Month: September 2020

first_imgStructures and natural mangrove/Desa Bedono (credits Wetlands International)Director of EcoShape Building with Nature, Henk Nieboer and Henk Ovink, Special Envoy for International Water Affairs of The Netherlands, have released the position paper about critical steps for upscaling Building with Nature.The two authors, invite the international water sector to join forces and scale up the Nature Based Solutions.Ovink and Nieboer argue in their paper that the following steps are critically important to achieve upscaling:Educate the new generation of engineers, designers, ecologists, policy makers, politicians and managers in the principles of Nature Based Solutions;Develop a credible narrative of Nature Based Solutions on landscape scale for various water related challenges, including business cases and examples of successful (pilot) projects;Implement large scale pilot projects worldwide and disseminate the experience and knowledge gained;Involve communities in the planning and implementation of nature based solutions and equip them with knowledge and financial means in order to scale up and sustain such solutions, working side by side with governments and private sector;Scale up existing pilots and replicate these in international consortia across the globe, in partnership with the financial sector (Multilateral Development Banks, the Green Climate Fund, governments, private sector and pension funds).EcoShape is a consortium of engineering firms, knowledge institutes, dredging companies, NGO’s and government agencies working together to develop, test and share knowledge about Building with Nature in pilot projects.Partners are Boskalis, Van Oord, Witteveen+Bos, Deltares, Wageningen University, Arcadis, Royal Haskoning DHV, HKV Lijn in Water, IHC, Vereniging van Waterbouwers, Wetlands International and Ministry of Infrastructure and Water Management.last_img read more

first_imgMarineEnergy.biz has compiled the top news from marine energy industry from June 25 until July 1, 2018.Swansea Bay tidal lagoon gets an official ‘no’The UK government has rejected the Swansea Bay tidal lagoon proposal, stating that it does not meet the requirements for value for money.The UK government’s decision not to support the Swansea Bay tidal lagoon project – proposed by Tidal Lagoon Power – was unveiled by the UK energy secretary Greg Clark during his address to the House of Commons on June 25, 2018.The decision comes 18 months after the release of the government-commissioned review of tidal lagoon industry, known as the Hendry Review, which backed the wider tidal lagoon industry, as well as the ‘pathfinder’ Swansea Bay tidal lagoon.PLAT-I bound for Nova Scotia after buoyant Scottish trialsUK marine engineering company Sustainable Marine Energy (SME) is preparing to ship the PLAT-I tidal energy platform from Connel in Western Scotland, to Grand Passage in Nova Scotia, where it will be put to the second round of sea trials.The 280kW PLAT-I platform, which was under trials at Connel Sound since November 2017, is expected to be Canada bound on a container ship by mid-July.SME is now teaming up with the Canadian company Black Rock Tidal Power Inc (BRTP) for the follow on project that will see the PLAT-I deployed for the second phase of testing in the harsher sea climate.MAKO tidal turbine set for Gladstone port demonstrationAustralian-based tidal energy company MAKO Tidal Turbines (MTT) and Gladstone Ports Corporation (GPC) have joined forces to conduct a six-month tidal turbine demonstration in Queensland.The project, set for deployment at Port of Gladstone, will investigate how tidal energy can contribute to Australia’s energy mix by producing clean, predictable renewable energy.MAKO said its tidal turbine is expected to be installed at GPC’s Barney Point Terminal within months.Sweden pumps in €8.2M for full-scale CorPower deviceThe Swedish Energy Agency has granted CorPower Ocean a little over €8 million (SEK 85 million) to support the construction and testing of a full-scale device and subsequent wave energy park demonstration.The demonstration wave energy park will feature three full-scale CorPower units, according to the Swedish Energy Agency.Earlier in the week, the European Marine Energy Centre (EMEC) issued a performance statement to CorPower Ocean following the dry testing of Swedish developer’s half-scale wave energy converter (WEC) in Stockholm.The testing involved the dry testing of CorPower’s power take-off (PTO) on the Hardware-In-the-Loop (HIL) test rig, specifically designed for the purposes of testing the PTO onshore as part of the Wave Energy Scotland (WES) funded Hi-Drive project.European ocean energy market study hot off the pressDG MARE, a body responsible for the EU Commission’s policies on maritime affairs and fisheries, has published an ocean energy market study which outlines the financial needs of the ocean energy sector in the EU.The scope of the study, co-authored by WavEC Offshore Renewables and Italian business management consultants COGEA, was to estimate the financial needs of the ocean energy sector in the EU, identify potential financing gaps and possible financing solutions, and to analyse recommendations of the ocean energy roadmap in that context.last_img read more

first_imgRoyal IHC said in its latest announcement that their General Dredging Course is set to take place on September 10-21, 2018, in Kinderdijk, the Netherlands.This intensive two-week program will feature several excursions, a guest lecture about the Port of Rotterdam and a one-day simulator experience on an IHC Beaver cutter suction dredger.The course is designed for both technical and non-technical management professionals in dredging-related industries.The following topics will be covered during the two-week training:Different dredging applications within a port;Dredge project phases;Dredging equipment types and boundaries for their use;Scoping site conditions;Fundamentals of hydrographic surveying;Dredge project management including costs and contracts;Fundamentals of hydraulic transportation and dredge pumps;Environmental aspects of dredging.The training is designed for professionals on management level in dredging related industries. It will be beneficial for people working for governments, port and harbor authorities, offshore companies, construction companies, dredging contractors and other organisations.last_img read more

first_imgShuttle tankers operator Knutsen NYK Offshore Tankers (KNOT) has been awarded a contract to build two LNG-fueled shuttle tankers for Italy’s oil and gas company Eni. Illustration: A KNOT tanker / Image by Darren Hillman – Shared under the CC BY-ND 2.0 licenseKNOW said last Friday that the two new 124,000 DWT LNG-fueled shuttle tankers would be built by Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering shipyard in South Korea with delivery in mid-2022. The vessels will operate in North Sea under time-charter contract for a maximum period of ten years.These vessels will be able to reduce emissions of CO2 equivalents significantly compared to conventional oil-fueled shuttle tankers, through using LNG as the primary fuel and further utilized the energy recovered from volatile organic compounds. There will also be installed a battery package to save energy during DP operation.President and CEO of KNOT, Trygve Seglem, said: “We are pleased to announce that KNOT and Eni extend their partnership in the North Sea with two new LNG shuttle tankers.“Eni, through their ownership in Vår Energi has many interests in North Sea gas and oil fields and is thus one of the major players in the area. This contract is the third and fourth long-term time-charter shuttle-tanker contracts between Eni and KNOT Group.”In a separate statement on Monday, Vår Energi confirmed it had secures access to two new LNG-powered shuttle tankers for crude oil shuttling in the North Sea and the Barents Sea.Vår Energi said the new vessels would represent considerable reduction in CO2 emissions. Each vessel will be able to reduce CO2 emissions by 40 percent compared to conventional oil-fuelled shuttle tankers.Vår Energi already uses a LNG-powered offshore supply vessel for the Goliat operations in the Barents Sea.Offshore Energy Today StaffSpotted a typo? Have something more to add to the story? Maybe a nice photo? Contact our editorial team via email. Also, if you’re interested in showcasing your company, product, or technology on Offshore Energy Today, please contact us via our advertising form where you can also see our media kit.last_img read more

first_imgTSHD Vox Amalia Busy in Den Helder15 months after the trailing suction hopper dredger (TSHD) Vox Amalia was christened by the Dutch Queen Maxima, the vessel started its first job. Maintaining TSHD Charlock at Niestern SanderVan den Herik’s trailing suction hopper dredger (TSHD) Charlock has been back at the Niestern Sander shipyard in Farmsum, the Netherlands. Converting General Cargo Vessel to Hopper DredgerLast year, Holland Shipyards Group was selected by Faasse Dredging for the conversion of a general cargo vessel to a hopper dredger. Image source: niesternsander.comDredging Today brings you an overview of the most popular stories from the past week (March 30-April 5, 2020).center_img Donjon Wraps Up Manhattan DredgingIn preparation for the arrival of the USNS Comfort to New York, USACE New York District Operations Division moved quickly and approved the necessary dredging permits that allowed Donjon Marine of Hillside, New Jersey, to expedite dredging operations at Manhattan Cruise Terminal, using a crew of 60 and working two 12-hour shifts each day. Dredging Plough – 20 Tons of Steel by StraatmanMachinefabriek L. Straatman BV is currently producing a dredging plough with a total length of 14 meters and a weight of 20 tons.last_img read more

first_imgThe vessel is expected to enter service by December 2023 and to be based out of the Hampton Roads region of Virginia with a U.S. crew. The company expects the vessel to be used on a pipeline exceeding 5 GW of offshore wind construction through 2027, enabling the investment needed for this first of its kind vessel. Dominion Energy announced in May it is leading a consortium to build the Jones Act compliant installation vessel which will service U.S. offshore wind projects. “A Jones Act compliant offshore wind installation vessel is vital for the continued growth of the U.S. offshore wind industry,” said Mark D. Mitchell, Dominion Energy’s vice president of generation construction. The crane will be able to lift 2,200 tons and will allow the installation of the new generation of offshore wind turbines. “Huisman is a global leader and brings years of experience to this venture and will further enable the offshore wind industry to bring clean, renewable energy to customers in the U.S.” Dominion Energy has selected Huisman to deliver the crane for what will be the first U.S. Jones Act compliant offshore wind installation vessel.last_img read more

first_imgPublic Discourse 13 Feb 2013Yesterday I explained the problems that arise from commercialized sperm donation—namely degraded men who are absent fathers to children disturbed by the circumstances of their birth. Today I explore more closely the role that money plays as men’s greatest motive for donating sperm, and its impact on future children. I conclude by proposing how we can challenge the sperm-sale industry.Money MattersMany people in the assisted reproductive technology world want adult-conceived donor children to hush their complaints and ignore their own suffering. But some new buyers are listening to them. Sperm banks now offer more financial compensation to donors who are willing to be identified when a child turns eighteen. According to Rene Almeling, one sperm facility now pays 55 percent more to donors willing to be identified ($100 per donation) than it pays to anonymous donors ($65 per donation). At three cups per week, four weeks per month, $100 per sample creates a monthly income of $1200.This money is the primary incentive for identification, not a sense of responsibility or a desire to know one’s children. To increase sales, men sometimes are prompted by facility staff members to beef up their stated motives for donating. One staff member explained to Almeling that if a profile is negative, the man may be further queried:“Do you really mean that money is the only thing for you?” And if it is, we are honest enough to just leave it that way. But a lot of times [donors] say, “Well, it’s not just the money, it’s also. . . .” [So the staff will say,] “Why don’t you rewrite this little portion to reflect that also?”The facilities do not invest money in these men without expecting a substantial profit from the sale of their sperm. So they have every reason to make donor profiles as appealing as possible. Altruism is an appealing motive to sperm buyers. Avarice is not.If men were not paid $50 to $100 per donation, how many would show up at the clinic each week? The commonsense answer is very few, if any. In contrast, millions of men go out of their way to donate blood every year for no fee. They are willing to undergo discomfort and inconvenience without reimbursement.Like sperm donors, blood donors don’t know where or how their blood will be used, but blood does not create children. The reality is that selling sperm is nearly always a selfish act done for money with no regard for the wellbeing of the children produced. When men sell their sperm knowing it will be used to create children but don’t know where, when, by whom, or under what circumstances their children will be born, it is hard to make a case for altruism.last_img read more

first_imgMercatorNet 10 March 2014With graduation around the corner for the class of 2014, many students are beginning to ponder what kind of job will pay off their mountain of debt. And well they should. TIME reported last week that the average amount of student debt for the class of 2012 was $29,400. Over the past ten years, the amount of student debt nationwide has grown from an already staggering $253 billion to a suffocating $1.08 trillion—a 300% increase.The problem, of course, is that debt keeps America’s young graduates from pursuing life as they otherwise might. In an economy driven by consumer spending, more cost-conscious young Americans spells troubled times ahead. And whereas student debt used to make it easier for college graduates to qualify for a mortgage, as it generally meant a higher-paying job, lenders now are increasingly wary of large amounts of debt.The TIME story cited many factors for the increase in debt, including the rising cost of higher education coupled with stagnant wage growth. But another, little-cited cause may run even deeper.The New Research – The best college-aid programThe rising cost of a college education, coupled with the federal government’s eagerness to expand levels of student loans allegedly to make higher education more affordable, means that the average senior graduates with not only a degree but also a huge amount of debt. These numbers get a lot of press, but almost no attention has been directed to a major cause of student debt: having divorced or remarried parents.According to a study by sociologists at Rice University, collegians whose parents are not married to each other face significantly heavier financial burdens for the simple reason that married parents, relative to other parents, contribute significantly more to their children’s college education.  Looking at data from the National Postsecondary Student Aid Survey, Ruth N. López Turley and Matthew Demond compared the financial contribution of parents by marital status to their children’s education using a sample of 2,400 undergraduates during the 1995–96 academic year. These older data were mined because they were the most recent data that included parental interviews reporting their financial contributions toward their children’s education. In every measure—and in descriptive analyses as well as in multivariate regressions that controlled for factors that might explain the parental marital-status difference—the researchers found that marital status was the most significant and consistent determinant of the amount of money parents contribute toward their children’s college expenses.http://www.mercatornet.com/family_edge/view/13698last_img read more

first_imgScienceDaily 2 July 2020Family First Comment: “Mothers who said they had used cannabis while pregnant were significantly more likely to report their children having clinical sleep problems. Those who used marijuana frequently were more likely to report somnolence symptoms (symptoms of excess sleepiness) in their children, such as trouble waking in the morning and being excessively tired during the day.”Use marijuana while pregnant, and your child is more likely to suffer sleep problems as much as a decade later, according to a new University of Colorado Boulder study of nearly 12,000 youth.Published in Sleep Health: The Journal of The National Sleep Foundation, the paper is the latest to link prenatal cannabis use to developmental problems in children and the first to suggest it may impact sleep cycles long-term.It comes at a time when — while the number of pregnant women drinking alcohol and smoking cigarettes has declined in the United States — It has risen to 7% of all pregnant women as legalization spreads and more dispensaries recommend it for morning sickness.“As a society, it took us a while to understand that smoking and drinking alcohol are not advisable during pregnancy, but it is now seen as common sense,” said senior author John Hewitt, director of the Institute for Behavioral Genetics at CU Boulder. “Studies like this suggest that it is prudent to extend that common sense advice to cannabis, even if use is now legal.”A landmark studyFor the study, Hewitt and lead author Evan Winiger analyzed baseline data from the landmark Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development (ABCD) study, which is following 11,875 youth from age 9 or 10 into early adulthood.As part of an exhaustive questionnaire upon intake, participants’ mothers were asked if they had ever used marijuana while pregnant and how frequently. (The study did not assess whether they used edibles or smoked pot). The mothers were also asked to fill out a survey regarding their child’s sleep patterns, assessing 26 different items ranging from how easily they fell asleep and how long they slept to whether they snored or woke up frequently in the night and how sleepy they were during the day.About 700 moms reported using marijuana while pregnant. Of those, 184 used it daily and 262 used twice or more daily.After controlling for a host of other factors, including the mother’s education, parent marital status and family income and race, a clear pattern emerged.“Mothers who said they had used cannabis while pregnant were significantly more likely to report their children having clinical sleep problems,” said Winiger, a graduate student in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience.Those who used marijuana frequently were more likely to report somnolence symptoms (symptoms of excess sleepiness) in their children, such as trouble waking in the morning and being excessively tired during the day.READ MORE: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/07/200702153700.htmlast_img read more