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Alabamas Kay Ivey Recognized with ADCs State Leadership Award

first_img ADC AUTHOR Kay Ivey, Governor of Alabama, has been recognized as the recipient of the Association of Defense Community’s 2019 State Leadership Award.Ivey and other ADC Award honorees were recognized Monday during a lunch ceremony at the 2019 Defense Communities Annual Summit.Known as a champion for her state’s installations, defense communities and military service population, Gov. Ivey has championed wide-ranging legislation to improve the quality of life for service members and their families since 2017.In May 2018, Ivey signed several service-related quality of life bills, including the Military Family Jobs Opportunity Act, which provides professional licensure reciprocity for military spouses across numerous state agencies. She also signed the Parks for Patriots bill, which grants free state parks admission to active or retired Alabama service members.Ivey was also an integral part of the state’s campaign to secure the fifth-generation F-35 Fighter mission for the 187th Fighter Wing at Maxwell Air Force Base.“While many people were involved in the multi-year selection process for the F-35 Fighter Wing, the governor led our state through this journey with distinction, and she was instrumental in bringing this next-generation aircraft to Montgomery,” U.S. Rep. Martha Roby (R-Ala.) said. “I am incredibly proud of Gov. Ivey’s leadership and commitment to Alabama’s military footprint,” Roby added.Army photo by Sgt. William Fryelast_img read more

first_img NASA SpaceX 4 5:41 Comments Now playing: Watch this: Originally published March 2, 12.01 a.m. PT. Updates, March 2, 5:32 p.m. PT: Adds tweets, images from launch; March 3, 3 a.m. PT: Adds ISS docking information. Tags 7:07 SpaceX’s Crew Dragon launches to the ISS 16 Photos Elon Musk shows off the shiny SpaceX Starship Share your voice Sci-Tech The Crew Dragon trailing the ISS as it prepares for capture. NASA/SpaceX SpaceX has taken another small step toward sending astronauts into space after launching the Crew Dragon capsule early Saturday morning and successfully docking with the International Space Station. spacex-demo1 SpaceX Affixed to the top of a Falcon 9 booster, the rounded cone capsule of the Crew Dragon blasted off in a blaze of fire and smoke from Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 2:49 a.m. ET Saturday. The launch was the first step in the Demo-1 mission, designed to test the capabilities of the capsule over the next week, but it was only the beginning. After launch the capsule coasted to the ISS, making a number of maneuvers to line up with a specialized docking adapter aboard the station. Though live footage of the event appeared low-key, both the Crew Dragon and the ISS were traveling at over 17,500 miles per hour during the monumental docking attempt.  Crew Dragon achieved soft capture with the ISS at 5:51 a.m. ET, but the high-speed space grab wasn’t over. Shortly after, 12 hooks reached out from Crew Dragon to firmly attach it to the ISS, enabling a “hard capture” of the capsule at 6 a.m. ET and marking the first successful docking of a Commercial Crew capsule at the ISS. SpaceX’s Crew Dragon spacecraft docks with the International… Now playing: Watch this: No humans are on board, but the capsule isn’t empty. Locked within Crew Dragon is a flight dummy nicknamed Ripley and an anthropomorphic plushie of planet Earth designed to indicate when the capsule had reached zero gravity. In addition, the capsule carried around 400 pounds of crew supplies and equipment to the ISS to simulate future missions.  A view from onboard the Crew Dragon as it approached the ISS. SpaceX/NASA On Saturday morning, the historic launch was celebrated with cheers and applause at Kennedy Space Center, after multiple delays pushed the maiden flight back from an expected launch in 2018. The site of the landmark launch was Pad 39A, which has previously seen NASA’s Saturn rockets carry astronauts to the moon aboard Apollo spacecraft and the famous launches of NASA’s space shuttles. SpaceX CEO Elon Musk expressed his appreciation for both the SpaceX team and NASA at a post-launch press conference but noted the mental toll the experience had on him. “To be frank, I’m a little emotionally exhausted,” he sighed. “That was super stressful, but it worked… So far.”    Though the launch was a success, SpaceX still has a few more obstacles to overcome before the demonstration mission is complete. The capsule will remain docked at the ISS until March 8, then begin what is arguably the most important part of its demonstration: successfully returning to Earth. The capsule is fitted with enhanced parachutes and is set to splash down in the Atlantic Ocean. The Falcon 9 blasts off, carrying Crew Dragon for the first time. SpaceX Speaking of the Atlantic, the reusable Falcon 9 booster that launched Crew Dragon landed on the droneship Of Course I Still Love You drifting in the ocean, approximately 10 minutes after liftoff. As part of its Commercial Crew program, NASA handed contracts to both SpaceX and Boeing in 2014 to develop rockets that could send astronauts back to space. NASA hasn’t launched humans to space since 2011, when the Space Shuttle program ended. In the meantime, the agency has paid for spots on the Russian-built Soyuz spacecraft at a cost of over $80 million per seat. That makes Saturday’s success particularly important, helping chart a course for NASA to bring launches back to American soil and keep costs down.  “We want to make sure we keep our partnership with Russia, which has been very strong for a long period of time,” NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said before the flight. “But we also want to make sure we have our own capability to get back and forth to the International Space Station.” The Crew Dragon separates from the Falcon 9 in Earth’s shadow. SpaceX The Crew Dragon capsule is an enhanced version of SpaceX’s Dragon capsule, which has ferried cargo from Earth to the ISS on 16 previous occasions. This iteration can carry seven human passengers, which it’ll eventually shuttle to the ISS in low Earth orbit. Provided this demo mission proceeds as planned, the Crew Dragon will have to demonstrate its safety in one more “in-flight abort test,” scheduled for later this year. If it passes that test, SpaceX and NASA will finally be ready to make another giant leap, sending astronauts to the ISS from the US for the first time since 2011. last_img read more

Congress passes OPEN Government Data Act to make open data part of

first_img22nd December marked a win for U.S. government in terms of efficiency, accountability, and transparency of open data. Following the Senate vote held on 19th December, Congress passed the Foundations for Evidence-Based Policymaking (FEBP) Act (H.R. 4174, S. 2046). Title II of this package is the Open, Public, Electronic and Necessary (OPEN) Government Data Act, which requires all non-sensitive government data to be made available in open and machine-readable formats by default. The federal government possesses a huge amount of public data which should ideally be used to improve government services and promote private sector innovation. According to Data Coalition, “the open data proposal will mandate that federal agencies publish their information online, using machine-readable data formats”. What does the bill mandate? There are a number of practical things the bill will do, which should have real benefits for both citizens and federal organizations: Makes Federal data more accessible to the public, and requires all agencies to publish an inventory of all their “data assets” Encourages government organizations to use data to make decisions Ensuring better data governance by requiring Chief Data Officers in Federal agencies After some minor corrections made on Saturday, December 22nd, the Senate passed the resolution required to send the bill onwards to the president’s desk. There are two things which were amended in this act before passing it on to the president: The text was amended so that it only applied to CFO Act agencies, not the Federal Reserve or smaller agencies. There was acarve-out “for data that does not concern monetary policy,” which relates to the Federal Reserve, among others. Why is the open data proposal required? For many years, businesses, journalists, academics, civil society groups, and even other government agencies have relied on data that the federal government makes freely available in open formats online. However, while many federal government agencies publish open data, there has never been a law mandating the federal government to do so. The data available in a machine-readable format and catalogued online will help individuals, organizations, and other government offices to use it while preserving privacy and national security concerns. Open data has been an effective platform for innovation in the public sectors supporting significant economic value while increasing transparency, efficiency, and accountability in government operations. It has worked towards powering new tools and services to address some of the country’s most pressing economic and social challenges. Michele Jolin, CEO and co-founder of Results for America, said in a statement. “We commend Speaker Ryan, Senator Murray and their bipartisan colleagues in both chambers for advancing legislation that will help build evidence about the federally-funded practices, policies and programs that deliver the best outcomes. By ensuring that each federal agency has an evaluation officer, an evaluation policy and evidence-building plans, we can maximize the impact of public investments.” U.S Citizens also called this bill a big ‘milestone’ in the history of the country and accepted the news with vigor. You can read the entire backstory on what’s in the bill and how it was passed at E Pluribus Unum. Read Next Equifax data breach could have been “entirely preventable”, says House oversight and government reform committee staff report Consumer protection organizations submit a new data protection framework to the Senate Commerce Committee Furthering the Net Neutrality debate, GOP proposes the 21st Century Internet Actlast_img read more