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first_imgA drop in childhood vaccinations in the North-West has led to an increase in the risk of measles and meningitis outbreaks rises.The HSE has warned that the uptake of routine childhood vaccinations has dropped at the start of 2019 with only 85% of two-year-olds in Donegal receiving the MMR vaccine.The uptake of 2 doses of the meningitis C vaccine was 76% for Donegal and 85% for Sligo/Leitrim. Full protection with 3 doses of the pneumococcal vaccine (PCV) was also low at 75% for Donegal and 85% for Sligo/Leitrim.The pneumococcal vaccine protects against a number of serious diseases such as pneumonia, meningitis and septicaemia.Although the majority of people in Donegal, Sligo and Leitrim are still protecting their children with vaccination, 95% of people need to have the MMR vaccine to prevent the spread of measles.The current vaccination levels in the North West will not stop outbreaks of disease, warned the HSE. So far in 2019, there have been have had 12 cases of measles, 7 cases of whooping cough and 169 cases of mumps in the North West.Dr Laura Heavey, Specialist Registrar in Public Health Medicine in HSE North West said it is vital that parents take children to be vaccinated.She said “Every parent wants to protect their child and do what’s right for them. Sometimes it can be difficult to know what to do, now that there is so much false and misleading information on the internet and social media when it comes to vaccination.‘I would really encourage parents to look for information in the right places. Two good sources of reliable, evidence-based information are www.immunisation.ie and the Vaccine Knowledge Project at http://vk.ovg.ox.ac.uk/.“All of the vaccines on the infant, child and adolescent schedule in Ireland are backed up with years of data on their safety.’ A HSE spokesperson said that when vaccination rates fall, they immediately see in an increase in cases of diseases like measles, whooping cough, pneumonia and meningitis.The spokesperson warned “These diseases can result in serious illness and even death. Even those who survive can have long term impacts on their health.“Infection with the measles virus wipes out the special white blood cells, called T lymphocytes, that play a vital role in immunity to disease.“This means that children who get infected with measles will go on to get more illnesses for up to 3 years after their measles infection resolves, as their immune system struggles to recover from the virus.” Dr Heavey added that getting a disease ‘naturally’ is actually more risky for a child’s immune system.‘A vaccine contains bacteria or viruses that are weakened or killed. Vaccines don’t activate the immune system in the same way that getting infected with a live bacteria or virus would.“It’s much, much safer to get the MMR vaccine, for example, than risk your child getting sick with the live measles virus. A live virus or bacteria is much more stressful and difficult for the immune system to deal with’.The HSE spokesperson added “Vaccines save up to 3 million lives every year. New developments mean that vaccines could eliminate certain cancers caused by the HPV virus too. Rising vaccine hesitancy is a serious threat to this progress. False information about vaccines on the internet is one of the causes.“It’s never too late to catch up on your child’s vaccinations. If you are behind the schedule, contact your GP to discuss catching up.”Concerns as drop in vaccinations in North-West leads to risk of outbreaks was last modified: September 23rd, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

first_imgSAN FRANCISCO–As their second straight losing season comes to a close, the Giants don’t have any plans to perform an autopsy.The ownership group has already mourned the end of the franchise’s golden era. The Giants plan to embrace the next generation, and in doing so, they’ll leave behind general manager Bobby Evans, a key pillar of their glory days.Giants CEO Larry Baer announced Evans was dismissed from his role Monday as part of a wide-reaching organizational shakeup expected to continue …last_img read more

first_imgIt has been an eventful year for veteran Bay Area sportscaster Greg Papa.In January, he became the new radio play-by-play announcer for the San Francisco 49ers — a role he never envisioned while holding the same job for the Raiders from 1997 through the 2017 season.Then, last month, he gave up his noon-time sports talk show on KMGZ (95.7 FM — The game) and jumped to KNBR (680-AM), the 49ers flagship station. Beginning Tuesday, July 16, Papa will reunite with his previous KMGZ on-air partner, …last_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The May 2015 Miami East-MVCTC FFA Members of the Month are Casey Copeland, Madeline Davis, Olivia Edgell, and Riann Kingrey. They are all retired chapter officers and will soon be graduates of Miami East High School.Casey is the daughter of Rick and Stephanie Copeland of Casstown. She participated in Food Science and Horse Judging Career Development Events. She plans on attending The Ohio State University to major in molecular genetics.Madeline Davis is the daughter of Jerry and Noelle Davis of Troy. She was a Start State in Agribusiness Finalist and National Proficiency Finalist. She plans on attending Randolph College to major in business and equine science where she will be a member of the equestrian team.Olivia Edgell is daughter of Brian and Jamie Edgell of Fletcher. She served as chapter President and attended the Washington Leadership Conference. She plans to attend Walsh University where she will play college softball and major in early childhood education.Riann Kingrey is the daughter of Brad and Tanya Kingrey of Fletcher. She earned her State FFA Degree and coordinated the chapter’s trap-shooting events. She will attend Wright State University and major in computer science.Every month of the school year the Miami East-MVCTC FFA will select a student to be the FFA Member of the Month.  The officer team will nominate one student that has been actively involved in the FFA chapter, school and community activities.  If selected, the member will be recognized at the monthly FFA meeting, have their picture displayed in the Miami East Agricultural Education Room, and will receive a special medallion on celebration of their accomplishment.last_img read more

first_imgJason Liles explains how he successfully played George the Gorilla in ‘Rampage’ Updated: 11:51 AM 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Preparing for a role in a play or film can be very tedious because the actor must focus on the most minute details of the character that they’re trying to portray.But preparation for Jason Liles’ role as George the Gorilla in ‘Rampage’ was just as rigorous as any other role.Jason Liles was here to tell us how he successfully played the role and received praise from other actors in the industry.“Rampage is massive, ‘Rampage’ is fun, but the one thing that ‘Rampage’ is about more than anything is the relationship I have with my best friend, ‘George,’ played absolutely brilliantly and to perfection by Jason Liles.” — Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson on Jimmy Kimmel Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Lauren Phinney, KUSI Newsroom center_img July 19, 2018 Lauren Phinney, KUSI Newsroom, Posted: July 19, 2018last_img read more

first_img Updated: 10:36 PM Ashlie Rodriguez, Posted: October 29, 2018 Thousands honor Pittsburgh synagogue victims at community vigil October 29, 2018 Categories: Local San Diego News, National & International News FacebookTwitter 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsLA JOLLA (KUSI) – Thousands poured into congregation Beth Israel tonight to pay tribute to the eleven victims of the Pittsburgh synagogue shooting.Their presence, a massive show of solidarity against hate here in San Diego.KUSI’s Ashlie Rodriguez was live Monday evening at UTC with more. RELATED: Synagogue massacre defendant appears in court in wheelchair Ashlie Rodriguez last_img read more

first_imgJP: A genuine editorial justification is that I’m interested in exploring new and different ways to tell stories, and different and innovative ways to do design. We want to offer a more interactive user experience. It’s not just a corporate [mandate]. I’m absolutely sincere that the principle justification for digital-first for Technology Review is a thinking, a mode of being, that promotes innovation and excellence. This will allow us to write smarter and more link-y journalism; to design more beautiful and interactive experiences.Though it is certainly true that print is healthy and not going away, it is by no means a growing business. It is becoming more and more expensive to acquire print readers. At the same time that’s happening, print advertising has been in free fall for the last 15 years. When I was the editor of Red Herring, in the first six months of 2000, we had more than $100 million in print advertising. We did two editions a month with 400 to 500 pages, and 40 percent of these pages was advertising. It is a great month at Technology Review when we have 30 pages of print advertising. When print audiences are not growing and it is becoming increasingly expensive to acquire new readers; when there is declining and stagnant print advertising; we’ve seen our online audiences increase 75 percent year-over-year.For me as a businessman, as I’m the publisher as well as the editor-in-chief, I must follow where the audiences and advertisers are going, and for us, they’re going to electronic media. We feel that some of the unhappiness of traditional publishers is richly deserved. They haven’t provided good service to their marketing partners and their media partners’ ad agencies. FOLIO: How are you defining “good service?” JP: National Journal; Ars Technica has an interesting membership service for Ars Technica Prime; the membership model at GigaOm. We looked outside traditional media business to the new media properties like Amazon, Google and even Facebook to begin to explore what membership and community might look like. We were transparently sincere when we said, ‘we don’t know, tell us what you want.’ We’ll add up all the stuff and try to price it at the level the market can bear. We want to be less like a traditional media company as we think about the membership model, and more like a software or Web company, maybe even like Apple.FOLIO: Describe the models you’ve worked through before getting to this digital-first plan. JP: We have very deliberately worked through a series of experimental models. We tried having an ‘all or nothing’ paywall. As many people discovered, it was the least effective of all possible options. We experimented with a porous paywall, which didn’t work for us because we don’t publish as much as NYT, WSJ or FT. They work well when you’re publishing so much. You have enough readers who are reading this waterfall of editorial that you create sufficient friction. We don’t publish that much, only three to seven stories a day. It’s not enough to create that needed friction. Then we’ve experimented with what has become a default, a paid print magazine and an entirely free site. While it works best, we don’t think that’s the long-term home of Tech Review. We suspect it will be some combination of a free website; one that’s readable on tablets as well as desktop and laptop computers, a print magazine for both national and international for as long as people want it and a membership model that does some innovative things.FOLIO: What is your revenue model now?JP: We are a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit, fully owned corporation of MIT, which doesn’t mean we’re not in business. We are a commercial enterprise. MIT gives me zero venture capital. Everything I want to do has to be funded by cashflow. MIT provides some revenue for an alumni magazine, that is appreciated, but it by no means pays our bills. They also subsidize us in a variety of other ways—our research material is free, we have access to MIT libraries. We receive about a third of our revenue from subscribers/consumers, which includes the newsstand. We receive a third from advertising—two-thirds of that is digital. Within that final third is a mixture of the MIT contribution and what is now our largest and fastest growing line of business, which is a foreign licensing line of business; and things like list rental. JP: You know that old joke which publishers like to chortle about, when marketers say, “I know I’m wasting half my ad dollars, I just don’t know which half?” That must be really infuriating if you’re in the advertising business. Online, we know exactly which advertising dollars are effective, and a strong impulse for going digital first is to provide more unique and more interactive opportunities for our strongest advertising partners and their agencies. There are some intriguing opportunities to which we don’t have all the answers for yet, about constructing a truly digital homologue to the old subscription business around membership and community. FOLIO: What models out there are appealing to you? Technology Review editor-in-chief Jason Pontin recently provided a one-two punch of blog posts detailing a pair of significant digital pivots for the brand. Both have caused a stir among the media crowd for their frank assessment of TR‘s progress in the digital space. The first announced the brand’s plan to ditch the app model after being “deluded” by its initial appeal. The second laid the groundwork for an exploration of a membership model after a series of paid and hybrid digital strategies failed to pan out. Here, Pontin explains what he and the team behind Technology Review have planned next.FOLIO: It’s obvious that the print isn’t going away for Technology Review. You’ve made it clear that it remains important to you.Jason Pontin [JP]: I love print, and we have a very robust international publishing business where print is by and large healthier than in the United States. We have editions in Germany, in China, in India, in Italy—we hope to expand soon to the Middle East, perhaps Russia. To serve our domestic audience and to surprise and delight our international readers, print will always be part of what we do, so long as I’m editor-in-chief and publisher.FOLIO: So then what is driving the digital-first decision? FOLIO: How do you see these portions shifting as you go digital-first?JP: I suspect we’ll remain a three-legged stool, though I’d like to see the width of the legs increase. I’d like to do more foreign publisher business. As our audiences grow, particularly online, I think we’ll see digital advertising swell. I don’t anticipate we’ll significantly increase print circulation, the membership model in some form will swell our consumer revenue.last_img read more

first_img ADC AUTHOR Navy Capt. Dianna Wolfson has made history by being the first woman elevated to command Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility in Bremerton, Wash., KOMO News reported. Vice Adm. Thomas Moore installed Wolfson said she “was chosen for the position for one reason and one reason only — she was absolutely the very person for the job.”…Layton City, Utah, is seeking qualified firms to prepare a comprehensive Compatible Use Plan (CUP) for Hill Air Force Base in northern Utah. Layton City is also requesting in conjunction with its RFP, consideration of a CUP planning grant from the Office of Economic Adjustment. Interested parties wishing to bid must be submit a complete response to Layton City by 5 p.m., July 12.  View the complete scope and RFP here…Contamination from PFOA/PFOS toxins have been found polluting groundwater underneath an Arizona Air National Guard base adjoining Tucson International Airport, Tuscon.com reported. A consultant’s report for the Air Guard says testing turned up levels exceeding recommended federal standards in water underneath the base but because the base’s wells are already shut down and nearby city water is being routed to a treatment plant, the contamination doesn’t pose any immediate health risk, Tucson Water officials say.last_img read more

first_img.The students of Viqarunnisa Noon School and College who had been demonstrating following the suicide of a fellow on Thursday suspended their protest programme as their demands have been met, said their representative.They will participate in the exam scheduled to be held on Friday (tomorrow), said Anushka Roy on behalf of the students.A meeting between teachers and students was held on the school compound from 3:00am to 4:30am on Thursday, said the student.After the meeting, the students came out from the compound and informed reporters that they suspended their programme.Earlier, the students sent a letter to the ministry of education containing their demands.Their demands included resignation and punishment of the principal, end the threat of expulsion and illegal detention policy, appointment of counsellors to ensure the mental health of students, parents, teachers and other staff.Anushka Roy said their four demands have been met while two others are under the jurisdiction of the ministry.Meanwhile, another faction of student demanded the release of Viqarunnisa Noon School and College class IX class teacher Hasna Hena, who has been sent to jail in a case filed in connection with Aritree’s suicide.They claimed that their teacher Hasna Hena is innocent.“We demand punishment of the culprit but the release of Hasna Hena,” the students chanted slogans in front of the gate No 1.Nishat Sumaiya, a student of the school, said, “Our teacher Hasna Hena is completely innocent. We want her release.”last_img read more

first_img More information: www.kickstarter.com/projects/b … hnology-for-everyonebublcam.com/ © 2013 Phys.org (Phys.org) —Canada-based startup called Bubl Technology, founded in 2011, wants you to imagine being able to capture life in its bublcam, making, as it says, 360 degrees of your world available any time. The company has come up with prototypes of a little baseball-like gadget that is really four cameras arranged in a tetrahedral design, allowing a user to take photos and video. Sean Ramsey, founder and CEO, said the idea for the product was seeded some years ago, while he was working with a company in turn working with Google on a Street View project. Why not create a camera, he thought, to be capable of spherical footage for uses other than mapping? Why not use it for other things, such as panoramic photos? Explore further At the time of this writing, they have garnered $83,391 out of their $100,000 goal with 38 days to go. The target shipping date for the device, priced at over $400, is May next year. Citation: Little bublcam places life in spherical perspective (2013, November 5) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-11-bublcam-life-spherical-perspective.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. He and other team members started thinking in terms of technology that could support a device that was small, portable,and affordable. For the last two years, the company’s focus has been on the end goal of a market ready spherical camera that captures 100 percent of the spherical range through panoramic photos and videos. The company’s hardware CTO, Dan Mills, explained: “We designed the camera in a tetrahedral [patent pending] orientation…there are no blind spots because each camera overlaps the adjoining camera.” The camera’s form factor is distinctive, as a baseball size device that is light and easy to carry around. Applications potentially, are many, including the use of the bublcam in-real estate, gaming and sports, as well as security and surveillance. The bublcam is capable of recording video at 30fps at 720p or 15fps at 1080p and exports MP4 format.For the casing, the team is using four solid aluminum die-cast structural rings. According to the company, however, the “true innovation of the bublcam is its software that allows a single, 4 quadrant multiplexed image to be stitched into a sphere. We utilize a heat mapped blending process in order to blend the final photos and videos. These are what we like to call digital bubls.”The team continues to work on the device to bring it to market and, at this stage, has fully functional working prototypes. The company has turned to Kickstarter to bring the device to market. “We have been working on bubl for the past two years and we’ve come a long way. But now we need your help,” said the campaign message. “Your support will allow us to initiate tooling, manufacturing and software development so we can make bublcam and our software available to you and the millions of people who have never before had a 360º camera option.” Ricoh shows off omnidirectional camera (w/ video)last_img read more