That’s what happened with a group of steelhead trout transplanted from the salty seas of California to the fresh waters of Lake Michigan for game fishermen in the 1890s. A new study shows that the fish, which typically live part of their lives in the ocean like salmon, developed key genetic differences that allowed it to live wholly in freshwater—in little more than 100 years.The discovery shows how quickly organisms can adapt to a new lifestyle—if they have some of the right genes to start with, says Michael Blouin, a geneticist at Oregon State University in Corvallis. “The work is a nice example” of how evolution can happen “over very short time periods.”Steelhead already had a taste for freshwater. They hatch in rivers hundreds of kilometers from the Pacific, spend long periods as adults in the ocean, then return to their home rivers to spawn. And they even have a form—the popular rainbow trout—that lives out its whole life in freshwater streams. But that saltwater steelhead so readily made Lake Michigan their full-time home was surprising. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe This saltwater trout evolved to live in freshwater—in just 100 years Mint Images/Aurora Photos center_img By Elizabeth PennisiJun. 1, 2018 , 4:00 PM Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) To find the genetic basis of this quick adaptation, a team led by evolutionary biologist Mark Christie from Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana, and his postdoc Janna Willoughby sequenced the genomes of 264 steelhead. Some came from the source waters in California that supplied the first Lake Michigan fish, while others were collected from the lake’s watershed in 1983 and 1998. By comparing those genomes, they reconstructed the steelhead’s struggles to adapt.The first batch of transplants had a hard time, likely dying off by the hundreds. But the few that survived thrived, and between 1983 and 1998, their population started to rebound and even diversify, most likely because of interbreeding with newly introduced hatchery fish, Willoughby and Christie report this week in Molecular Ecology.Three regions of DNA were quite different between the modern lake and saltwater steelhead. Two of those contain genes critical for maintaining the fish’s internal salt balance: Freshwater fish must take in extra salts, whereas saltwater fish must get rid of them. Moving salt in opposite directions requires different versions of the relevant genes. Another DNA region seems to affect wound healing. This may help the lake steelheads recover from parasitic lampreys, which are widespread in that freshwater.So how did the genes change so quickly from one version to another? Intriguingly, there was no sign that steelhead had interbred with rainbow trout to get the genes they needed to thrive. They also didn’t have to mutate, Christie explains. Instead, there were likely a few steelhead among the first batch of transplants that already had the right versions of these genes—they simply survived and reproduced much more successfully than their peers. Eventually, the less well-adapted steelhead disappeared.More work needs to be done to prove that the genetic changes are due to freshwater living and not chance, says Felicity Jones, an evolutionary biologist at the Friedrich Miescher Laboratory of the Max Planck Society in Tübingen, Germany. She and her colleagues have found that the small minnowlike fish called sticklebacks have also made the transition from saltwater to freshwater, and have undergone similar same genetic shifts. “The transition … is a major change,” Blouin explains. “It would not be surprising to see the same adaptation in multiple species.”last_img read more

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) There’s an arms race going on in this bird nest. Scientists are uncovering how each side fights back Cowbirds are the quintessential deadbeat parents. They, and about 90 other bird species, abandon their eggs in other birds’ nests, leaving the burden of chick care to others. An arms race is the result: Cuckolded foster parents keep evolving ways to fight back, and deadbeats evolve countermeasures. Now, researchers have discovered how spots on an egg play a crucial role in a parent’s decision to keep an egg—or boot it from the nest.One of the shiny cowbird’s (Molothrus bonariensis) most common victims is the chalk-browed mockingbird (Mimus saturninus). The mockingbird’s eggs are blue-green and spotted, whereas the cowbird’s eggs vary from pure white to brown and spotted. Researchers had assumed mockingbirds reject cowbird eggs that don’t look like their own, in pattern and color. But the new study finds it’s not that simple.To get a better sense of how mockingbirds decide which eggs to boot, evolutionary ecologist Daniel Hanley at Long Island University in Brookville, New York, and colleagues painted 70 3D-printed eggs a range of colors and put spots on half of them. They distributed these eggs among 85 mockingbird nests and checked several days later to see which eggs were still there. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Even though foreign blue and brownish speckled eggs don’t match the mockingbird’s own blue-green spotted egg, they still tended to be accepted by the parent bird. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Spots tended to make the mockingbirds hedge their bets and keep an egg, even if the color wasn’t “right,” Hanley and his colleagues report in the April issue of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B. For example, the mockingbirds removed unspotted brown eggs—a “wrong” color and pattern—90% of the time. But the birds were less sure when the egg had spots. They removed brown eggs with spots just 60% of the time, for example. In general, mockingbirds were more accepting of very blue eggs, even those that were much bluer than their own eggs. And when these blue eggs had spots, parents kept them more than 90% of the time.“Adding spots can make an egg more acceptable,” says Sheena Cotter, an evolutionary ecologist at the University of Lincoln in the United Kingdom who was not involved with the work. So spots are an easy way for parasitic cowbirds to ensure their eggs are safe, even if they aren’t a perfect match.But sometimes, the scofflaw bird has to do more than just make sure its eggs have spots. In Zambia, Mary Caswell Stoddard, an evolutionary biologist at Princeton University, and her colleagues recorded when 122 tawny-flanked prinias (Prinia subflava) rejected foreign eggs from their nests. The researchers noted the colors, sizes, and markings of each egg in each nest, and used a sophisticated pattern-recognition computer program to classify the shapes and orientations of the markings.When the eggs are very similar to their own, the prinias use the shapes and positioning of the splotches to make the right call and keep an egg, she and her colleagues report in the same issue of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B. “The exact placement [of a spot] is very hard to mimic,” Cotter points out, making it possible for prinias to use that information when they are not sure whether an egg is theirs.The two papers address the long-standing question of how parasitized birds recognize the difference between their own and imposter eggs, says Rose Thorogood, an evolutionary ecologist at the University of Helsinki who was not involved with the work.These new studies show that sometimes the foster parents have become very smart—and persnickety—about what eggs they keep, Stoddard adds. After parasites evolve spots as a consistent part of the egg’s disguise, the foster parent evolves to use more brain power so it can remember more details about the spotting and hence become more discriminating. “What’s going on in the brains of [birds] is even more complex and interesting than we imagined,” she says. Email By Elizabeth PennisiMar. 5, 2019 , 1:00 PM Analía V. López last_img read more

first_imgThree in four female physics undergrads report sexual harassment Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Meredith WadmanApr. 23, 2019 , 1:45 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img The study found that experiencing harassment significantly predicted feelings of not belonging and of being an imposter, both of which are linked to students leaving scientific disciplines. Indeed, the harassment may help explain why only 18% of undergraduate U.S. physics majors are women. “Thirty years of literature [demonstrate] that the more women are harassed in a field, the more they contemplate leaving and ultimately leave,” the authors write, citing a landmark 2018 report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.The first author on the new study is Lauren Aycock, a science and technology policy fellow with AAAS in Washington, D.C., which publishes Science. Email Fully three in four U.S. undergraduate women majoring in physics reported being sexually harassed over a 2-year period ending in 2017, according to a new paper in Physical Review Physics Education Research.That year, scholars surveyed more than 450 undergraduate women attending conferences sponsored by the American Physical Society. They represented a significant chunk of female physics undergraduates, considering that in 2015—the most recent year for which data are available—1349 women received bachelor’s degrees in physics.Questioned about specific forms of harassment, 68% reported experiencing sexist remarks such as “women aren’t as good at physics” or being treated differently, ignored, or put down because of their gender. Fifty-one percent said they endured sexual jokes; were the object of sexual remarks about their bodies, appearance, or clothing; or had their sexual activity discussed. And 24% reported receiving unwanted sexual attention.last_img read more

first_img 62 Black Men And Boys Killed By Police A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’ Black boys and men killed by police composite photo Agents recovered two semi-automatic rifles, a Glock handgun, which was reportedly stolen from Talladega, Alabama. In addition, over five kilograms of suspected methamphetamine with an estimated street value of around $250,000.00 and over 13 lbs. of marijuana valued at more than $60,000.00.He was charged with trafficking methamphetamine and marijuana and possession of a firearm by a convicted felon. Another person Tiffany Peterson, 33, was arrested and charged with trafficking methamphetamine, trafficking marijuana, and possession of a firearm during the commission of a felony. It’s not clear if Peterson and Dark are connected.According to K Digga’s bio, he “has been officially titled ‘Mr . Alabama’ because of his die hard hustle and relentless drive to win.” His albums include  “Gangster Party Chronicals, Vol. 18,” “4 Way – EP,” “Gangster Party Chronicals Vol. 19,” and “Zaytoven Presents Zaytiggy’s Gumbo.”He also says in his bio, “I guess it’s like I’m almost preaching and telling it, how it is? Instead of offering a bunch of punch-lines and cheap gimmicks to make folks laugh, I like to make them think. I talk about real life situations and how they affect me and my everyday life.” His bio claims to have worked with Gucci Mane, Rocko Tha Don and Yo Gotti.Check out his song “Street Nigga Sh*t” below: Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racist Drugs , Georgia , rapper center_img Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Family More By NewsOne Staff SEE ALSO:HBCU Puts Focus On Mental Health So Students Can Thrive AcademicallyChicago Paramedics Says It Was A ‘Tragic Error’ To Let A 17-Year-Old Gunshot Victim Die In The StreetThis Colin Kaepernick Retweet Says Everything You Need To Know About The NFL Players’ Anthem GrievanceMeet Jogger Joe, The Man Who Took Racist Cue From BBQ Becky In Tossing Homeless Man’s Clothes Sounds like a scene from “Hustle & Flow” has come to my life for a rapper named Mr. Alabama. He reportedly threw $300,000 in drugs off an apartment complex balcony and now he is behind bars.See Also: 5 Things We Want To See From Cory Booker In The First Democratic Presidential DebateThe Georgia Bureau of Investigation says drug and gang investigators arrested Kelvin James Dark, 37, who goes by the names “K Digga” and “Mr. Alabama.” A press release titled “It’s Raining Meth” says the drama went down July 10 at a Atlanta, Georgia apartment complex. During an execution of a warrant he supposedly “threw multiple kilograms of suspected methamphetamine from the balcony of an Atlanta high rise. Fortunately, APD officers were able to safely recover the discarded contraband from a nearby surface street without incident. Dark is charged with trafficking methamphetamine, trafficking marijuana, and possession of a firearm by convicted felon.last_img read more

first_img By Daniel CleryOct. 29, 2018 , 3:45 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Hubble’s Law, a cornerstone of cosmology that describes the expanding universe, should now be called the Hubble-Lemaître Law, following a vote by the members of the International Astronomical Union (IAU), the same organization that revoked Pluto’s status as a planet. The change is designed to redress the historical neglect of Georges Lemaître, a Belgian astronomer and priest who in 1927 discovered the expanding universe—which also suggests a big bang. Lemaître published his ideas 2 years before U.S. astronomer Edwin Hubble concluded that galaxies farther from the Milky Way recede faster.The final tally of the 4060 cast votes, announced today by IAU, was 78% in favor of the name change, 20% against, and 2% abstaining. But the vote was not without controversy, both in its execution and the historical facts it was based on. Helge Kragh, a historian of science at the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, calls the background notes presented to IAU members “bad history.” Others argue it is not IAU’s job to rename physical laws. “It’s bad practice to retroactively change history,” says Matthias Steinmetz of the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics in Potsdam, Germany. “It never works.”Piero Benvenuti of the University of Padua in Italy, who stepped down as IAU general secretary in August, proposed the change last year because, he says, “historically, it felt not right.” In 1927 Lemaître calculated a solution to Albert Einstein’s general relativity equations that indicated the universe could not be static but was instead expanding. He backed up that claim using previously published measurements to show a relationship between the distances of galaxies and their velocities, calculated from their Doppler shifts. However, he published his results in French, in an obscure Belgian journal, and so they went largely unnoticed. In 1929, Hubble used largely the same data to show a linear relationship between velocity and distance for receding galaxies and published a second paper in 1931 with more data. It became known as Hubble’s Law. “Hubble was clearly involved, but was not the first,” says astronomer Michael Merrifield of the University of Nottingham in the United Kingdom. “He was good at selling his story.”The text of the IAU resolution, circulated to members ahead of the vote, asserts that Hubble and Lemaître met in 1928, at an IAU general assembly in Leiden, the Netherlands—between the publication of their two papers—and “exchanged views” about the blockbuster theory. Kragh says that meeting “almost certainly didn’t take place” and that IAU’s statement “has no foundation in documented history.” Benvenuti counters that historians know from comments from Hubble’s assistant that he returned very excited from Leiden and began to gather more data. “Who else could have talked to Hubble about this problem but Lemaitre?” Benvenuti asks.The resolution has also come under fire for confusing two different issues: the expansion of the universe and the distance-velocity relation for galaxies, which is also known as the Hubble constant. Hubble never claimed to have discovered cosmic expansion, but did do much of observing work to nail down how fast the universe was expanding. “If the law is about the empirical relationship, it should be Hubble’s Law,” Kragh says. “If it is about cosmic expansion, it should be Lemaître’s Law.”Members have also criticized IAU over the way the vote was conducted. Traditionally, IAU resolutions are debated at general assemblies, once every 3 years, and decided by a show of hands of attending members. But such a straw poll led to the unpopular 2006 vote that reclassified Pluto as a dwarf planet. “The IAU got badly burned over the Pluto thing,” Merrifield says. As a result, IAU introduced the provision of having an online vote of the whole 11,000 membership.In the case of Hubble’s Law, attendees at the August general assembly in Vienna were frustrated by a very short debate, followed by a straw poll (74% in favor of the name change). The IAU executive committee invited others to submit questions electronically and launched the online vote at the beginning of October. Merrifield says there was not enough time and opportunity for debate. “The IAU presented the issue as neat and tidy, but it is a much more murky and messy tale,” he says. He says several other researchers could have a claim because they were also working on cosmic expansion and galaxy motion at the time.A final concern is whether IAU is within its rights to weigh in on historical affairs. “There is no mandate to name physical laws,” Steinmetz says. IAU has acknowledged this and is only recommending the use of the term Hubble-Lemaître Law. Will it catch on? “No, I don’t think so,” Kragh says. “Hubble Law is ingrained in the literature for most of a century.”In any event, says Merrifield, “It doesn’t matter all that much, really.”*Correction, 29 October, 5:17 p.m.: An earlier version of this story misstated the frequency of IAU general assemblies.*Clarification, 6 November, 12:15 p.m.: This story and caption have been changed to clarify Hubble’s 1929 work and its reliance on the same data used by Lemaître. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Move over, Hubble: Discovery of expanding cosmos assigned to little-known Belgian astronomer-priestcenter_img Bettmann/Getty Images Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Belgian astronomer Georges Lemaître proposed the idea of an expanding universe 2 years before Edwin Hubble’s work on receding galaxies.last_img read more

first_img 209 slots vacated by Jet Airways are lying unused at 31 airports: Govt Advertising NCLAT agrees to hear Dutch Court administrator in Jet Airways insolvency case Advertising Written by Pritam Pal Singh | New Delhi | Updated: July 6, 2019 8:49:04 am Invoking his “fundamental rights”, the plea contended that no ECIR/FIR has been registered by any authority against him alleging commission of any offences warranting issuance of the LOC.According to the MCA, the LOC was issued after an inspection by the ministry found large-scale irregularities at Jet Airways, which in April was forced to ground more than three quarters of its fleet due to acute cash crunch.Naresh and Anita Goyal had resigned from the board of Jet Airways in March following a debt restructuring plan. He had also resigned as the airline’s chairman.Jet Airways is undergoing insolvency proceedings, which is at the stage of calling for Resolution Plans by the Insolvency Resolution Professional. Meanwhile, the ministry has also ordered a probe by SFIO into the affairs of Jet Airways. Related News naresh goyal, jet airways, jet airways debt, jet airways case, delhi high court, jet airways debt restructuring plan, jet airways look out circular, india news, naresh goyal travel ban Naresh Goyal had resigned from the board of Jet Airways in March, following a debt restructuring plan. (File/REUTERS)A Delhi High Court judge Friday recused himself from hearing a plea of former Jet Airways chairman Naresh Goyal, challenging the travel ban imposed on him. Justice Vibhu Bakhru, however, did not assign any reasons for recusing himself from the matter. “This matter will have to go before another bench,” the judge said, listing Goyal’s plea for July 8, which also seeks quashing of the Look-Out-Circular (LOC), on basis of which he has been restrained from moving outside India. He has also challenged various memorandums issued to him by the Home Ministry since December 2017, which lay down guidelines for issuing the travel ban.Goyal in his plea has said that the LOC has been issued without any basis and that the office memorandums are “bad in law”. Senior advocate Vikas Pahwa, appearing for Goyal, further apprised the court that, after they have filed the petition, the Serious Fraud Investigation Office (SFIO) has sent them a summoning order through WhatsApp to appear on July 10.According to Goyal’s plea, the LOC was issued against him on the request of the SFIO which comes under the Ministry of Corporate Affairs (MCA). Goyal said he came to know of the LOC on May 25 when he and his wife, Anita, were offloaded from a flight to Dubai with an onward connection to London. Hardeep Singh PuriL ‘Air India is more attractive after Jet shutdown’ Post Comment(s)last_img read more

first_imgBy AP |Mexico | Updated: June 26, 2019 9:15:06 pm Taking stock of monsoon rain Top News The bodies of Salvadorian migrant Oscar Alberto Martinez Ramirez and his daughter Valeria are seen after they drowned in the Rio Bravo river while trying to reach the United States, in Matamoros, in Tamaulipas state, Mexico June 24, 2019. Picture taken June 24, 2019. REUTERS/StringerThe man and his 23-month-old daughter lay face down in shallow water along the bank of the Rio Grande, his black shirt hiked up to his chest with the girl tucked inside. Her arm was draped around his neck suggesting she clung to him in her final moments. After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Advertising Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield In recent weeks alone, two babies, a toddler and a woman were found dead in the sweltering heat. Three children and an adult from Honduras died in April after their raft capsized on the Rio Grande, and a 6-year-old from India was found dead earlier this month in Arizona, where temperatures routinely soar well above 100 degrees Fahrenheit.The search for Martinez and his daughter was suspended Sunday due to darkness, and their bodies were discovered the next morning near Matamoros, Mexico, across from Brownsville, Texas, several hundred yards (meters) from where they had tried to cross and just a half-mile (1 kilometer) from an international bridge. Mexican authorities stand along the Rio Grande bank where the bodies of Salvadoran migrant Oscar Alberto Martínez Ramírez and his nearly 2-year-old daughter Valeria were found, in Matamoros, Mexico, Monday, June 24, 2019. (AP Photo/Julia Le Duc)Tamaulipas immigration and civil defense officials have toured shelters beginning weeks ago to warn against attempting to cross the river, said to be swollen with water released from dams for irrigation. On the surface, the Rio Grande appears placid, but strong currents run beneath.Ramirez said her son and his family left El Salvador on April 3 and spent about two months at a shelter in Tapachula, near Mexico’s border with Guatemala. “I begged them not to go, but he wanted to scrape together money to build a home,” Ramirez said. “They hoped to be there a few years and save up for the house.”El Salvador’s foreign ministry said it was working to assist the family, including Avalos, who was at a border migrant shelter following the drownings. The bodies were expected to be flown to El Salvador on Thursday. Tania Vanessa Ávalos of El Salvador, center left, is assisted by Mexican authorities after her husband and nearly two-year-old daughter were swept away by the current while trying to cross the Rio Grande to Brownsville, Texas, in Matamoros, Mexico, Sunday, June 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Julia Le Duc)The photo recalls the 2015 image of a 3-year-old Syrian boy who drowned in the Mediterranean near Turkey, though it remains to be seen whether it may have the same impact in focusing international attention on migration to the U.S.“Very regrettable that this would happen,” Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador said Tuesday in response to a question about the photograph. “We have always denounced that as there is more rejection in the United States, there are people who lose their lives in the desert or crossing” the river.There was no immediate comment from the White House.U.S. “metering” policy has dramatically reduced the number of migrants who are allowed to request asylum, down from dozens per day previously to sometimes just a handful at some ports of entry. Authorities stand behind yellow warning tape along the Rio Grande bank where the bodies of Salvadoran migrant Oscar Alberto Martínez Ramírez and his nearly 2-year-old daughter Valeria were found, in Matamoros, Mexico, Monday, June 24, 2019. (AP Photo/Julia Le Duc)The Tamaulipas government official said the family arrived in Matamoros early Sunday and went to the U.S. Consulate to try to get a date to request asylum. The mother is 21 years old and the father was 25, he added.But waits are long there as elsewhere along the border. Last week, a shelter director said only about 40 to 45 asylum interviews were being conducted in Matamoros each week, while somewhere in the neighborhood of 800-1,700 names were on a waiting list.It’s not clear what happened to the family at the U.S. Consulate, but later in the day they made the decision to cross. The Tamaulipas official said the father and daughter set off from a small park that abuts the river. Civil defense officials arrived at the scene at 7 p.m. Sunday and later took the wife to the shelter.“I was drawn to the girl’s arm on her father,” Le Duc said as she described arriving at the scene. “It was something that moved me in the extreme because it reflects that until her last breath, she was joined to him not only by the shirt but also in that embrace in which they passed together into death.”“It’s a horrifying image,” Maureen Meyer, a specialist on immigration at the Washington Office on Latin America, which advocates for human rights in the region, said of the photograph. “And I think it speaks so clearly to the real risks of these U.S. programs that are either returning people back to Mexico seeking asylum or in this case limiting how many people can enter the U.S. every day.”The United States has also been expanding its program under which asylum seekers wait in Mexico while their claims are processed in U.S. courts, a wait that could last many months or even years.This week Nuevo Laredo in Tamaulipas, the same state where Matamoros is located, said it will become the latest city to receive returnees as soon as Friday.Many migrant shelters are overflowing on the Mexican side, and cartels hold sway over much of Tamaulipas and have been known to kidnap and kill migrants.Meanwhile, Mexico is stepping up its own crackdown on immigration in response to U.S. pressure, with much of the focus on slowing the flow in the country’s south. Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach The account was based on remarks by Avalos to police at the scene _ “amid tears” and “screams” _ Le Duc told The Associated Press.Details of the incident were confirmed Tuesday by a Tamaulipas state government official who was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity, and by Martinez’s mother back in El Salvador, Rosa Ramirez, who spoke with her daughter-in-law by phone afterward.“When the girl jumped in is when he tried to reach her, but when he tried to grab the girl, he went in further … and he couldn’t get out,” Ramirez told the AP. “He put her in his shirt, and I imagine he told himself, `I’ve come this far’ and decided to go with her.” In this Sunday, June 23, 2019 photo, Tania Vanessa Ávalos of El Salvador speaks with Mexican authorities after her husband and nearly two-year-old daughter were swept away by the current while trying to cross the Rio Grande to Brownsville, Texas, in Matamoros, Mexico. Their bodies, the toddler still tucked into her father’s shirt with her arm loosely draped around him, were discovered Monday morning several hundred yards (meters) from where they had tried to cross. (AP Photo/Julia Le Duc)From the scorching Sonoran Desert to the fast-moving Rio Grande, the 2,000-mile U.S.-Mexico border has long been an at times deadly crossing between ports of entry. A total of 283 migrant deaths were recorded last year; the toll so far this year has not been released. More Explained The searing photograph of the sad discovery of their bodies on Monday, captured by journalist Julia Le Duc and published by Mexican newspaper La Jornada, highlights the perils faced by mostly Central American migrants fleeing violence and poverty and hoping for asylum in the United States.According to Le Duc’s reporting for La Jornada, Oscar Alberto Martinez Ramirez, frustrated because the family from El Salvador was unable to present themselves to US authorities and request asylum, swam across the river on Sunday with his daughter, Valeria. A US Border Patrol boat navigates the Rio Grande near where the bodies of Salvadoran migrant Oscar Alberto Martínez Ramírez and his nearly 2-year-old daughter Valeria were found, in Matamoros, Mexico, Monday, June 24, 2019. (AP Photo/Julia Le Duc)He set her on the US bank of the river and started back for his wife, Tania Vanessa Avalos, but seeing him move away the girl threw herself into the waters. Martinez returned and was able to grab Valeria, but the current swept them both away. Post Comment(s) “With greater crackdowns and restrictions,” said Cris Ramon, senior immigration policy analyst at the Bipartisan Policy Center think tank in Washington, “we could see more desperate measures by people trying to enter Mexico or the U.S.” Advertising Best Of Express Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Advertising After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan last_img

first_img Those pale button mushrooms in your supermarket hardly do justice to the diversity of fungi. The world hosts an incredible array of these important organisms—and mycologists are discovering more than 2000 new species a year, including ones that live on driftwood, bat guano, and even an oil painting. That’s according to a new report, titled State of the World’s Fungi, from the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, a botanical research institution in Richmond, U.K. The lavishly illustrated overview covers the usefulness of fungi (think beer, bread, and penicillin, for starters) as well as the serious threats that some fungi pose to agriculture and human health.Science spoke to Tuula Niskanen, a mycologist at Kew, who helped write the chapter on new discoveries. This interview has been edited for clarity and length.Q: One of the new discoveries was a fungus that lives inside cockroaches. Tell me more. Email This new species of mushroomlike lichen, a fungus living with a green alga, lives on salt deposits in the Chilean Andes. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Fungi that live in cockroaches, oil paintings, and other bizarre places come to light in new report P. Sandoval-Leiva center_img By Erik StokstadSep. 11, 2018 , 7:01 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) A: It’s a single-celled fungus that lives within the Malpighian tubules, which are equivalent to kidneys, of a tropical cockroach. It lives within the cells and parasitizes them, breaking them up and feeding on them. The fungus doesn’t necessarily kill the host—that’s not a smart strategy for a parasite. It’s not the first such species—the genus was first described in 1937—but it’s the first species described in the Madeira cockroach.Q: The diversity of places where fungi live seems extraordinary.A: One species was discovered in Antarctica, not the first, but in a curious place. It was found in diesel-contaminated soil. How is that possible? Probably my favorite was the fungus that can grow in the salt crusts of the Chilean Andes. It lives with a green alga, as a lichen, in a place where neither could survive alone. They look like mushrooms and are bright orange. It’s like, wow!Q: Were any useful species discovered?A: It usually takes time to figure out the more specific functions of fungi. One that’s inspiring is Aspergillus tubingensis. It was discovered earlier, but last year some researchers found out it can break down a kind of plastic called polyester polyurethane [making it potentially useful in recycling]. And it turns out that another species can live in very acidic soil and tolerate high levels of radiation, so it might be useful for cleaning contaminated soil.Q: Only 7% of fungus species have ever been described. How do you know how many species haven’t been discovered?A: Researchers look at the ratio of known plant and fungal species in places where we know this well, and also DNA studies of environmental samples. The estimates for total fungal diversity are extrapolated from that information. There is a big range, somewhere between 2.2 and 3.8 million species of fungi. There is still a huge amount of species to be discovered. At the current rate, it would take us more than 1000 years to describe them all.last_img read more

first_img Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Top News Advertising More than 250 people were killed in eight coordinated suicide attacks carried out by local Jihadi group National Thowheed Jammath (NTJ) linked to the ISIS on April 21.Sirisena has slammed the parliamentary probe as one to pin blame on him and accused Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe of being the mover behind the panel.The opposition blames the government’s inability to prevent the suicide bombings due to the ongoing power struggle between Sirisena and Wickremesinghe. Cabinet asks finance panel to consider securing funds for defence Jayasundera and Fernando were suspended by President Maithripala Sirisena for their alleged inaction on the intelligence shared by India, which warned of an impending attack by Islamic militants, and thereby, failing to prevent the serial blasts on April 21.Police Spokesperson Ruwan Gunasekara said that both men were at different hospitals undergoing treatment when police arrested them.Jayasundara was arrested from the Police Hospital while Fernando was taken into custody at the Colombo National Hospital.The duo was scheduled to appear before the CID. Cabinet asks finance panel to consider securing funds for defence Best Of Express Jayasundara was arrested from the Police Hospital while Fernando was taken into custody at the Colombo National Hospital. (Representational Image)Sri Lanka’s ex-defence secretary Hemasiri Fernando and suspended police chief Pujith Jayasundera were arrested on Tuesday, a day after the Attorney General instructed the authorities to charge them for their failure to prevent the Easter terror attacks that claimed 258 lives.center_img In a letter to acting police chief Chandana Wickremaratne, Attorney General Dappula de Livera on Monday said the duo should be tried for “grave crimes against humanity” for their failure to prevent the Easter Sunday bombings.De Livera also slammed Wickremeratne for not taking any action against the two as directed earlier on June 27. Wickremaratne’s inaction was of a serious nature, he said.Sirisena had appointed a three-member panel to probe the negligence by the top officials despite the availability of intelligence inputs on the impending attacks.Both Jayasundera and Fernando have testified before an ongoing parliamentary probe panel on the attacks. Both of them claimed that there was discounting of the seriousness of the threat at the very highest level. Sirisena is the minister-in-charge of defence. After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan By PTI |Colombo, Sri Lanka | Published: July 2, 2019 10:36:29 pm Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Advertising After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Post Comment(s)last_img read more