Tag: 上海千花龙凤

first_img Apple Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it Microsoft is jumping on the digital health bandwagon. Gety Images For the past couple years, tech companies like Apple, Google and even Facebook have been doing something seemingly against their interests: Encouraging us to stop using them. On Monday, Microsoft joined those companies by encouraging business people to be more mindful of their time too. The new features, built into the company’s Office 365 business productivity service for Windows PCs, Macs and mobile devices, tracks how people use their computers and then displays that information on a dashboard.For example, Microsoft’s software will soon start showing people how often they focused on a task and for how long. And it will also cheer them on if they successfully disconnected after work. You can even set goals for how often you have quiet days, Microsoft said. Read on ZDNet: Microsoft Build 2019: Azure is the star, and Windows is a bit player The new features, announced at the company’s Build developer conference in Seattle, are the latest in a growing trend of tech companies aiming to make us feel better about using their devices and services. They’re doing this by encouraging us to be more mindful about how much of our lives get taken up by technology in the first place. At Apple, this comes as part of a feature called Screen Time, which shows you how often you use your phone and what types of apps you’re using most. You can also set limits on how long you can use specific apps, like Facebook. Google’s Android software for phones and tablets has a tool called Digital Wellbeing that offers similar features. Even Facebook and Instagram, which are often derided as places people zone out and lose hours tapping and scrolling, have a screen time feature. For Microsoft, these features are part of a broader refinement to Microsoft’s Office 365 business software. The suite, which includes access to the company’s popular Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote and Outlook apps, is used by 180 million people. Microsoft said the new features will be available “in the next few months.”  Aug 31 • iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Which iPhone should you buy? Share your voice reading • Microsoft, at its Build 2019 conference, says you need to put down that phone Aug 31 • Best places to sell your used electronics in 2019 • Post a comment 0 Aug 31 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors Microsoft Office Google Microsoft Apple See All Computers Software Tech Industry Tagslast_img read more

first_imgBloomberg founder Micheal BloombergReutersFormer New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg rejoined the Democratic Party on Wednesday, going back to his political roots weeks before the November 6 congressional elections and amid speculation that he might run for the White House in 2020.Bloomberg, the billionaire founder, and chief executive of global media company Bloomberg LP, said in a post on social media he was re-registering as a Democrat, citing a potential constitutional crisis under Republican President Donald Trump, a fellow New York businessman.”At key points in U.S. history, one of the two parties has served as a bulwark against those who threaten our Constitution. Two years ago at the Democratic Convention, I warned of those threats,” Bloomberg wrote in a post on Instagram.”Today, I have re-registered as a Democrat – I had been a member for most of my life – because we need Democrats to provide the checks and balance our nation so badly needs.”Bloomberg, 76, was a longtime Democrat who became a Republican before running for mayor of the largest U.S. city in 2001. He left the Republican Party to become an independent in 2007 and served three terms as New York’s mayor, stepping down in 2013.He has considered running for president in the past as an independent but never did. The Guardian newspaper reported in August that he was considering running in 2020 as a Democrat.Representatives for Bloomberg could not be immediately reached for comment on Wednesday.A frequent critic of Trump, Bloomberg has donated $80 million to help Democrats gain control of the House of Representatives and $20 million to help Democrats running for U.S. Senate, which Republicans now narrowly control 51 to 49.Democrats are aiming to pick up 23 seats in the House to win a majority in the lower chamber, something political analysts have said is more likely than gaining an edge in the Senate.Taking control of either chamber would give Democrats leverage to oversee Trump and his administration, including the ability to hold hearings and subpoena officials.Bloomberg has used his fortune, which Forbes magazine has pegged at $51.8 billion, to push a number of liberal causes including efforts to tackle global warming and gun deaths.last_img read more

Skulls in ancient cemetery on Vanuatu suggest Polynesians as first settlers

first_img More information: Frédérique Valentin et al. Early Lapita skeletons from Vanuatu show Polynesian craniofacial shape: Implications for Remote Oceanic settlement and Lapita origins, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2015). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1516186113AbstractWith a cultural and linguistic origin in Island Southeast Asia the Lapita expansion is thought to have led ultimately to the Polynesian settlement of the east Polynesian region after a time of mixing/integration in north Melanesia and a nearly 2,000-y pause in West Polynesia. One of the major achievements of recent Lapita research in Vanuatu has been the discovery of the oldest cemetery found so far in the Pacific at Teouma on the south coast of Efate Island, opening up new prospects for the biological definition of the early settlers of the archipelago and of Remote Oceania in general. Using craniometric evidence from the skeletons in conjunction with archaeological data, we discuss here four debated issues: the Lapita–Asian connection, the degree of admixture, the Lapita–Polynesian connection, and the question of secondary population movement into Remote Oceania. Citation: Skulls in ancient cemetery on Vanuatu suggest Polynesians as first settlers (2015, December 29) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-12-skulls-ancient-cemetery-vanuatu-polynesians.html Explore further The researchers focused on skulls dug from the bottom of a cemetery on Efate Island, which has been dated back to approximately 3,000 years ago, making it the oldest in the South Pacific. The skulls, the team reports, belong to a people known as the Lapita, who are believed to have been the earliest settlers of the islands. The team compared the skulls with those of people currently living on the island and also other parts of Polynesia and Melanesia and concluded that the ancient skulls were closest in structure to modern Asians and Polynesians. This news came as a bit of a surprise because the current natives most resemble Melanesians. The researchers believe that the evidence suggests that Melanesia people arrived sometime after the Lapita had already populated the islands in the area and interbred with the people already living there.The researchers note that other evidence of the ancient Lapita people still exists as well—those living on the island share many cultural and linguistic similarities with early Polynesians, for example. But, they also add, it still doesn’t adequately address the issue of how it was that people living 3,000 years ago managed to navigate and populate an island group so far from their home—a path that would have taken them from South-East Asia through Melanesia and then into Polynesia, while somehow not leaving any evidence that they had mixed with the Melanesians. Their findings do suggest though, that the islands of Vanuatu may have served as a springboard of sorts, offering the early settlers a place to jump to other parts of the vast Pacific Ocean. Teouma Lapita skulls. Credit: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2015). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1516186113 (Phys.org)—A small team of researchers from France and Australia has found evidence in a very old cemetery (first discovered back in 2004) on one of the islands of Vanuatu that suggests that early Asians and Polynesians were the first human settlers, not Melanesians as many have suggested. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes how the question of the origin of the people of the Pacific Islands has confounded visitors from the west since perhaps the 16th century and why they believe their study finally provides the answers.center_img Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. South Pacific Island’s earliest inhabitants relied primarily on foraging, not horticulture © 2015 Phys.orglast_img read more