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first_img“And with such a people you can then do what you please.”That frightening change is happening in America, and at a shocking pace.But there are encouraging signs, too.One is that the reality-based press (the phrase I prefer to mainstream media) has been forced to be ever more transparent in how it operates.No more can we hide behind a paternalistic idea that “we know best” or “it’s news when we say it’s news.”Far greater journalistic transparency is required now. And we’re seeing more of it. When BuzzFeed made it clear, as it broke the news about U.S. Rep. John Conyers Jr.’s sexual-harassment settlement, that its information came from the far-right media figure Mike Cernovich, it protected itself and helped its readers. And for good reason: The Post’s video of the encounter with the would-be source was like a master class in reporting as high-wire act.But Project Veritas quickly turned this into a fundraising opportunity for itself, claiming victory and releasing a video that purported to show The Post’s bias against Trump.It depicted a Post reporter explaining the difference between news-side reporting and editorial-page opinion, which has been openly critical of the administration.Some, undoubtedly, believed Project Veritas’ take, cheered and opened their wallets.Are we as a nation so deep into our social-media bubbles and echo chambers that many have lost track of what’s real and what’s fake?It’s a deeply troubling problem but hardly a new one.“If everybody always lies to you, the consequence is not that you believe the lies, but rather that nobody believes anything any longer,” wrote the German-born political theorist Hannah Arendt many decades ago. It tried to make a brazen lie the reason the women’s stories would be dismissed.Happily, The Post’s reporting was rigorous. And luckily, the scheme had all the savvy of a bully who tries to steal your lunch with the principal watching.“Beyond boneheaded,” was the characterization of Byron York, chief political correspondent for the Washington Examiner, aptly noting that stupidity and maliciousness are a bad combination.A win, then, for reality.But a troubling question arises:Who will be believed?Journalists and many thoughtful citizens may have been high-fiving Monday. Breitbart News, as that pro-Trump propaganda machine calls itself, was part of the campaign when it sent staffers (I won’t call them reporters) to Alabama for the express purpose of knocking down a Washington Post story.In it, multiple women agreed to use their real names and to be quoted about Moore’s alleged sexual misconduct or assault when they were girls. (Breitbart ended up confirming The Post’s story but crowed about its own non-findings anyway.)Trump was part of the campaign when he called this week for a trophy to be given for “fake news,” disparaging CNN in particular.And again when he reportedly cast doubt on the validity of the infamous “Access Hollywood” tape in which he bragged about grabbing women’s genitals.There is no question as to the tape’s authenticity.But the new low came Monday as Project Veritas — could its name be any more Orwellian? — was exposed for its clumsy effort to lure The Post into publishing a false story about a woman whose girlhood affair with Moore led to an abortion.This would-be scam won the race to the bottom — so far — because, at its black heart, it mocked the bravery of women telling their own true, painful experiences.center_img Categories: Editorial, OpinionIn the right-wing campaign to discredit the truth, every day brings a new low.I don’t mean Roy Moore’s campaign for U.S. Senate, though that certainly has been at the center, lately, of the broader crusade.No, I mean the insidious drive — led, sadly, by President Donald Trump — to undermine the reality-based press in America and in so doing to eat away at the underpinnings of our democracy: a shared basis in credible, verifiable facts. When The Post clearly laid out how it got its original Moore story — that reporters found and persuaded women to tell their stories — it makes its journalism more bulletproof. News people used to joke that readers should never be allowed to see how the sausage is made. Now we need to show that messy process as clearly as possible. Our very credibility depends on it.Project Veritas prides itself on its ability to do just that – to go behind the carefully lit scenes of media and politics and to show what’s really happening. But its perversion of that mission was on ugly display this week. As a nation tries to keep hold of what’s real, despite a gaslighting president and his corrupt media helpers, we need more of what’s working: rigorous, careful journalism and radical transparency.Margaret M. Sullivan is the media columnist for The Washington Post and the former public editor of The New York Times.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homeslast_img read more

first_img >>>FOLLOW THE COURIER-MAIL REAL ESTATE TEAM ON FACEBOOK<<< Former Lord Mayor Graham Quirk chatting to interested parties at the auction of 6 General St, Hendra on Saturday. He is to become an independent auctioneer. Picture: Debra Bela.“You’ve got to do something in life,” Mr Quirk said, with onlookers calling him a ‘good luck charm’ for the day.“I’m actually going to start auctioneering as an independent auctioneer.“Peter Burgin has given me the opportunity to go around and watch him today.” Brisbane Lord Mayor Graham Quirk inspecting HMAS Brisbane officers in one of his last official engagements as Lord Mayor before handing over to Adrian Schrinner in April. Picture: John Gass, AAP.On May 3 he applied for an auctioneer’s licence and he’s expecting his registration to come through in the next week or so.“I did the REIQ course in 2010 before I was Lord Mayor and I’ve done a lot of charity auctions and horse auctions but this will be something different,” he said.“It will be a bit more out there than some of my press conferences.” Suburbs that are singles hot spots Former Lord Mayor Graham Quirk was an observer at the auction of 6 General St, Hendra. He has applied for his auctioneers licence. Picture: Debra BelaFORMER Lord Mayor Graham Quirk used to run the city, now he’s hoping to sell it.Mr Quirk was discovered on the auction trail on Saturday, in training to become an auctioneer.The man who handed over the keys to the city less than three months ago after eight years at the helm was spotted at the auctions of 6 General St and 75 Pring St in Hendra, learning the ropes from Place auctioneer Peter Burgin. MORE REAL ESTATE STORIEScenter_img Award-winning Place auctioneer Peter Burgin in action. Picture: John Gass, AAP.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus12 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market12 hours agoThe career change comes after Mr Quirk spent three decades in local government before bowing out of politics on April 7. The house at 75 Pring St, Hendra that sold at auction on Saturday for $1.4 million. Picture: supplied.“He’s got a great reputation, a wonderfully honest man and we are happy to have some association with him to see if we could help,” Mr Burgin said.“I think he’ll be great, obviously in terms of his comfort in speaking in front of people but also he’s a down to earth, honest person and that’s important in real estate.” Ensuite without walls goes viral And while he was spotted in north Brisbane yesterday, it is Brisbane south where his new career will be based.“Probably the south siders, I think the multicultural communities will be where my main niche market will be, particularly culturally, to have a former Lord Mayor as the auctioneer might be good. We’ll wait and see.”Mr Quirk went to four auctions in Brisbane on Saturday, in Auchenflower, Hendra and Wavell Heights, with 75 Pring St, Hendra the only house to sell.last_img read more

first_imgAt the same time, despite his weekend remarks, he has enjoyed his time in Detroit, so he very well could be trying to raise his trade value for the good of the team. Either way, Castellanos is pointing out something and that statement could easily influence some of the conversations about his game. We’ll see if this changes his worth in other teams’ eyes though and results in a deal.One thing is for sure though, if and when Castellanos leaves Detroit, he’s not going to miss Comerica.”I mean, they can move in center and right-center field,” he said. “There’s no reason I hit a ball 434 feet off (Nationals right-hander) Anibal Sanchez and it goes in the first row. That shouldn’t happen. But I’m not in charge of that either.” “This park is a joke,” he told reporters, via the Detroit News. “It’s to the point where how are we going to be compared to the rest of the people in the league in terms of power numbers, OPS, slugging and all that stuff when we got a yard out here that’s 420 feet straight across center field?”Castellanos was a top-10 prospect before he made his MLB debut in 2013, but he has never quite developed the power many evaluators thought he would. He was given a future 70-grade power by MLB Pipeline in 2013 which has been given to only a few players such as Miguel Sano with the Twins and Joey Gallo of the Rangers. Related News MLB trade rumors: Cubs interested in Tigers’ Nicholas Castellanos MLB trade rumors: Cubs, Braves may be looking at Tigers’ Nicholas Castellanoscenter_img Despite those projections, he has never hit more than 26 home runs at any level despite power numbers going up across the board in MLB. The 27-year-old seems to have an idea why, and he says opponents even point out part of the problem.”We’ll get on second base or third base and they’ll come up and be like, ‘Man, how do you guys do this?'” Castellanos said. “We play 81 games here, man. I don’t want to hear about the two you hit that are questionable.”To an extent Castellanos does have a point. He has 104 home runs in his career with 60 of those on the road. In his six-plus seasons with the Tigers at Comerica Park, he has hit a home run every 34.9 at-bats. In road games, he homers in every 26.4 at-bats.That is a difference, but it’s not a huge one. It probably comes out to about two home runs hit in an average per year (3,118 career at-bats at 26.4 ABs per home run = 118 career homers or 14 more in total over seven years).So how does this matter in the bigger picture? Castellanos, 27, is a free agent after the season, and it’s unlikely that he’ll re-sign with the Tigers. So Detroit is trying to trade him, and teams like the Cubs are interested. And if he wants to be traded, which he very well could, he might be trying to get better teams interested in him, leading to either a World Series chance this postseason or simply a chance to get with a team he could feel out and possibly consider re-signing with. Nicholas Castellanos is one of the Tigers’ two best trade chips, and he might be trying to help his value in an odd way.The Detroit outfielder hit a walkoff home run in Sunday’s 4-3 win over the Blue Jays, but he chose to vent his frustrations while speaking about the game.last_img read more