Tag: 上海千花 女生自荐

first_imgMay 14, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Indonesia’s health ministry reported today that a 26-year-old pregnant woman who died 2 days ago tested positive for H5N1 avian flu, making her the country’s second fatality in as many weeks.The woman, who was 4 months pregnant, died at a hospital in Medan in North Sumatra, a health ministry official identified as Joko told Agence France Presse (AFP).Her death brings Indonesia’s fatality count to 76, Joko told AFP. From Indonesia’s recent reports, the total number of H5N1 cases appears to be 96, including the 26-year-old woman and a 29-year-old woman who died May 3, also at a hospital in Medan.The World Health Organization (WHO) has not included any Indonesian cases in its H5N1 count since the country stopped sharing H5N1 virus samples with the agency at the end of 2006. The WHO lists 81 cases with 63 deaths for Indonesia, out of a global total of 291 cases with 172 deaths; Indonesia leads the world in the number of deaths.The health ministry confirmed the woman’s case after a second set of tests came back positive for the H5N1 virus, AFP reported.The patient, who was thought to have eaten chickens that died of avian flu, became ill on May 2 and was treated at home before she was transferred to two different hospitals, the AFP report said.Twenty other patients are undergoing treatment for suspected H5N1 infections at various hospitals in Indonesia, Joko told AFP.In other avian flu news, animal-health officials in Bangladesh yesterday reported more H5N1 outbreaks in poultry, this time in a village near Nilphamari, about 250 miles northwest of Dhaka, the capital, Reuters reported today. The fresh outbreaks at small farms prompted villagers to cull about 15,000 chickens over the last few days, the report said.M. M. Kahn, a technical adviser to the Bangladesh Poultry Association, told AFP 2 days ago that the avian flu situation in poultry was “very grave” because some farmers were not reporting outbreaks or were trying to cover them up.”The flu is no longer confined to farms. Recently it infected domestic birds and fowls and there’s a real danger it could infect humans” in the heavily populated country, Khan told AFP.Government spokesman Abdul Motalib said the situation was not yet grave, but he acknowledged the nation was having trouble combating the outbreaks because of limited resources and staffing, the AFP report said.Bangladesh reported its first H5N1 outbreak in poultry in late March. Since then, Motalib said, H5N1 has hit 40 farms in 11 districts and has led to the culling of 151,000 birds, AFP reported.Meanwhile, officials across the border in India said today that dead poultry and ducks in two Indian states have tested negative for avian flu, Reuters reported. One of the farms that reported poultry deaths was in the eastern state of West Bengal in the village of Matigara, which borders Bangladesh.Upma Chawdhry, an official with India’s animal husbandry department, told Reuters that countrywide monitoring was continuing, with a focus on areas bordering countries that have reported poultry outbreaks.In Vietnam, a veterinary official from Nghe An, the central province where H5N1 virus resurfaced in poultry in early May, reported a new flu outbreak yesterday, the Chinese news agency Xinhua reported. About 1,900 ducks from three households were found dead on May 9, an animal-health official who requested anonymity told Xinhua. Samples from the dead birds tested positive for an H5 virus, the source said.Vietnam experienced a rash of outbreaks in December and January in several Mekong Delta and central provinces, according to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE).Vietnam has had 93 human H5N1 cases and 42 deaths, but no human cases have been reported since November 2005, according to the World Health Organization.See also:OIE reports on 2007 Vietnamese poultry outbreakslast_img read more

first_imgThis Sept. 30, 2013, file photo shows Miami Heat basketball player player LeBron James posed during the team’s media day in Miami. Four years after their messy breakup, the Cavaliers and James are at least talking about a reunion. Cavs officials met with James’ agent, Rich Paul, this week about the free-agent superstar’s possible return. The sides visited as James continued his family vacation, a person with knowledge of the details told The Associated Press on Thursday night, July 3, 2014. (AP Photo/J Pat Carter, File)MIAMI (AP) — Before LeBron James makes his next decision, Pat Riley will get a chance to convince him to stay in Miami.Two people familiar with the situation told The Associated Press late Sunday night that James will meet with the Heat president this week before making a decision about where to play next season. The time and location of the meeting were still being scheduled, said the people who spoke on condition of anonymity because neither the Heat nor James announced their plans publicly.“In the next two or three days,” one of the people said.Monday would seem difficult, unless James’ schedule changes. He has a commercial shoot planned and was expected to travel to Las Vegas later in the day for his annual camp with some of the nation’s best young basketball players, an event that opens Wednesday. James also has been planning a trip to Brazil for the World Cup final on July 13.There’s urgency from the Heat perspective as well. NBA players can begin signing new contracts Thursday, with some deals already having been agreed upon and plenty of others likely to fall into place in the coming days, so it would clearly benefit the Heat to know James’ plans sooner than later.USA Today Sports first reported the plans for James and Riley to discuss matters.The news of the planned Riley-James meeting came toward the end of a wild Sunday, sparked by news that one of Cleveland Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert’s private jets was heading to South Florida. And the plane did land at an airport in Fort Lauderdale around 6:40 p.m., albeit at a different facility than the flight plan indicated, for reasons that were not made clear.The plane stayed for about 3½ hours. It was unknown who was on the plane.Still, the mere notion of a James-Cavaliers reunion seems to have Cleveland — the team the Akron, Ohio, native spent his first seven seasons with before leaving for Miami — on anxious edge.James opted out of his contract with the Heat last month, as did fellow Miami stars Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh. James’ agent, Rich Paul, met with the Cavaliers, Phoenix Suns, Houston Rockets and Dallas Mavericks while the four-time NBA MVP was vacationing last week.James’ decision would figure to set off a wave of other deals. If he stays in Miami, that would almost certainly help convince Wade and Bosh to stay with the Heat. If James returns to Cleveland, the Cavaliers would more than likely have to make a trade of some significance to open up salary cap space.Riley and the Heat won over James with their sales pitch four years ago — and Miami has been to the NBA Finals all four years that it has had James in uniform, winning two championships. When James made the highly expected move to opt out and become a free agent this summer, Riley said through the team that he looked forward to having an opportunity to meet with him and discuss their futures together.Now, it would seem they’ll be discussing if they’ll actually have a future.The Cavs are hoping they can impress James with a young roster that includes No. 1 overall draft picks in Kyrie Irving, Anthony Bennett and Andrew Wiggins. In the early hours of free agency last week, Irving agreed to a five-year, $90 million contract extension the All-Star point guard is expected to sign Thursday.Cleveland also has room under the salary cap, but will need to clear more space to offer James a max deal.One stumbling block for the Cavs could be the fractured relationship between Gilbert and James. When James left in 2010, Gilbert wrote a scathing letter to Cleveland fans, condemning the four-time league MVP. He also told the AP he felt James quit in playoff games.While James has been out of the country with his wife, Savannah, and their two sons, Paul has been working on the four-time MVP’s future. Unlike four years ago, when teams flocked to Cleveland to make presentations to woo James, the courtship of him this time has been low key and rather business-like.The Cavs have waited patiently for their chance to try and convince the Akron, Ohio, native to come home. In the past few weeks, the Cavs have hired new coach David Blatt, selected Kansas swingman Andrew Wiggins with the No. 1 overall pick and gotten All-Star point guard Kyrie Irving to agree to a five-year, $90 million contract extension.Now, they’re working on bringing back James, who has never ruled out the possibility of a return.Two years ago, James was asked if he could ever see himself playing for the Cavs again.“I don’t know. I think it would be great,” he said. “It would be fun to play in front of these fans again. I had a lot fun times in my seven years here. You can’t predict the future and hopefully I continue to stay healthy. I’m here as a Miami Heat player, and I’m happy where I am now, but I don’t rule that out in no sense.“And if I decide to come back, hopefully the fans will accept me.”Cleveland fans, most of them anyway, have gotten over James’ infamous “Decision,” when he announced he was leaving on a nationally televised special. He was booed mercilessly in his first games back with the Heat, but in recent years he has been received more favorably. Maybe that’s because the Cavs haven’t been to the playoffs since he left and Clevelanders know he might be the only chance they have to see a championship in their lifetimes.Cleveland hasn’t won a title in any of the major sports since 1964.If he were to come back, James could repair the damage he did to his image when he left.But that remains a big ‘if.’In order for James to play again in Cleveland, he and Gilbert would have to have some sort of reconciliation. Gilbert’s letter — famously typed in comic sans font — was a blistering attack on James, who had carried the Cavs to the NBA Finals in 2007 but failed to deliver on his promise of a championship. Gilbert had guaranteed the Cavs would win a title before James, but later regretted the prediction.“Looking back now, that probably was not the most brilliant thing I’ve ever done in my life,” Gilbert said.He and James may get a second chance together.___AP Sports Writer Tom Withers in Cleveland contributed to this report.last_img read more

first_imgBy Chris Rotolo |SHREWSBURY – Can we do more to impact the community in a positive way?This is the question David Levy posed when he accepted the role of president at the Guild of Creative Arts (GCA), as he considered how the 58-year-old nonprofit artist cooperative at 620 Broad St. could influence and extend its reach.For Levy, the GCA was more than a celebrated showroom or heralded hub of creativity for local artists developing ideas.The facility presented Levy a platform, and what’s more, an opportunity, to make the artistic experience accessible to all who sought it, a notion that led him to establish The Docent Program.“Our mission at the Guild is to advance excellence in the visual arts, but our vision is to reach out to everyone in our community, especially the underserved populace, including those with disabilities, and ignite or rekindle their love of art,” Levy said on Tuesday, while prepping the GCA’s Feb. 11 reception for its current Exhibiting and Associate Show, an exhibition that runs until Feb. 27 and features the work of the cooperative’s most prominent artists.According to Levy, The Docent Program, which focuses on the observation of art pieces and emphasizes analysis, evaluation and higher-order thinking skills, caters to the developmental and cognitive needs of elementary school-aged students, as well as children and adults with special needs and senior citizens with cognitive or physical disabilities.Since founding The Docent Program in 2013, Levy has witnessed firsthand the benefits such an offering can provide to the surrounding special needs community, which is why he finds it troubling that funding for the arts has come under fire in recent years.“Art is for everyone and is something that enriches lives,” said Levy, a former college professor of art history, as well as an instructor of gifted and talented students and an enrichment teacher for students with special needs.“There are so many reasons why it’s worthwhile, and for kids especially, it shows that art activities stimulate various parts of their developing brain, which positively impacts other subject areas and aspects of their lives,” said Levy. “The arts are something worth fighting for.”While he remains steadfast in his fight for the preservation of arts education, Levy’s Docent Program continues to offer insight to those who wish to appreciate and interpret art pieces from the perspective of an artist, helping viewers gain a greater understanding of the creatives’ methods and what they hope to accomplish stylistically and affectively.“It was a goal of mine to help transform this into something more than a place to view art and take classes,” Levy said. “We wanted The Guild to be a community resource that could reach out and educate everyone. And this program is helping us do that.”This article was first published in the Feb. 8-15, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more