Tag: 上海后花园千花网

first_imgJP: A genuine editorial justification is that I’m interested in exploring new and different ways to tell stories, and different and innovative ways to do design. We want to offer a more interactive user experience. It’s not just a corporate [mandate]. I’m absolutely sincere that the principle justification for digital-first for Technology Review is a thinking, a mode of being, that promotes innovation and excellence. This will allow us to write smarter and more link-y journalism; to design more beautiful and interactive experiences.Though it is certainly true that print is healthy and not going away, it is by no means a growing business. It is becoming more and more expensive to acquire print readers. At the same time that’s happening, print advertising has been in free fall for the last 15 years. When I was the editor of Red Herring, in the first six months of 2000, we had more than $100 million in print advertising. We did two editions a month with 400 to 500 pages, and 40 percent of these pages was advertising. It is a great month at Technology Review when we have 30 pages of print advertising. When print audiences are not growing and it is becoming increasingly expensive to acquire new readers; when there is declining and stagnant print advertising; we’ve seen our online audiences increase 75 percent year-over-year.For me as a businessman, as I’m the publisher as well as the editor-in-chief, I must follow where the audiences and advertisers are going, and for us, they’re going to electronic media. We feel that some of the unhappiness of traditional publishers is richly deserved. They haven’t provided good service to their marketing partners and their media partners’ ad agencies. FOLIO: How are you defining “good service?” JP: National Journal; Ars Technica has an interesting membership service for Ars Technica Prime; the membership model at GigaOm. We looked outside traditional media business to the new media properties like Amazon, Google and even Facebook to begin to explore what membership and community might look like. We were transparently sincere when we said, ‘we don’t know, tell us what you want.’ We’ll add up all the stuff and try to price it at the level the market can bear. We want to be less like a traditional media company as we think about the membership model, and more like a software or Web company, maybe even like Apple.FOLIO: Describe the models you’ve worked through before getting to this digital-first plan. JP: We have very deliberately worked through a series of experimental models. We tried having an ‘all or nothing’ paywall. As many people discovered, it was the least effective of all possible options. We experimented with a porous paywall, which didn’t work for us because we don’t publish as much as NYT, WSJ or FT. They work well when you’re publishing so much. You have enough readers who are reading this waterfall of editorial that you create sufficient friction. We don’t publish that much, only three to seven stories a day. It’s not enough to create that needed friction. Then we’ve experimented with what has become a default, a paid print magazine and an entirely free site. While it works best, we don’t think that’s the long-term home of Tech Review. We suspect it will be some combination of a free website; one that’s readable on tablets as well as desktop and laptop computers, a print magazine for both national and international for as long as people want it and a membership model that does some innovative things.FOLIO: What is your revenue model now?JP: We are a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit, fully owned corporation of MIT, which doesn’t mean we’re not in business. We are a commercial enterprise. MIT gives me zero venture capital. Everything I want to do has to be funded by cashflow. MIT provides some revenue for an alumni magazine, that is appreciated, but it by no means pays our bills. They also subsidize us in a variety of other ways—our research material is free, we have access to MIT libraries. We receive about a third of our revenue from subscribers/consumers, which includes the newsstand. We receive a third from advertising—two-thirds of that is digital. Within that final third is a mixture of the MIT contribution and what is now our largest and fastest growing line of business, which is a foreign licensing line of business; and things like list rental. JP: You know that old joke which publishers like to chortle about, when marketers say, “I know I’m wasting half my ad dollars, I just don’t know which half?” That must be really infuriating if you’re in the advertising business. Online, we know exactly which advertising dollars are effective, and a strong impulse for going digital first is to provide more unique and more interactive opportunities for our strongest advertising partners and their agencies. There are some intriguing opportunities to which we don’t have all the answers for yet, about constructing a truly digital homologue to the old subscription business around membership and community. FOLIO: What models out there are appealing to you? Technology Review editor-in-chief Jason Pontin recently provided a one-two punch of blog posts detailing a pair of significant digital pivots for the brand. Both have caused a stir among the media crowd for their frank assessment of TR‘s progress in the digital space. The first announced the brand’s plan to ditch the app model after being “deluded” by its initial appeal. The second laid the groundwork for an exploration of a membership model after a series of paid and hybrid digital strategies failed to pan out. Here, Pontin explains what he and the team behind Technology Review have planned next.FOLIO: It’s obvious that the print isn’t going away for Technology Review. You’ve made it clear that it remains important to you.Jason Pontin [JP]: I love print, and we have a very robust international publishing business where print is by and large healthier than in the United States. We have editions in Germany, in China, in India, in Italy—we hope to expand soon to the Middle East, perhaps Russia. To serve our domestic audience and to surprise and delight our international readers, print will always be part of what we do, so long as I’m editor-in-chief and publisher.FOLIO: So then what is driving the digital-first decision? FOLIO: How do you see these portions shifting as you go digital-first?JP: I suspect we’ll remain a three-legged stool, though I’d like to see the width of the legs increase. I’d like to do more foreign publisher business. As our audiences grow, particularly online, I think we’ll see digital advertising swell. I don’t anticipate we’ll significantly increase print circulation, the membership model in some form will swell our consumer revenue.last_img read more

POLICE LOG for June 25 Road Rage On Butters Row Bridge Turtle

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Here are highlights of the Wilmington Police Log for Tuesday, June 25, 2019:Red light out was out at the entrance of the MBTA parking lot on Main Street. Mass Highway notified. (1:28am)A caller reported a large turtle in the Reed Street roadway. Turtle made it safely across. (7:16am)A caller reported there may be a man in a van living behind Ristuccia Arena. Man was advised he cannot stay on the property without permission. Party departed. (8:18am)A cat was struck by a car on Andover Street. Animal Control Officer brought cat to Mass Vet in Woburn. (8:28am)A caller reported an ex-girlfriend’s boyfriend keyed his vehicle on Salem Street. (12:56pm)Animal Control Officer removed a snapping turtle from a driveway on Vermont Road. (2:15pm)A caller reported a past road range incident on Butters Row Bridge. Male party in red pickup truck got out of vehicle and yelled at caller and another car to back up and give him the right of way. (4:18pm)A Church Street resident reported two vehicles, possibly Civics, drove past his home at high rate of speed estimated to be 90 MPH. Police unable to locate. (8:03pm)(DISCLAIMER: This information is public information.  An arrest does not constitute a conviction.  Any arrested person is innocent until proven guilty.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedPOLICE LOG for June 10: Driver Issued Summons; Bunny & Turtle Issues; Homeowner Gets Surprise After MidnightIn “Police Log”POLICE LOG for June 8: Wilmington Man Arrested For Assault & Battery With A Dangerous WeaponIn “Police Log”POLICE LOG for July 26: 2 Missing Teens; OUI Arrest; Main St. Shut Down Due To Crash; Road Rage IncidentIn “Police Log”last_img read more

Heres more evidence that Treatment as Prevention is a good way to

first_imgShare this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Researchers tracked the sexual behaviour of 343 couples in Australia, Brazil and Thailand over four years period. They specifically researched acts of condomless anal intercourse. They also tested the HIV-negative partner for HIV, and the HIV-positive partner’s viral load.12,000 acts of condomless sexResearchers tracked 12,000 acts of condomless anal intercourse where the HIV- negative partner was not taking PrEP and the HIV-positive partner was virally suppressed. They found there were no new HIV infections due to sex between Opposites Attract study partners.Since last year, the Opposites Attract data has added to a previously limited body of evidence in this area.Professor Andrew Grulich is the Kirby Institute’s HIV Epidemiology and Prevention Program head and the study’s chief investigator. He said the study results highlight some important findings.‘These results form a significant part of the evidence base for the international community-led Undetectable=Untransmissible, or U=U campaign,’ said Gurlich.‘(The campaign) highlights the fact that people living with HIV can now live long and healthy lives, with effectively zero chance of sexually transmitting the virus to others, provided their viral load is undetectable due to effective ART,’ Got a news tip? Want to share your story? Email us . eTN Chatroom for Readers (join us) The Opposites Attract survey has confirmed people living with HIV with undetectable viral loads cannot transmit the virus. GAYSTARNEWS-center_img The results of an Australian study has contributes to global evidence proving that when a HIV-positive partner is on daily antiretroviral therapy (ART) and has an undetectable viral load, the risk of sexual transmission to the HIV-negative partner is effectively zero.Called Opposites Attract, the study was led by led by the Kirby Institute at UNSW Sydney.‘Opposites Attract shows that HIV treatment as prevention works,’ said study project leader Dr Benjamin Bavinton‘Not only is this information vital to inform HIV prevention in gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men, it provides strong evidence to help dismantle some of the stigma still associated with HIV.’The original Opposites Attract findings were delivered to the IAS Conference on HIV Science in Paris last year. Yet another major a study has shown that Treatment as Prevention (TaSP) is a highly effective way of preventing HIV transmission between gay men. Not one case of HIV transmission from HIV positive gay men on effective treatmentScience trumps HIV stigma: ‘When we are undetectable we can’t pass the virus on’Funny video drives home HIV message: Undetectable = UntransmittableRead the full article on Gaystarnews:  :https://www.gaystarnews.com/article/heres-more-evidence-that-treatment-as-prevention-is-a-good-way-to-stop-hiv/last_img read more

Rep Lilly We must invest in local veteran service offices

first_img Categories: Lilly News 12Feb Rep. Lilly: We must invest in local veteran service offices Lawmaker is cosponsor for bill providing counties grants for veteran servicesState Rep. Jim Lilly of Park Township last week cosponsored legislation encouraging Michigan counties to establish and maintain veteran services through a new grant program.Under this legislation, each county with a veteran service office that satisfies pre-approved requirements would receive $25,000, plus an additional amount based on the number of veterans in the county. To continue receiving the grant, an established county veteran service office must meet benchmarks for staff performance and reporting while maintaining the previous year’s funding level.“We must ensure that our veterans are being taken care of,” Lilly said.  “Investing in local veteran service offices will give veterans, who have fought for our rights and freedom, the resources they need and deserve.”Under the current veteran’s benefits system, the state supplies the Veteran Service Coalition with a grant to provide benefit services to veterans. Depending on the county, a Veteran Service Officer may only be available for a few hours each month at a single location. This bill provides incentives to counties to develop or enhance a tool for providing sufficient services for veterans.House Bill 5536 was referred to the House Military and Veterans Affairs Committee.###last_img read more

Almost five million people in France watch TV dail

first_imgAlmost five million people in France watch TV daily via the internet, up by one million in a year, according to the latest data from audience research outfit Médiamétrie.Some 4.9 million individuals aged four and above watch TV programmes live or as catch up on internet screens, meaning via computers, tablets and smartphones, according to Médiamétrie.Over half of internet TV viewers are aged under 25, compared with 26% of the overall population. The 2.5 million under 25s viewing TV on the web is up buy a third from last year, with each watching an average of 1 hour 51 minutes online.The TV set remains by far the most popular screen for watching TV programmes, accounting for 96% of viewing time. However, whereas computers were the most important internet device for viewing shows, this year computers have been overtaken by mobile screens, which now account for 54% of online viewing time.About half the time spent watching internet-delivered TV is via channels’ websites and apps, with under 25s being more likely to watch content on online platforms such as YouTube or Daiulymotion, or the apps of OTT TV providers such as Molotov and MyCanal as well as pay TV operators’ apps and social media networks.last_img read more