Tag: 上海高级伴游

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppUnited States, September 22, 2017 – Miami, FL – …MARIA STILL PRODUCING 125-MPH WINDS AS IT PASSES NORTHEAST OF THE TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS…SUMMARY OF 1100 AM EDT…1500 UTC…INFORMATIONLOCATION…22.3N 71.0WABOUT 55 MI…90 KM N OF GRAND TURK ISLANDABOUT 445 MI…715 KM ESE OF NASSAUMAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS…125 MPH…205 KM/HPRESENT MOVEMENT…NW OR 325 DEGREES AT 8 MPH…13 KM/HMINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE…958 MB…28.29 INCHES WATCHES AND WARNINGSCHANGES WITH THIS ADVISORY:The government of the Dominican Republic has discontinued all warnings for the Dominican Republic.SUMMARY OF WATCHES AND WARNINGS IN EFFECT:A Hurricane Warning is in effect for…* Turks and Caicos Islands and the Southeastern BahamasA Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for…* Central BahamasA Hurricane Warning means that hurricane conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area.  Preparations to protect life and property should be rushed to completion.  A Tropical Storm Warning means that tropical storm conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area.  Interests elsewhere in the Bahamas should monitor the progress of Maria.  For storm information specific to your area, please monitor products issued by your national meteorological service.DISCUSSION AND 48-HOUR OUTLOOKAt 1100 AM EDT (1500 UTC), the eye of Hurricane Maria was located near latitude 22.3 North, longitude 71.0 West.  Maria is moving toward the northwest near 8 mph (13 km/h).  A turn toward the north-northwest is expected later today, followed by a turn toward the north by late Saturday.  On the forecast track, Maria’s core will move away from the Turks and Caicos Islands today, and pass northeast and east of the Bahamas through Sunday.Data from an Air Force Reserve Hurricane Hunter aircraft indicate that maximum sustained winds remain near 125 mph (205 km/h) with higher gusts.  Maria is a category 3 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.  A gradual weakening is forecast during the next 48 hours.   Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 70 miles (110 km) from the center, and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 160 miles (260 km).  The minimum central pressure based on data from the reconnaissance  aircraft is 958 mb (28.29 inches).HAZARDS AFFECTING LANDWIND:  Hurricane and tropical storm conditions are occurring over portions of the Turks and Caicos Islands and the southeastern Bahamas and will continue through tonight.  Tropical storm conditions are expected in the central Bahamas beginning tonight.STORM SURGE:  A dangerous storm surge accompanied by large and destructive waves will raise water levels by as much as 9 to 12 feet above normal tide levels within the hurricane warning area of the southeastern Bahamas and the Turks and Caicos Islands.RAINFALL:  Maria is expected to produce the following rainfall accumulations through Saturday:Turks and Caicos…8 to 16 inches, isolated 20 inchesPuerto Rico…additional 3 to 6 inches, isolated maximum storm total amounts 40 inchesEastern Dominican Republic…additional 4 to 8 inches, isolated storm total amounts 20 inchesWestern Dominican Republic and northern Haiti…additional 3 to 6 inchesMayaguana, southeast Bahamas…4 to 8 inchesInagua Islands and Crooked Island, Bahamas…2 to 6 inchesRest of eastern Bahamas…1 to 3 inchesRainfall on these islands will continue to cause life-threatening flash floods and mudslides.SURF:  Swells generated by Maria are affecting Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, the northern coast of Hispaniola, the Turks and Caicos Islands, and the Bahamas.  These swells will reach portions of the United States southeastern coast today and Bermuda tonight.   These swells are likely to cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions.  Please consult products from your local weather office.Release: NHC Related Items:center_img Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Here are highlights from the Wilmington Police Log for Wednesday, January 16, 2019:Police notified Water Department of water main break to service line of an Andover Street business. (1:31am)Police issued winter parking ban violations on Fiorenza Drive. (2:52am)An Evergreen Drive caller reported her rear windshield was broken sometime overnight. Police believe it occurred due to the weather. No obvious sign of malicious damage. (11:40am)Rachel M. Fitch (36, Billerica) was issued a summons for Operating A Motor Vehicle With A Revoked Or Suspended Registration; Uninsured Motor Vehicle; and Motor Vehicle Lights Violation. (11:58am)A Woburn Street resident reported an attempt was made unsuccessfully to open a credit card in his name. (2:18pm)A caller believes he witness a drug transaction in the parking lot of an Avalon Drive facility. Police found the call unfounded. (3:06pm)(DISCLAIMER: This information is public information.  An arrest does not constitute a conviction.  Any arrested person is innocent until proven guilty.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedPOLICE LOG for July 9: Police Issue 2 Summonses To Drivers; Windows Kicked In At BusinessIn “Police Log”POLICE LOG for August 12: 2 Drivers Issued Summonses; Drone FoundIn “Police Log”POLICE LOG for July 26: 2 Missing Teens; OUI Arrest; Main St. Shut Down Due To Crash; Road Rage IncidentIn “Police Log”last_img read more

first_img More information: Frédérique Valentin et al. Early Lapita skeletons from Vanuatu show Polynesian craniofacial shape: Implications for Remote Oceanic settlement and Lapita origins, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2015). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1516186113AbstractWith a cultural and linguistic origin in Island Southeast Asia the Lapita expansion is thought to have led ultimately to the Polynesian settlement of the east Polynesian region after a time of mixing/integration in north Melanesia and a nearly 2,000-y pause in West Polynesia. One of the major achievements of recent Lapita research in Vanuatu has been the discovery of the oldest cemetery found so far in the Pacific at Teouma on the south coast of Efate Island, opening up new prospects for the biological definition of the early settlers of the archipelago and of Remote Oceania in general. Using craniometric evidence from the skeletons in conjunction with archaeological data, we discuss here four debated issues: the Lapita–Asian connection, the degree of admixture, the Lapita–Polynesian connection, and the question of secondary population movement into Remote Oceania. Citation: Skulls in ancient cemetery on Vanuatu suggest Polynesians as first settlers (2015, December 29) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-12-skulls-ancient-cemetery-vanuatu-polynesians.html Explore further The researchers focused on skulls dug from the bottom of a cemetery on Efate Island, which has been dated back to approximately 3,000 years ago, making it the oldest in the South Pacific. The skulls, the team reports, belong to a people known as the Lapita, who are believed to have been the earliest settlers of the islands. The team compared the skulls with those of people currently living on the island and also other parts of Polynesia and Melanesia and concluded that the ancient skulls were closest in structure to modern Asians and Polynesians. This news came as a bit of a surprise because the current natives most resemble Melanesians. The researchers believe that the evidence suggests that Melanesia people arrived sometime after the Lapita had already populated the islands in the area and interbred with the people already living there.The researchers note that other evidence of the ancient Lapita people still exists as well—those living on the island share many cultural and linguistic similarities with early Polynesians, for example. But, they also add, it still doesn’t adequately address the issue of how it was that people living 3,000 years ago managed to navigate and populate an island group so far from their home—a path that would have taken them from South-East Asia through Melanesia and then into Polynesia, while somehow not leaving any evidence that they had mixed with the Melanesians. Their findings do suggest though, that the islands of Vanuatu may have served as a springboard of sorts, offering the early settlers a place to jump to other parts of the vast Pacific Ocean. Teouma Lapita skulls. Credit: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2015). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1516186113 (Phys.org)—A small team of researchers from France and Australia has found evidence in a very old cemetery (first discovered back in 2004) on one of the islands of Vanuatu that suggests that early Asians and Polynesians were the first human settlers, not Melanesians as many have suggested. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes how the question of the origin of the people of the Pacific Islands has confounded visitors from the west since perhaps the 16th century and why they believe their study finally provides the answers.center_img Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. South Pacific Island’s earliest inhabitants relied primarily on foraging, not horticulture © 2015 Phys.orglast_img read more

first_imgWhile age is known as the strongest risk factor for cognitive decline, eating a handful of nuts every day can improve mental health and memory skills by up to 60 per cent, finds a study. The findings showed that consuming nuts for a long period of time could be the key to better cognitive health, including improved thinking, reasoning and memory in older people. “By eating more than 10 grams (or two teaspoons) of nuts per day older people could improve their cognitive function by up to 60 per cent – compared to those not eating nuts – effectively warding off what would normally be experienced as a natural two-year cognition decline,” said lead researcher Ming Li from the University of South Australia. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThe reason could be because peanuts have specific anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects that help reduce cognitive decline including dementia. Nuts are also known to be high in healthy fats, protein and fibre with nutritional properties that can lower cholesterol. The study, published in The Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging, included 4,822 Chinese adults aged 55 and above. According to the World Health Organization, the number of people living with dementia globally is at 47 million. By 2030, this is projected to rise to 75 million and by 2050, global dementia cases are estimated to almost triple. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsive”Population ageing is one of the most substantial challenges of the twenty first century,” Li said. “Not only are people living longer…they naturally experience changes to conceptual reasoning, memory, and processing speed.While there is no cure for age-related cognition decline and neurogenerative disease, variations in what people eat are delivering improvements for older people.” “If we can find ways to help older people retain their cognitive health and independence for longer then this is absolutely worth the effort,” Li suggested.last_img read more