Tag: 苏州桑拿

Go back to the enewsletter British Airways has off

first_imgGo back to the enewsletterBritish Airways has officially opened the doors to a luxurious new First lounge at New York’s JFK Terminal 7 to gold cardholders and customers travelling in the airline’s First cabin on the airline’s most coveted route across the Atlantic. The space is the airline’s first long-haul lounge to showcase the new design direction already offered in Rome and Aberdeen, which will be rolled out across other destinations including Geneva, San Francisco and Johannesburg. The refurbishment forms part of a £52 million investment in the British Airways customer experience at JFK’s Terminal 7.At 60% larger than its predecessor, and covering more than 510 square metres, the lounge has been designed with thoughtfully tailored zones.A new wine room forms the centrepiece boasting an enomatic dispenser, which enables customers to enjoy wines at exactly the right temperature that have been oxidized to the correct level. Customers will also be able to enjoy “Flights of Wine”, a selection of different wines linked to a theme. The current theme is “Chardonnays of the World”.Other features include an opulent First bar with a wide range of premium beverages and a quiet work area. Customers can also dine in the airline’s upgraded dining room before they fly to maximise rest on their flight.A new boutique menu created by Executive chefs Gavin Mackenzie and Waylon Walker will include dishes influenced by the season, as well as a new ‘bowl food’ concept designed to offer customers a chance for a lighter option before they fly.The opening of British Airways’ new First lounge at Terminal 7 is one of a number of changes the airline has already made to improve the customer experience this year. The Concorde Room at JFK for First customers was refreshed earlier this year and customers flying in First and Club World now also enjoy an enhanced check-in experience at the exclusive new Premium Zone, with direct access to Fast Track security. The new First Wing and First check-in are also open to ensure a smooth start to the journey.British Airways will complete its refurbishment of Terminal 7 in 2019, after the upgrade of the Galleries (Business class) lounge has been completed.Go back to the enewsletterlast_img read more

Rep Hornberger votes to approve recreational projects

first_img Bill funds development of local paddle parkState Rep. Pamela Hornberger on Thursday joined her colleagues in voting for legislation to fund dozens of recreation projects across the state, using Michigan Natural Resources Trust Fund money with local matching funds.Hornberger, of Chesterfield Township, said the improvements, developments and land acquisitions use dedicated money for such projects to fund projects at parks, trails and other recreational facilities across the state.The $379,000 project will pay for a development to transform 3.14 acres of property into Chesterfield Township’s first paddle park. The project will develop the Webber Paddle Park with the following amenities: parking lot for paddlers with accessible parking space, parking lot with access to the fishing pier with accessible parking space, universally accessible fishing pier and accessible kayak launch with 10-foot wide route to launch to accommodate a two-person carry to the launch, picnic shelter and restrooms. When the project is complete, this park will give the public access via non-motorized watercraft to the Salt River and Lake St. Clair.“We have so many natural resources in our state, and this development will give families, outdoor lovers and tourists more opportunities to enjoy our local waterways,” Hornberger said. “Development of this park will give people access to fishing, family picnics, kayaking, canoeing and more.”The funding is comprised of revenue from the lease of state land and is designated on an annual basis in partnership with local governments for the projects.The bill now goes to the Senate for consideration.#####The bill is Senate Bill 76. Categories: Hornberger News,News 16Jun Rep. Hornberger votes to approve recreational projectslast_img read more

Nonprofits Advocate for Changes to TANF as Congress Considers Reauthorization

first_imgShare21TweetShare4Email25 Shares August 20, 2015; Center for Budget and Policy PrioritiesMany of your younger colleagues might shrug at the mention of a program called Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), but that was the formal name for “welfare” support for families. Nineteen years ago, the federal welfare reform legislation of 1996 that came out of the Republican Congress led by Speaker Newt Gingrich and the Democratic White House under President Bill Clinton replaced AFDC with Temporary Aid to Needy Families (TANF).Like much of social policy caught in the scrum between the White House and a gridlocked Congress, TANF hasn’t been formally gone through a full reauthorization since 2005. Rather, it has chugged or stumbled along on with short-term extensions since 2010.The two nonprofit sources of essential information on TANF—its problems, prospects, and current status in Congress—are the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP) and the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP). Writing for CBPP, Liz Schott calls on Congress to make some improvements in TANF because the program “serves few poor families with children and hasn’t provided an effective safety net that could give poor children an opportunity to succeed in school and life.”The notion behind the welfare reform transformation from AFDC to TANF was supposed to be a focus on work, but Schott points out that “in reality, states invest few TANF funds in preparing parents for work or helping them obtain good jobs. State efforts related to work activities often focus on documenting and measuring participation in a limited set of activities—those that often are a mismatch for the skills employers need and the training and education that could help TANF families most.”Schott’s several recommendations for TANF reform include:“Shift the focus from engaging recipients in activities to improving employment outcomes.” By this, Schott is referring to the generation and use of measures that look at whether TANF recipients participate in activities that help them get and keep jobs, not simply whether they are simply engaged in a requisite number of hours in employment-related activities.“Put basic education and skills training on par with other work activities.” Schott observes that “many TANF recipients lack basic skills and education to compete in today’s labor market”—that is, the skills that employers need. She indicates that the current TANF work participation rate measure “discourages states from allowing and supporting successful participation in basic education or skills training programs.”“Support alternate pathways to work for individuals with the greatest barriers.” By this, Schott is recognizing that “many TANF recipients face significant barriers to employment, including mental and physical health issues that limit their employment prospects,” but there is little in TANF that addresses their personal or family issues.“Redirect staffing resources from documenting participation to helping parents be successful at work.” Too much of TANF is focused on complex and confusing work and verification requirements when TANF recipients and TANF staff would find their time better spent “providing real assistance to families seeking to move from welfare to work.”“Shift incentives from reducing caseloads to providing access to TANF to ensure opportunity for all.” In the current political environment, it seems that politicians and program administrators like to show reduced caseloads, even if it means pushing people off the TANF rolls, rather than demonstrate success in helping TANF recipients deal with the hardship of poverty. Schott notes that in 2013, the ratio of families in poverty receiving TANF cash benefits was just 26 for every 100 compared to 68 out of every 100 poor families in 2006, and in 10 states, fewer than 10 out of every 100 poor families receives TANF cash assistance. She argues that Congress shouldn’t simply reward states for reducing TANF caseloads no matter how they do it.“Target state and federal TANF funding to core welfare reform purposes.” Schott argues that “core welfare reform” areas such as support for child care and other work supports and basic assistance account for less than half of federal and state TANF assistance and only 25 percent or less of TANF expenditures in eight states. She suggests a 50 percent minimum floor requirement on TANF expenditures on theses core welfare purposes.This CBPP analysis has significant areas of overlap with the testimony from Elizabeth Lower-Basch of CLASP submitted to the Ways and Means Committee on TANF reauthorization. Much of what Schott recommended actually reflects her analysis, shared by Lower-Basch, that TANF should be brought into better alignment with the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). Lower-Basch also recommends other improvements to better connect TANF with other programs, specifically the Child Care Development Block Grant (CCDBC). Her testimony includes concern with states’ efforts (and Congressional endorsement) for caseload reduction aimed at reducing cash assistance caseloads regardless of need and other incentives that do not lead to programs that are more effective in helping TANF recipients deal with and overcome financial hardships.Congress will be debating the elements of the TANF reauthorization when it returns from its August recess after Labor Day. Changing the rules and regulations of TANF may be important, especially with the inclusion as members of Congress seem to support, with more focus on crafting individual opportunity plans for TANF recipients. However, as Charles Lewis of the Congressional Research Institute on Social Work and Policy notes, “the basic (TANF) block grant—set at $16.5 billion since 1996 has not been increased and as a result has lost one-third of its value due to inflation.” In the hands of a budget-cutting, Republican-led Congress, TANF needs more than changes in measures and procedures, and nonprofits concerned about low-income families have to make sure their voices are heard.—Rick CohenShare21TweetShare4Email25 Shareslast_img read more

first_img Skyharbour Resources Ltd. (TSX.V: SYH) owns a 100% interest in approximately 400,000 acres of land between seven uranium properties in the uranium rich Athabasca Basin region in northern Saskatchewan. Six of the properties consisting of approximately 388,000 acres of prospective ground are strategically located near the Alpha Minerals (TSX.V: AMW) and Fission Energy (TSX.V: FIS) Patterson Lake South (PLS) uranium discovery area. The properties were acquired for their proximity to the PLS discovery and interpreted favourable geology for the occurrence of PLS style uranium mineralization. Skyharbour’s land position is now one of the largest in the Patterson Lake area. The Athabasca Basin hosts the world’s largest and richest high-grade uranium deposits accounting for approximately 20% of global primary uranium supply. There are still areas in the region that are highly prospective and underexplored as illustrated by the new 49.5 metres of 6.26% U3O8 discovery at the Patterson Lake South property. Please visit our website for more information. The dollar index closed at 82.47 on Friday…and gapped down a bit at the Sunday night open in New York…and then kept heading lower from there.  The low tick [82.05] came minutes after 8:00 a.m. in New York…and the subsequent 25 basis point rally ended at noon…and that gain had all but disappeared by the close.  The index finished the Monday session at 82.14…down 33 basis points from Friday’s close. Here’s the New York Spot Silver [Bid] chart on its own, so you can observe the New York action…the only price action that really matters…more closely. (Click on image to enlarge) The CME’s Daily Delivery Report, not surprisingly, showed that there were no more deliveries scheduled for the month of April…but they did report the First Notice Day numbers for delivery into the May silver contract very late last night EDT…and they were quite amazing. In gold, there were 1,288 contracts posted for delivery on May 1st, with all but six of them being issued by JPMorgan Chase…1,116 out of its client account…and the other 166 out of its in-house [proprietary] trading account.  The only two long/stoppers of note were Canada’s Bank of Nova Scotia with 973 contracts…and Barclays with 287. In silver, of the 1,506 contracts posted for delivery tomorrow, the only short/issuer worth mentioning was JPMorgan Chase with 1,484 contracts out of its in-house [proprietary] trading account.  The biggest long/stopper was JPMorgan in its client account, with 573 contracts.  The next three long/stoppers in order of size were Canada’s Bank of Nova Scotia, Credit Suisse and Merrill…with 233, 208 and 153 contracts respectively.  There were a couple of dozen long/stoppers in all…and yesterday’s Issuers and Stoppers Report is definitely worth a minute of your time.  The link is here.  Even though the gold price has rebounded smartly off its low of a week ago Tuesday morning Hong Kong time, the metal itself still continues to depart GLD for parts unknown.  On Monday an authorized participant withdrew 77,367 troy ounces.  This should not be the case at all…as gold should be flowing into GLD.  Over at SLV, they reported their third deposit by an authorized participant in as many days. This time it was 482,931 troy ounces. The U.S. Mint had another sales report yesterday.  They sold 1,000 ounces of gold eagles…and 1,000 one-ounce 24K gold buffaloes.  I expected more…much more.  After three days of no silver eagles sales, they finally reported selling 743,500 of them.  I will be very interested to see if they have a sales report today that shoves April silver eagles sales over the four million mark.  With one day short of a third of the 2013 calendar year under our collective belts, silver eagles sales sit at 18,198,500.  That’s a lot! Over at the Comex-approved depositories on Friday, they reported receiving 598,743 troy ounces of silver…and shipped 686,718 troy ounces of the stuff out the door.  The link to that activity is here. In gold on Friday, the Comex-approved depositories reported receiving 49,194 troy ounces of the stuff…and shipped 66,885 troy ounces out the door.  All the activity was at Scotia Mocatta…and the link to that is here. I thought that Monday might be a little quieter at the store, but it certainly didn’t turn out that way, as we had another huge sales day…almost all of it in silver.  Since the engineered price decline of two weeks ago…and except for a couple of stand-out days…silver has outsold gold about 200 to 1…minimum. There have been no changes in delivery…but because of a personal relationship, our store has been able to order a bit of stock from one our wholesalers…but nothing like we’d like to order if given half a chance. I read Ted Butler’s weekend commentary with great interest…and have permission to reprint the last two paragraphs from it.  Here they are… I am taken aback by the growing pervasiveness, more on the Internet, but also in the mainstream media of stories about silver having to do with the COMEX, short positions, manipulation, the COTs and how JPMorgan is the big silver short. Please try to understand how other-worldly this all is to me. I’m not trying to pat myself on the back in having introduced all these things (and others); I’m trying to convey that the ascension of these issues to the forefront seems to me to automatically increase the likelihood that the end of the silver manipulation is drawing near. After all, at some point, the whole scam must unravel once we pass the critical mass of public awareness. It is this growing awareness of the real issues in silver that has me both thunderstruck and more encouraged than ever before about silver’s investment prospects. We have a wildly bullish COT structure in silver and gold combined with what could be a nuclear fire emerging in silver physical demand. I don’t recall such a similar bullish price set up. JPMorgan is still a manipulative force to reckon with, but the growing spotlight on this crooked bank and the crooked exchange on which the price of silver is set, is bright…and this doesn’t bode well for the crooks. – Silver analyst Ted Butler…27 April 2013 Here’s your “cute quota” for the day… The gold stocks gapped up about 3 percent at the open…and then got sold off into that early London p.m. gold fix which I had mentioned a few paragraphs back.  The high for the gold stocks came at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time…and then slid in fits and starts into the close.  The HUI finished the day up 1.62%. All four of them would have broken out to the upside if given the opportunity to do so. It was a pretty unexciting Monday in the gold market.  Prices chopped higher, with the high tick of the day coming moments before the 8:20 a.m. Comex open…and from there it got sold down to its New York low at the London p.m. gold fix.  From there it chopped higher into the 5:15 p.m. electronic close.  Gold’s high tick came in late electronic trading…and was recorded by Kitco as $1,477.80 spot.  The low at the p.m. fix was $1,462.50 spot. Gold close yesterday at $1,476.50 spot…up $13.60 on the day.  Gross volume was not overly heavy at around 144,000 contracts. Both platinum and palladium did pretty well for themselves…but it was obvious, at least to me, that there was a willing seller there to keep things under control less their respective prices rose to fast. The platinum chart for both Monday and Friday appear too similar to be a coincidence, but maybe it’s just me [once again] looking for black bears in dark rooms that aren’t there. Here are the charts for both…and you can decide for yourself. Sponsor Advertisement It was more or less the same story in silver, except for the fact that there was a surprise rally late in the electronic trading session, which got capped before it could get too far above the $24.60 spot mark…and from there it traded sideways into the close.  Silver’s high tick was $24.71 spot in electronic trading…its New York low was at what appeared to be an early London p.m. gold fix…and that was recorded as $24.01 spot. Silver closed at $24.59 spot…up 55 cents the ounce from Friday’s close.  Net volume was pretty chunky at 44,000 contracts…with more than half of that coming in the new front month, which is July. The silver stocks didn’t do quite as well as the gold stocks…and I’m sure part of that reason had to do with the fact that the big price surge in silver came after the close of the equity markets in New York.  Nick Laird’s Intraday Silver Sentiment Index closed up 0.74%. Since it’s Tuesday, I have a quite a few more stories than normal…and I hope you can find the time to read the ones that interest you the most. There are no market anymore…only interventions. – Chris Powell, GATA It was a very uneventful Monday in the precious metals…and they were kept quietly under control during the New York session.  All four of them would have broken out to the upside if given the opportunity to do so, which they weren’t.  With today being the last trading day of April, I’m not expecting big fireworks as far as the price is concerned, but you just never know. Today, at the close of Comex trading, is also the cut-off for this Friday’s Commitment of Traders Report. I don’t have much to add to what I’ve already said in the first section of today’s column…and the stories in today’s column should keep you off the streets for a while. I note that both gold and silver came under some selling pressure during the Far East trading session on their Tuesday…with the biggest percentage move down coming in silver, of course.  Lows were set in all four precious metals shortly after 2:00 p.m. Hong Kong time…but rallied back sharply about an hour into the London trading day.  Ted Butler says that most trading activity these days is of the high-frequency variety…and there’s no real liquidity in these markets, so ‘day boyz’ can do pretty much what they want with prices. Both gold and silver are still below their Monday closing prices as I hit the ‘send’ button on today’s column at 5:10 a.m. Eastern time…and platinum and palladium prices are unchanged.  Volumes are quite a bit higher than ‘normal’…and virtually all of silver’s volume is in the new front month, which is July.  The dollar index isn’t doing much. Just a quick reminder that TODAY at 2 p.m. EDT, Casey Research be premiering our Internationalizing Your Assets video event, with Doug Casey, Peter Schiff, Mike Maloney, and other experts on expatriating your wealth. If you have any interest at all on how to protect what’s rightfully yours from increasingly belligerent and overreaching governments, I urge you to register now for this free event, and learn for yourself how this fast-moving field is changing and why now may be one of the last chances you have to get started. Enjoy what’s left of your day…and I’ll see you here tomorrow.last_img read more

Damning new evidence suggests that senior figures

first_imgDamning new evidence suggests that senior figures in the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) covered up a coroner’s warning about the grave dangers posed by a new disability assessment.Disability News Service (DNS) has seen a series of letters that suggest the department was given all the information it needed to carry out an urgent review of the safety of aspects of the work capability assessment (WCA) in 2010.But that review – ordered by coroner Tom Osborne through a process known as a Rule 43 letter – appears never to have been carried out.Osborne wrote to the department on 30 March 2010 – originally addressing his concerns to Labour work and pensions secretary Yvette Cooper – just a few days before the start of the general election campaign.His letter followed an inquest he had carried out into the death of 41-year-old Stephen Carre (pictured), from Eaton Bray, Bedfordshire, who had taken his own life in January 2010*.On 4 May, Osborne received an initial response from the DWP’s most senior civil servant, its permanent secretary, Sir Leigh Lewis.When DNS first revealed the existence of the Rule 43 letter last month, DWP claimed in a statement that it had responded to the coroner on 4 May 2010.But DNS has now seen the 4 May letter, and it merely outlines departmental procedures on the WCA, provides brief details from Stephen Carre’s assessment, and asks the coroner for medical information about the case.Sir Leigh promises that this further information will allow him to “complete our investigation and review our existing procedures, as you have asked, to determine the need for any changes to our current medical evidence gathering process”.Three further letters written by the coroner show that he provided the information requested by Sir Leigh, but never received a response from DWP to his Rule 43 report.On 12 May 2010, Osborne advised Sir Leigh that DWP did not need to investigate the circumstances surrounding Stephen Carre’s death, as that had already taken place at the inquest.He said DWP needed instead to look at the “use of medical evidence when determining entitlement of benefit of those patients who are suffering from a psychiatric illness”, but he still offered to send Sir Leigh a transcript of the inquest evidence.On 3 August, Osborne sent him the inquest transcript, apparently in response to a request from the department.Two months later, on 6 October 2010, Osborne wrote to Peter Carre, Stephen’s father, to tell him that he had yet to receive a “substantive response” to his Rule 43 letter, and promising to contact him if he did.Peter Carre did not hear from the coroner again until after he was contacted by DNS last month, more than five years after Osborne’s last letter.Carre told DNS that he believed the lives of other people with mental health conditions like his son could have been saved if DWP had acted on the coroner’s Rule 43 letter in 2010.He said Osborne told him in 2010 that DWP should have replied to the Rule 43 letter, but there was nothing he could do if they failed to do so.Carre said: “It was an opportunity to do something, and it was missed. They should be held accountable for their action, or lack of it.“That would be the one thing I would say: that the people who were there and are still there should still be accountable for their lack of action.”The letters are important because at the time they were being exchanged, the newly-appointed Conservative work and pensions secretary, Iain Duncan Smith, and his employment minister Chris Grayling, were finalising plans to roll out the WCA the following year to hundreds of thousands of existing claimants of incapacity benefit (IB), many of them with mental health conditions.And in the summer of 2010, Grayling appointed Professor Malcolm Harrington to carry out an independent review of the “fairness and effectiveness” of the WCA, and later told him that he wanted to go ahead with plans to roll out the assessment, despite Harrington suggesting that this should be delayed by a year.Harrington has told DNS that he believes he was never shown the coroner’s Rule 43 letter.More than three years later, another coroner wrote an almost identical letter warning of similar concerns about the safety of the WCA, this time after the death of a north London man, Michael O’Sullivan, who also took his own life after being found fit for work after a WCA.Last month, new research concluded that the programme to reassess people claiming IB using the WCA could have caused 590 suicides in just three years.And last week, a former government adviser told DNS how ministers and civil servants were “ruthless” and “reckless” in forcing through their new “fitness for work” test and refusing to abandon it even after they were told of the harm it was causing.Even before the emergence of the latest letters, disabled activists had called for Duncan Smith and Grayling to face a criminal investigation over the alleged cover-up.This week, more than five weeks after the existence of the Rule 43 letter was first brought to DWP’s attention, a spokeswoman for the department said in response to a series of questions from DNS that “because this issue happened more than five years ago we simply don’t have access to the information you’re seeking”.  She added: “Therefore, I think the best route for your line of inquiry is an FOI [request under the Freedom of Information Act]. And we’ll be happy to provide a formal statement once that FOI process is complete.”*Osborne ruled that the trigger for Stephen Carre’s suicide had been DWP’s rejection of his appeal against being found “fit for work”, and he called in his Rule 43 letter for a review of the policy not to seek medical evidence from a GP or psychiatrist if the claimant has a mental health condition. Neither the Atos assessor who assessed Carre, nor the DWP decision-maker who subsequently decided that he was fit for work and therefore ineligible for the new employment and support allowance, had sought information from his GP, his community psychiatric nurse or his psychiatrist.last_img read more

first_img 10 min read This story originally appeared on Business Insider Steve Kovach June 5, 2017 Image credit: Samantha Lee/Business Insider iPad sales have been declining since 2013. Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. –shares The iPad Was Supposed to Revolutionize News, Books and Computers. So What Happened? Add to Queue A few months after Steve Jobs introduced the iPad to the world, a device he called “magical and revolutionary” onstage, there was a team visiting Apple headquarters working to find ways to live up to that description. When the tablet came out in 2010, some people weren’t sure what to use it for. Apple had to demonstrate how you could lean back on a couch and read or watch a show, in a way that didn’t make sense on a laptop or a phone.This team was scrambling to create something brand new for the iPad ahead of a splashy launch in New York. But the team didn’t work for Apple; they worked for Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp., and under the close watch of Jobs and Apple’s iPad team, they were trying to create the first newspaper designed specifically for a tablet.The app would be called The Daily, and it looked like a tabloid come to life, with animated graphics and videos.”There were regular visits to Cupertino where we showed them new prototypes,” Jon Dobrowolski, who worked on The Daily as the head of product, said in an interview with Business Insider. “They would help us work through complex problems. We were doing things that hadn’t pushed the iPad that far.”It was clear Apple wanted The Daily to be a success as much as News Corp did. Jobs provided feedback on early versions of the app. There was a sense within News Corp. that Jobs would’ve been even more involved with the project if his health hadn’t started to seriously decline around the same time The Daily was gearing up to launch, Dobrowolski said.It would’ve been the ultimate proof that the iPad had a purpose, even if that purpose was a bit muddy at launch. As the iPod changed music industry and the iPhone changed telecommunications, the iPad would change news and publishing.In February 2011, a little more than a year after the original iPad launched, Murdoch, gathered a scrum of media and tech reporters at the Guggenheim in New York to unveil what he believed would be a transformative way to get news.Rupert Murdoch introduced The Daily in New York in 2010.Image credit: News Corp.For 99 cents a week or $39.99 a year, subscribers to The Daily would get an interactive reimagining of a daily news publication, full of interactive charts, video and other electronic goodies along with high-quality journalism from a newsroom packed with editors and reporters with impressive résumés.Apple’s iTunes boss at the time, Eddy Cue, was onstage as well, promoting the App Store’s new subscription model and giving his blessing to The Daily. He called the iPad a new category of device and boasted about the growing ecosystem of apps for it.”The iPad demands we rethink our craft,” Murdoch said from the stage.The Daily shut down less than two years later.It was the first sign that the promise of the iPad — that it would upend industries like book publishing, education, the news media and even video entertainment — would not come to pass. iPad sales have been in free fall since 2013. Ebook sales are plummeting by double-digit percentages as print books show a surprising renewed growth. Digital publishers have found more success on Facebook and other digital platforms, not tying their futures to one gadget. And despite a push to reinvent textbook publishing, Apple failed to make a dent in an industry controlled by big publishers.”The role of the iPad was probably vaguer than any product Apple launched,” said Jan Dawson, chief analyst at Jackdaw Research. “It wasn’t well defined.”And Apple is still trying to figure it out.This week, Apple will host its annual World Wide Developers Conference (WWDC), where it shows off new versions of the software that powers its products. There are also rumblings that we might get a look at a new iPad Pro model with a 10.5-inch screen and shrunken-down bezels aimed at transforming the iPad from a media-consumption device to one that could replace your laptop.But even Apple’s biggest fans have had doubts the iPad can be the new kind of computer the company wants it to be, and the onus is on Apple this week to put the tools in place to make it happen or risk failing to deliver on yet another promise.iPad sales have been declining since 2013.Publishing revolution?Even the support from Apple couldn’t save The Daily, and it’s a useful lesson in why some of the early hopes for the iPad never panned out.From the beginning, the app was plagued with bugs and crashes, which Dobrowolski blamed on the fact that the iPad was still essentially running software and chips designed for a phone.The production process wasn’t as easy as News Corp. thought it’d be. When The Daily launched, News Corp. executives claimed they’d save on overhead costs and production time because they didn’t have to print and deliver a physical newspaper. Each issue would magically show up on subscribers’ iPads instead.ScreenshotThe reality: It took a lot more work to produce each edition of The Daily than originally thought.Dobrowolski said the team would often work from 10 a.m. until 4 a.m. the next day, trying to get each issue out on time, wrestling with graphics and layout for both vertical and horizontal positions formats.It turned out that iPad publishing was a tricky process, and, in the end, the subscribers simply weren’t there, forcing The Daily to announce it was shutting down in December 2012, not even two years after its debut.No one tried anything on that scale again. The Daily was the most ambitious, but it wasn’t alone. Condé Nast and other major magazine publishers made efforts to transfer their portfolio of magazines to the iPad. But all those additional videos, graphics and animations could take up to a few gigabytes of memory with each issue, which turned out to be a bad experience since iPads had a measly 16 gigs to start with. Others were just PDF versions of the print magazine. Hardly revolutionary.After The Daily’s failure, Apple tried in 2012 to take on the lucrative textbook industry with another high-profile event in New York, the heart of the publishing industry. The company debuted iBooks 2, a new ebooks app that featured digital, interactive textbooks from a few major publishers. But Apple fell largely silent about its ambitions to “reinvent the textbook” after the event, and there’s scant evidence that publishers have embraced iBooks over print.”Apple hasn’t disrupted the textbook market at all,” Dawson said. “Textbooks are a very high-margin business for publishers, and there’s little incentive for them to sell on the iPad. Without having them on board it’s really hard to disrupt a market like that.”A new kind of computerApple now pitches the iPad as a device that can replace your laptop.Image credit: Tech Insider/Steve KovachBy the following year, the iPad saw its first sales decline, and it hasn’t recovered since. There were many factors to blame. Some said it was because people realized you don’t need to upgrade your iPad every year or two like you do with the iPhone. Others said Apple’s introduction of the big-screen iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus ate into iPad sales.So now we’re in the middle of another promise: The iPad as a laptop replacement. In 2015, Apple introduced the iPad Pro, adding more power, a larger screen and new capabilities thanks to a snap-on keyboard cover and $99 stylus called the Apple Pencil. CEO Tim Cook claimed in an interview before the Pro’s launch that the iPad Pro could do enough to replace a laptop.It was a remarkable pivot and the first time Apple explicitly claimed it had made a new kind of computer. Jobs and other Apple executives had always talked about the long-term prospects of the iPad as a new kind of PC, but the iPad Pro was the first model in the product’s five years that was being marketed that way.But critics, including some of Apple’s biggest defenders, aren’t totally buying it. Pro-Apple writer John Gruber wrote a long critique about the keyboard cover. “Trying to use the iPad Pro as a laptop with the Smart Keyboard exposes the seams of an OS that was clearly designed for touchscreen use first,” he wrote.Recode’s Walt Mossberg put it more bluntly, saying “because Apple hasn’t made a great keyboard, the iPad Pro isn’t a complete replacement for a great laptop like the MacBook Air.”It’s not just the hardware. While some apps like Microsoft Office have made it to the iPad, it’s still missing other essential productivity apps that could truly make it a laptop replacement. Much of the iPad app ecosystem is still populated with jumbo-sized iPhone apps, not the reimagined apps needed to take advantage of more screen space and extra power. The iPad’s split-screen feature helps a little, but it’s not enough.The benefits would be enormous — a device as powerful and capable as a laptop but packed in an ultrathin, portable package. No one has cracked that yet.”The big challenge is how to evolve iOS on an iPad in a way that feels natural in that setting,” Dawson said. “Apple has a tricky balancing act.”So now the pressure is on Apple to figure out where the iPad fits in. The iPad is far from a flop — any of Apple’s rivals would kill to have a product that sells around 10 million units per quarter — but it still hasn’t found a distinct purpose within Apple’s hardware ecosystem.While the iPad made a great consumption device, it failed to disrupt the media and publishing industries that Apple and its early partners first imagined. And in the nearly two years since the iPad Pro’s debut, it’s unclear how successful Apple can be with its next major promise: turning the iPad into a dream device that replaces your laptop altogether.As WWDC approaches, some are already speculating what Apple could do to take the iPad to the next level. (Scott Stein of CNET has a good piece on that very topic, where he suggests revamping the home screen, improving the Safari browser and more. It’s worth a read.) And if we do see new hardware, it’ll have to address the qualms critics have had with the keyboard.The iPad has proved itself to be magical and successful. The next step is to prove it can be revolutionary. Apple Next Article Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals Register Now »last_img read more

first_img Add to Queue Google CEO Sundar Pichai Confirms Censored China Search Engine Image credit: Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images for Wired25 via engadget This story originally appeared on Engadget Register Now » Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business Google Next Article He said its development is going very well. 2 min read October 16, 2018 When Google’s chief privacy officer admitted to the Senate that the company is working on a secret project called ‘Dragonfly,’ he refused to say what it is. According to previous reports, Dragonfly is the code name for the censored search engine Google has been developing for China since 2017 — a search engine that can automatically identify websites banned by the country’s infamous firewall and can remove them from the results page. Now, Google chief Sundar Pichai has openly confirmed the search engine’s existence at the Wired 25 Summit and even told the audience that its development is going very well.”It turns out we’ll be able to serve well over 99 percent of the queries,” he said onstage. The executive defended the project, telling people that Google is “compelled by [its] mission [to] provide information to everyone,” but it also has to follow the laws in every country. China serves as home to 20 percent of the world’s population, after all, and its absence in the nation means it’s missing out on such a huge number of potential users.Pichai said that there are many areas where Google could provide “information better than what’s available” to people in China. The search engine could lead to reliable cancer treatment info, for instance, instead of the fake information they might be getting elsewhere.The Google CEO also said during the event that the company re-evaluated its choice to pull out of China a few years ago, calling the country a wonderful and innovative market. “We wanted to learn what it would look like if we were in China, so that’s what we built internally,” he said. “Given how important the market is and how many users there are, we feel obliged to think hard about this problem and take a longer-term view.”Pichai seems to stand by the company’s decision to develop the censored search engine, even though employees are pushing back and demanding more transparency. He didn’t say when the product would launch, but when it was first reported in August, sources said it could be ready within six to nine months. –shares Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. Mariella Moonlast_img read more

first_imgEquifax Announces New Chief Communications Officer PRNewswireJune 5, 2019, 10:22 pmJune 5, 2019 Additionally, she helped drive the strategy for a new corporate narrative and created top-tier media opportunities to tell the company’s evolution story. Her global experience includes leading communications in Coca-Cola’s South and East Africa business unit, where she created a stakeholder strategy in a difficult and highly regulated environment.Marketing Technology News: CloudSense and Ad-Juster Work Together to Maximize End-to-End Ad Campaign Efficiency and Profitability“Equifax is in the midst of a game-changing evolution, and how our story is presented internally and externally is paramount to our success with stakeholders,” said Mark W. Begor, CEO, Equifax. “Amanda has the experience and expertise to help Equifax craft and project its narrative in a way that’s accurate and fair, and I’m excited to have her global background on the team.”Marketing Technology News: SDI Marketing Set to Fly High with Launch of New Stand-Alone Loyalty Agency, kitePrior to corporate communications, Rosseter was a journalist at leading media outlets, serving as a news correspondent, anchor and investigative reporter at CNN and at affiliates of NBC and ABC in Boston and Atlanta. As an award-winning journalist, Rosseter has earned Emmy awards, Edward R. Murrow awards and a Columbia University DuPont baton for investigative journalism. She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in broadcast journalism from The University of Georgia.Marketing Technology News: Pernix Launches Attribution Application Solution to Brings Full Transparency to Performance Marketing Programs Rosseter is a communications leader with more than 25 years in external communications and global media engagement. Most recently, she led global external communications and media for The Coca-Cola Company, where she served in a number of roles, including Global Group Director of Strategic Communications and Public Affairs. Her accomplishments include leading the communications launch of a new business strategy to 17 business units across 200+ countries and territories as well as to media, external stakeholders and analysts. Equifax Inc. has named Amanda Rosseter to its new Chief Communications Officer position, where she will lead corporate, executive and transformation communications, and will serve on the CEO’s extended senior leadership team.center_img Amanda Rosseter to Lead Global Communications Strategy Amanda RosseterCoca ColaEquifaxglobal media engagementMark W. BegorMarketing Technology NewsNews Previous ArticleIndustry-Leading Sales Enablement Platform Scoops $60 Million Series DNext ArticlePicMonkey Launches Real-Time Collaboration Features, Empowers People to Create Togetherlast_img read more

first_imgTextmunication Announces Agreement to Integrate SMS with Deep Sky Mobile VoIP Platform Business WireJune 24, 2019, 6:06 pmJune 24, 2019 cloud-based communicationMarketing TechnologyMemorandum of UnderstandingNewsRCSSky VoIP PlatformTextmunication Holdings Previous ArticleActiveViam Receives Investment from Guidepost Growth EquityNext ArticleCloudscene Launches Enterprise Tool to Find Cloud Connectivity Routes Worldwide Textmunication Holdings, Inc., a cloud-based communication technology holding company, announced it has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to integrate SMS into Deep Sky VoIP Platform.“Top 20 Most Promising Digital Marketing Solution Providers”The Company is pleased to announce it has signed a MOU with Deep Sky Mobile to collaborate on the development of SMS and VoIP enabled projects for the commercial market.Along with Deep Sky’s VoIP and IoT services, our proprietary SAM platform which is capable of sending over 1 Billion SMS or RCS messages per month, could provide the infrastructure to build a network or Cloud and API applications that could be beneficial to both companies.RCS Integration We will explore the integration of Rich Communication Services (RCS) service within their suite of products. RCS is a communication protocol aimed at replacing SMS messages with a text-message system that is richer, provides interactivity and can transmit in-call multimedia. RCS has received strong backing from Google – and more recently from Samsung and Verizon who have also started implementing the RCS protocol.Recent GSMA (Global System for Mobile Communications) estimates indicate the RCS market will be worth $74 billion by 2021, with estimates that 86% of all smartphones will be RCS-enabled by 2020.Marketing Technology News: Yext Study: 58% Of Healthcare and Pharmaceutical Marketers Say Their Marketing Management Strategy Needs Major ImprovementsSMS Integration with IoT The Company will also work on integrating SMS in Deep Sky Internet of Things (IoT) Platform, which provides a cloud solution for industrial IoT (IIoT) clients to monitor critical assets and equipment in real-time.The integration of SMS will provide organizations with time-sensitive information on which to make critical decisions, and enhance Deep Sky’s IoT platform for enterprise clients requiring that data.AI and Data Analytics We will also work on developing an Artificial Intelligence and Data Analytics cloud on which we can build “big data” solutions utilizing the information collected on both the SMS, IoT and VoIP platforms to provide next-generation service to customers.Wais Asefi, the CEO of Textmunication commented, “We are excited to announce our collaboration with Deep Sky in integrating our SMS and RCS technology along with their VoIP service. This vision won’t be done overnight, but we believe through our combination of technologies, and expertise, we now have the ability to build both companies in the enterprise service market.”Marketing Technology News: PMG Launches Marketing Intelligence Platform — Meet AlliInvestor Mailing ListIf interested in receiving investor updates on Deep Sky Mobile register onlineText SWRM to short code 52236 to sign-up for news alerts and announcements via SMS for Deep Sky MobileMarketing Technology News: Top of Mind Networks Adds BombBomb Integration to Surefire CRMlast_img read more

first_img Source:http://newsstand.clemson.edu/mediarelations/clemson-researcher-warns-of-spread-of-homemade-steroids/ Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Oct 4 2018A Clemson University researcher recently published insights into homemade steroids and steroid trafficking through a study of federal court cases. The research details why homemade steroids became popular and how online tools and cryptocurrency have allowed for their rapid spread.Bryan Denham, Campbell Professor of Sports Communication in Clemson’s communication department, recently published the research in Contemporary Drug Problems. Considering the impact of these homemade drugs has been felt nationwide, Denham said it is imperative that athletes at all levels in every sport realize what they can easily get online may still be putting their athletics careers — and their lives — in jeopardy.”From the standpoint of public health, purchasers of black-market steroids should understand that while homebrewers may produce actual steroids, the substances may contain unintended contaminants and inconsistent levels of active ingredients,” Denham said. “In that regard, purchasing steroids is no different than buying other illicit substances, especially on the Internet.”Denham’s research examined 63 cases involving 184 defendants in 41 U.S. District Courts across a five-year period beginning Jan. 1, 2013, and ending Dec. 31, 2017. In 27 of the 63 cases, defendants had obtained steroids or raw materials from the Far East to increase both volume and profit.Denham said that when the Internet became publicly accessible, underground sellers quickly capitalized on the technology to develop a new delivery system. This caused widespread counterfeiting and many sellers therefore began to purchase their own pill presses to manufacture steroids and other substances. Homebrewers currently use bodybuilding websites and chat rooms, as well as word of mouth, to sell their products.In one of the cases Denham examined, defendants sold steroids and other substances using the drug marketplaces Silk Road and Evolution Marketplace, ensuring anonymity in transactions through Bitcoin. The 2017 case involved 1,300 transactions and gross proceeds of $1.9 million, with substances including methamphetamine, hydrocodone, cocaine, marijuana and steroids.Denham also discussed Internet pharmacies, noting that on at least two occasions, the United States Government Accountability Office has investigated rogue pharmacies operating on the Internet. In 2014, the office estimated that 36,000 rogue pharmacies operated internationally, using sophisticated methods to ship FDA-unapproved drugs, controlled substances and counterfeit pharmaceuticals to the U.S.Related StoriesScientists develop universal FACS-based approach to heterogenous cell sorting, propelling organoid researchNew research links “broken heart syndrome” to cancerAXT enhances cellular research product portfolio with solutions from StemBioSys”When authorities succeed in shutting down one source of illicit drugs, others quickly emerge,” Denham said.Discussing geographic dispersion, Denham said the South Atlantic Division, one of nine divisions with district courts that heard steroid cases, accounted for approximately one in four cases. Defendants appeared in court at a time when law-enforcement agencies had cracked down on Florida “pill mills,” known for dispensing large amounts of prescription drugs in cash-only transactions.In fact, as part of his study, Denham came across the high-profile Biogenesis case in which an individual posing as a physician prescribed performance-enhancing drugs to high-school athletes and high-profile Major League Baseball players.Paradoxically, while law-enforcement agencies experienced some success in cracking down on pill mills, Denham said nearly one in five cases he studied involved former law-enforcement personnel as defendants. Denham said there is often an unstated assumption that those in management ranks will not ask questions, and if the problem is left unresolved, buyers of steroids can very quickly turn into future sellers.”The use of steroids in law enforcement does occur, which of course is a problem because obtaining steroids without a prescription from a licensed physician is illegal,” Denham said. “Additionally, someone who initially buys the drugs from that person may begin selling, and that may lead to selling other substances.”In the United States, anabolic steroids have been classified as Schedule III Controlled Substances since 1990. This means the substances have limited medicinal use and require a prescription from a licensed physician.Denham stressed the importance of keeping the findings of his study in appropriate perspective, as the cases he analyzed appeared in federal district courts across a five-year period. Cases are also prosecuted in courts at the state level, and most states have their own policies on illicit substances.last_img read more

first_imgBy Dr. Ananya Mandal, MDNov 21 2018MDMA or ecstasy pills can help individuals trust more and cooperate say a team of researchers who are looking at its properties that could help treat psychological disorders. The study was published this week in the latest issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.The team from King’s College London have found that MDMA can help raise the activity of several parts of the brain that are associated with social behaviour and empathy.This can thus help the user understand the intentions and beliefs of others and help them become more trusting and cooperative. At present MDMA is being tried in human volunteers for treatment of Post traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Researchers add that MDMA could help subjects undergo psychotherapy sessions more successfully when they are more receptive and cooperative.Professor Mitul Mehta from the King’s Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) in a statement said, “Understanding the brain activity underlying social behaviour could help identify what goes wrong in psychiatric conditions. Given the social nature of psychotherapy, understanding how MDMA affects social interaction sheds light on why the drug could become a valuable tool in treating patients.”The team however noted that while MDMA could help the participant become more trusting and cooperative, it did not make them gullible. For example, the 20 participants were given a series of games with trustworthy people and cheaters. Half of them were put on MDMA while the other half was given placebo. They were then given tasks and games.Those on MDMA were more cooperative but did identify people who were cheaters and did not naively trust them said Mehta. The participants also underwent MRI scans so that the researchers could understand the changes made by the drug on the brain.One of the tasks was that a pair of participants was given a situation called the “prisoner’s dilemma”. Here two accomplices are supposedly arrested and are being interviewed separately. They are being persuaded to turn on the other against a chance to be released. If they remain silent both would serve a short sentence and if they both turn on each other they would both serve a long sentence.Related StoriesRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaLight at last: why do more women develop Alzheimer’s disease?Research sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairThe team of researchers found that those on MDMA were less likely to turn on their partners compared to those who were on placebo. However if the MDMA participants knew their partners to be selfish and untrustworthy, they tended to turn on them similar to those on placebo.This meant that MDMA did not make them naive or gullible. However, if the partners proved themselves to be cooperative again, those on MDMA did not rat out on them and re-established their trust quickly.Simultaneously their brain activity showed that MDMA could light up the superior temporal cortex and mid-cingulate cortex regions of their brains. These areas are important to interpret other people’s intentions and beliefs.The main decision making area of the brain was the right anterior insula. This area was stimulated on MDMA so that participants could appraise the risks involved in a better manner.But when faced with untrustworthy partners, this region showed a decreased activity said experts. Dr Anthony Gabay, the first author of the study said, “Using MRI scans, we were also able to see that MDMA had an impact on brain activity when processing the behaviour of others, rather than altering the decision-making process itself.”“This research is important to build our understanding of how drugs might alter social cognition,” said Mehta. He added, “It has applications in testing novel drug therapies for mood and anxiety disorders. It also tells us which parts of the task a drug may alter, so we can target parts of behavior people are having difficulty with.” MDMA is a Schedule I drug which means that it has a high abuse potential and has no acceptable medicinal use.Source: http://www.jneurosci.org/content/early/2018/11/16/JNEUROSCI.1276-18.2018last_img read more

first_img Source:https://www.utsouthwestern.edu/newsroom/articles/year-2019/two-hit-model.html Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 12 2019Nearly half of current hospital admissions for heart failure are caused by a type of disease with no treatment options. Cardiology researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center are changing that reality with a fresh approach, recently published in Nature.”There are two types of heart failure. One is called HFrEF, for which we have a number of therapies, including medications, devices, and transplants. The other – HFpEF – has zero options,” explained UT Southwestern Chief of the Division of Cardiology and Professor of Internal Medicine and Molecular Biology Dr. Joseph Hill.”HFpEF is the single greatest unmet need in cardiology. Finding a new way to examine it represents a significant advance, as it provides a model necessary to develop and test therapies that could save lives worldwide,” said Dr. Hill, who holds the James T. Willerson, M.D. Distinguished Chair in Cardiovascular Diseases and the Frank M. Ryburn, Jr. Chair in Heart Research.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 5.7 million people have heart failure in the U.S.Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is a lethal disorder for which there are no effective clinical therapies. The heart muscle becomes too stiff to pump blood efficiently. Most HFpEF patients are obese, have diabetes, and have metabolic syndrome.Heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) functions differently. In HFrEF, also known as systolic HF, the heart muscle is not able to contract adequately and, therefore, expels less oxygen-rich blood into the body. Previous heart failure models of HFpEF focused on raising the levels of an enzyme called NO, or nitric oxide synthase.However, in HFpEF, there is actually too much of the NO enzyme. A strike on this target – with a medical inhibitor, for example – would solve the problem. According to Dr. Hill, there are already FDA-approved drugs that inhibit this NO-synthesize enzyme, which could facilitate developing new treatments rapidly.The two-hit modelRelated StoriesTeam approach to care increases likelihood of surviving refractory cardiogenic shockCancer incidence among children and young adults with congenital heart diseaseLiver fat biomarker levels linked with metabolic health benefits of exercise, study findsDr. Hill’s team looked at current, ineffective models of HFpEF and concluded that none of them correctly mirrors the realities they see clinically in human patients. They found that combining a high-fat diet with a drug that raises blood pressure gave them a “two-hit” model, like a one-two punch to the disease.Next, the team examined results of their model at the cellular level and compared them with human cells. They found that they had replicated the human condition, thereby providing scientists an accurate biological picture that can greatly advance the development of new treatments.”A recognized research gap in the HFpEF field is the lack of relevant experimental models that adequately represent the progression of this complex disorder. This study is an example of how advances in HFpEF models can lead to a better understanding of the disease pathophysiology and new ideas for therapeutic strategies,” said Dr. Bishow Adhikari, a program officer for the study and a scientist with the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, which helped fund the study.Millions of people worldwide have both obesity and diabetes. The research team believed that these two conditions would lead to HFpEF – a hypothesis they confirmed by duplicating the disease conditions and examining changes at the molecular level.”Heart failure is one of only two forms of cardiovascular disease that is increasing. It’s exploding around the world,” Dr. Hill said. “We dance around the edges of it, treating patients’ diabetes, blood pressure, and other conditions. With this model, we’ll be able to get to the underlying cause so we can get to the root of the problem.”The UT Southwestern researchers are currently taking steps toward moving into human clinical trials based on findings in their preclinical two-hit model. With time, they expect that all heart failure patients will have treatment options.last_img read more

first_img This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente. Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 24 2019In the 25 years since she snorted her first line of meth at a club in San Francisco, Kim has redefined “normal” so many times. At first, she said, it seemed like meth brought her back to her true self — the person she was before her parents divorced, and before her stepfather moved in.”I felt normal when I first did it, like, ‘Oh! There I am,'” she said.Kim is 47 now, and she has been chasing normal her entire adult life. That chase has brought her to some dark places, so she asked us not to use her last name. For a long time, meth, also known as speed, was Kim’s drug of choice.Then she added heroin to the mix. She tried it for the first time while she was in treatment for meth.”That put me on a nine-year run of using heroin. And I thought, ‘Oh, heroin’s great. I don’t do speed anymore.’ To me, it saved me from the tweaker-ness,” Kim said, referring to the agitation and paranoia many meth users experience, and how heroin, an opiate, calmed that.Now, Kim has finished treatment for both drugs.Kim was part of the previous meth wave, in the ’90s, and now she’s part of a new meth epidemic that has been sweeping through parts of the United States, especially the West. Deaths involving methamphetamine are up. Hospitalizations are up.Seeking A ‘Synergistic High’Researchers who have tracked drug use for decades believe the new meth crisis got a kick-start from the opioid epidemic.”There is absolutely an association,” said Dr. Phillip Coffin, director of substance use research at the San Francisco Department of Public Health.Across the country, more and more opioid users say they now use meth as well, up from 19% in 2011 to 34% in 2017, according to a study published last year in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence. The greatest increases were in the western United States.That research suggests efforts to get doctors to cut down on writing opioid prescriptions may have driven some users to buy meth on the street instead.”Methamphetamine served as an opioid substitute, provided a synergistic high, and balanced out the effects of opioids so one could function ‘normally,'” the researchers wrote.It’s kind of like having a cup of coffee in the morning to wake up, and a glass of wine in the evening to wind down: meth on Monday to get to work, heroin on Friday to ease into the weekend.Amelia said that’s how her drug use evolved to include meth — she also asked that we use only her first name because she has used illegal substances.At first, drugs were just a fun thing to do on weekends — ecstasy and cocaine with her friends. Then, on Monday, Amelia went about her workweek.”I’m a horse trainer, so I worked really hard, but I also partied really hard,” she said.Then one weekend, when Amelia was feeling kind of hung over from the night before, a friend passed her a pipe. She said it was opium.”I thought it was like smoking weed or hash, you know? I just thought it was like that,” Amelia said.She grew to like the opium stuff. Eventually, Amelia met up with her friend’s dealer.”The woman said, ‘How long have you been doing heroin for?’ and my jaw nearly hit the ground,” Amelia said. “I was just really, honestly shocked. I was like, ‘What? I’ve been doing heroin this whole time?’ I felt really naive, really stupid for not even putting the two together.”Pretty soon, Amelia started feeling sick around the same time every day. It was withdrawal symptoms, a clear sign she was becoming dependent on the drug. Her weekend smoke became her daily morning smoke. Then it was part of her lunch-break routine.”I just kind of surrendered to that and decided, ‘Screw it,'” she said. “‘I’ll just keep doing it. I’m obviously still working; I’m fine.'”Related StoriesCannabidiol reduces cue-induced craving and anxiety in individuals with history of heroin abuseOpioids are major cause of pregnancy-related deaths in UtahFlorida is the latest Republican-led state to adopt clean needle exchangesA heroin habit is expensive. Amelia was working six days a week to pay for it. Any horses that needed to be ridden, any lessons that needed to be taught, she said ‘yes,’ because she wanted the money.But bankrolling her heroin habit was exhausting. One day, one of the women she worked with at the horse barn offered her some meth as a pick-me-up.Meth is comparatively cheap. It became the thing that kept Amelia going so she could earn enough money to buy heroin.”The heroin was the most expensive part,” she said. “That was $200 a day at one point. And the meth was $150 a week.”This pattern lasted for three years, until Amelia discovered she was pregnant. As soon as her daughter was born, she entered a residential treatment program in San Francisco, called the Epiphany Center, that would accept her and her baby.”I was OK with being a drug addict. I was OK with that being my life,” she said. “But I wasn’t OK with having kids and letting that be part of my life.”Rehab Admissions On The Rise For Users Who Mix Meth, HeroinAdmissions to drug rehabilitation for heroin have remained steady in recent years in San Francisco. But the number of heroin addicts reporting methamphetamine as a secondary substance problem has been rising. In 2014, 14% of heroin users said meth was also a problem. Three years later, 22% said so.”That is very high,” said Dr. Dan Ciccarone, a physician and professor at the University of California-San Francisco who has been studying heroin for almost 20 years. “That’s alarming and new and intriguing and needs to be explored.”The speedball — heroin and cocaine — is a classic combination, he said.”It’s like peanut butter cups, right? Chocolate and peanut butter together,” he said. “Methamphetamine and heroin are an unusual combination.”The meth-and-heroin combo is referred to as a goofball, Ciccarone added, because it makes the user feel “a little bit silly and a little bit blissful.”For Kim, adding heroin to her methamphetamine habit compounded her use. “I ended up doing both, at the same time, every day, both of them,” she said.It was all about finding the recipe to what felt normal. Start with meth. Add some heroin. Touch up the speed.”You’re like a chemist with your own body,” she said. “You’re balancing, trying to figure out your own prescription to how to make you feel good.”Now Kim is trying to find balance without drugs. She’s been sober for a year. So has Amelia, the horse trainer. Her sobriety anniversary is her daughter’s birthday.This story is part of a partnership that includes KQED, NPR and Kaiser Health News.last_img read more

first_imgglobal expansion Ireland has started wooing Kerala-based companies to set up units there by using that country as a base to access European markets. Tanaz Buhariwalla, Country Director – India at IDA Ireland, who was here for a road-show, told presspersons that there has been increased interest from Indian companies to use Ireland as their base for growth in Europe. This interest has spiked since Brexit, as companies were concerned about how they would service the European markets from the UK. Over 40 Indian companies from the IT, services, medical devices, engineering and pharmaceuticals sectors have set up shop in Ireland. “We are excited at the response received from Kochi-based companies that we are in discussion with. We are looking at companies engaged in food processing, agri, IT, life sciences and healthcare workers,” she said. IDA Ireland, the nodal agency to attract investments, is engaging with organisations in IT services, fintech, pharmaceuticals and medical devices, among others. Currently, six of the top 10 Indian IT services companies operate out of Ireland, including TCS, HCL, Wipro, Infosys and Mindtree.Indian and Irish companies are increasingly looking for opportunities to collaborate in key knowledge sectors, and it is encouraging to note the increase in conversations between companies of the two countries. Indian companies are turning to Ireland to benefit from the well-developed sectoral clusters there, and to gain access to valuable European markets, she added. SHARE SHARE EMAIL Brexit Published on August 03, 2018 Kerala companies Tanaz Buhariwalla, Country Director – India at IDA Ireland Ireland COMMENT SHARE COMMENTSlast_img read more