Tag: 上海市休闲会所

first_img 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – The “Yes For A Better San Diego” group turned in more than 114,000 signatures to the registrar this afternoon to get its convention center expansion initiative on the November ballot.The measure will have stiff competition on a crowded ballot. The November ballot will include two other high profile measures for developing the Mission Valley site, SoccerCity and SDSU West.KUSI’s Steve Bosh has the details. Categories: Local San Diego News, Politics FacebookTwitter Steve Bosh July 9, 2018 “Yes for a Better San Diego” turns in over 114,000 signatures in support of expanding the Convention Center Posted: July 9, 2018 Steve Bosh, last_img read more

first_imgJP: A genuine editorial justification is that I’m interested in exploring new and different ways to tell stories, and different and innovative ways to do design. We want to offer a more interactive user experience. It’s not just a corporate [mandate]. I’m absolutely sincere that the principle justification for digital-first for Technology Review is a thinking, a mode of being, that promotes innovation and excellence. This will allow us to write smarter and more link-y journalism; to design more beautiful and interactive experiences.Though it is certainly true that print is healthy and not going away, it is by no means a growing business. It is becoming more and more expensive to acquire print readers. At the same time that’s happening, print advertising has been in free fall for the last 15 years. When I was the editor of Red Herring, in the first six months of 2000, we had more than $100 million in print advertising. We did two editions a month with 400 to 500 pages, and 40 percent of these pages was advertising. It is a great month at Technology Review when we have 30 pages of print advertising. When print audiences are not growing and it is becoming increasingly expensive to acquire new readers; when there is declining and stagnant print advertising; we’ve seen our online audiences increase 75 percent year-over-year.For me as a businessman, as I’m the publisher as well as the editor-in-chief, I must follow where the audiences and advertisers are going, and for us, they’re going to electronic media. We feel that some of the unhappiness of traditional publishers is richly deserved. They haven’t provided good service to their marketing partners and their media partners’ ad agencies. FOLIO: How are you defining “good service?” JP: National Journal; Ars Technica has an interesting membership service for Ars Technica Prime; the membership model at GigaOm. We looked outside traditional media business to the new media properties like Amazon, Google and even Facebook to begin to explore what membership and community might look like. We were transparently sincere when we said, ‘we don’t know, tell us what you want.’ We’ll add up all the stuff and try to price it at the level the market can bear. We want to be less like a traditional media company as we think about the membership model, and more like a software or Web company, maybe even like Apple.FOLIO: Describe the models you’ve worked through before getting to this digital-first plan. JP: We have very deliberately worked through a series of experimental models. We tried having an ‘all or nothing’ paywall. As many people discovered, it was the least effective of all possible options. We experimented with a porous paywall, which didn’t work for us because we don’t publish as much as NYT, WSJ or FT. They work well when you’re publishing so much. You have enough readers who are reading this waterfall of editorial that you create sufficient friction. We don’t publish that much, only three to seven stories a day. It’s not enough to create that needed friction. Then we’ve experimented with what has become a default, a paid print magazine and an entirely free site. While it works best, we don’t think that’s the long-term home of Tech Review. We suspect it will be some combination of a free website; one that’s readable on tablets as well as desktop and laptop computers, a print magazine for both national and international for as long as people want it and a membership model that does some innovative things.FOLIO: What is your revenue model now?JP: We are a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit, fully owned corporation of MIT, which doesn’t mean we’re not in business. We are a commercial enterprise. MIT gives me zero venture capital. Everything I want to do has to be funded by cashflow. MIT provides some revenue for an alumni magazine, that is appreciated, but it by no means pays our bills. They also subsidize us in a variety of other ways—our research material is free, we have access to MIT libraries. We receive about a third of our revenue from subscribers/consumers, which includes the newsstand. We receive a third from advertising—two-thirds of that is digital. Within that final third is a mixture of the MIT contribution and what is now our largest and fastest growing line of business, which is a foreign licensing line of business; and things like list rental. JP: You know that old joke which publishers like to chortle about, when marketers say, “I know I’m wasting half my ad dollars, I just don’t know which half?” That must be really infuriating if you’re in the advertising business. Online, we know exactly which advertising dollars are effective, and a strong impulse for going digital first is to provide more unique and more interactive opportunities for our strongest advertising partners and their agencies. There are some intriguing opportunities to which we don’t have all the answers for yet, about constructing a truly digital homologue to the old subscription business around membership and community. FOLIO: What models out there are appealing to you? Technology Review editor-in-chief Jason Pontin recently provided a one-two punch of blog posts detailing a pair of significant digital pivots for the brand. Both have caused a stir among the media crowd for their frank assessment of TR‘s progress in the digital space. The first announced the brand’s plan to ditch the app model after being “deluded” by its initial appeal. The second laid the groundwork for an exploration of a membership model after a series of paid and hybrid digital strategies failed to pan out. Here, Pontin explains what he and the team behind Technology Review have planned next.FOLIO: It’s obvious that the print isn’t going away for Technology Review. You’ve made it clear that it remains important to you.Jason Pontin [JP]: I love print, and we have a very robust international publishing business where print is by and large healthier than in the United States. We have editions in Germany, in China, in India, in Italy—we hope to expand soon to the Middle East, perhaps Russia. To serve our domestic audience and to surprise and delight our international readers, print will always be part of what we do, so long as I’m editor-in-chief and publisher.FOLIO: So then what is driving the digital-first decision? FOLIO: How do you see these portions shifting as you go digital-first?JP: I suspect we’ll remain a three-legged stool, though I’d like to see the width of the legs increase. I’d like to do more foreign publisher business. As our audiences grow, particularly online, I think we’ll see digital advertising swell. I don’t anticipate we’ll significantly increase print circulation, the membership model in some form will swell our consumer revenue.last_img read more

first_imgYouTube is teaming up again with Viacom-owned VidCon for a splashy evening event spotlighting music and homegrown creators at the online-video confab’s flagship U.S. event next month.Recording artist and EDM DJ Marshmello, whose hits “Alone” and “Silence” have over 1 billion YouTube views, will headline the YouTube OnStage event and perform several of his fan favorites. Marshmello has over 14 million subscribers and 2.4 billion views to date on his three-year-old YouTube channel.YouTube OnStage also will feature appearances by top creators, including Liza Koshy — who will appear alongside the cast of her YouTube original series “Liza on Demand” — along with Collins Key, Merrick Hanna, Kyle Hanagami and others.The event will be held Thursday, June 21, at The Arena at the Anaheim Convention Center in Anaheim, Calif., and will be open to all VidCon attendees through a ticket-lottery system. ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15 Popular on Variety center_img The fact that YouTube is putting the spotlight on music by enlisting Marshmello (the stage name of Christopher Comstock) underscores the importance of music to the Google-owned video giant. Next week, Google is launching YouTube Music, a subscription service priced at $10 per month, with ad-free access to millions of songs. In addition, the YouTube Red subscription service is going away, replaced by YouTube Premium ($12 monthly) for access to ad-free video, music and YouTube originals.It’s the second year YouTube is throwing a party at VidCon US. The 90-minute show at VidCon is sponsored by LEGO Systems and Sony Pictures Animation’s “Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation.”In 2017, VidCon’s Anaheim convention drew over 30,000 fans, creators, and industry execs. VidCon, which was founded by YouTube vloggers Hank and John Green, was acquired by Viacom earlier this year. The Australian version of VidCon is in its second year, and Viacom has announced that it will take the franchise to the U.K. with VidCon London slated for February 2019.last_img read more

first_img More information: Frédérique Valentin et al. Early Lapita skeletons from Vanuatu show Polynesian craniofacial shape: Implications for Remote Oceanic settlement and Lapita origins, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2015). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1516186113AbstractWith a cultural and linguistic origin in Island Southeast Asia the Lapita expansion is thought to have led ultimately to the Polynesian settlement of the east Polynesian region after a time of mixing/integration in north Melanesia and a nearly 2,000-y pause in West Polynesia. One of the major achievements of recent Lapita research in Vanuatu has been the discovery of the oldest cemetery found so far in the Pacific at Teouma on the south coast of Efate Island, opening up new prospects for the biological definition of the early settlers of the archipelago and of Remote Oceania in general. Using craniometric evidence from the skeletons in conjunction with archaeological data, we discuss here four debated issues: the Lapita–Asian connection, the degree of admixture, the Lapita–Polynesian connection, and the question of secondary population movement into Remote Oceania. Citation: Skulls in ancient cemetery on Vanuatu suggest Polynesians as first settlers (2015, December 29) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-12-skulls-ancient-cemetery-vanuatu-polynesians.html Explore further The researchers focused on skulls dug from the bottom of a cemetery on Efate Island, which has been dated back to approximately 3,000 years ago, making it the oldest in the South Pacific. The skulls, the team reports, belong to a people known as the Lapita, who are believed to have been the earliest settlers of the islands. The team compared the skulls with those of people currently living on the island and also other parts of Polynesia and Melanesia and concluded that the ancient skulls were closest in structure to modern Asians and Polynesians. This news came as a bit of a surprise because the current natives most resemble Melanesians. The researchers believe that the evidence suggests that Melanesia people arrived sometime after the Lapita had already populated the islands in the area and interbred with the people already living there.The researchers note that other evidence of the ancient Lapita people still exists as well—those living on the island share many cultural and linguistic similarities with early Polynesians, for example. But, they also add, it still doesn’t adequately address the issue of how it was that people living 3,000 years ago managed to navigate and populate an island group so far from their home—a path that would have taken them from South-East Asia through Melanesia and then into Polynesia, while somehow not leaving any evidence that they had mixed with the Melanesians. Their findings do suggest though, that the islands of Vanuatu may have served as a springboard of sorts, offering the early settlers a place to jump to other parts of the vast Pacific Ocean. Teouma Lapita skulls. Credit: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2015). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1516186113 (Phys.org)—A small team of researchers from France and Australia has found evidence in a very old cemetery (first discovered back in 2004) on one of the islands of Vanuatu that suggests that early Asians and Polynesians were the first human settlers, not Melanesians as many have suggested. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes how the question of the origin of the people of the Pacific Islands has confounded visitors from the west since perhaps the 16th century and why they believe their study finally provides the answers.center_img Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. South Pacific Island’s earliest inhabitants relied primarily on foraging, not horticulture © 2015 Phys.orglast_img read more

first_imgDue to popular demand, Palate Fest returns with a special treat to tide you over until the next autumn fest. Palate ‘Mini’- cozier and more compact, gives you a chance to experience a taste of Palate Fest in a more intimate way.Aditi Kapoor and Ruchi Sibal, in association with NDMC, kick start this spring with Palate Mini 2015 – Delhi’s most delicious weekend.The festival will feature some of Delhi’s most upcoming and popular eateries whipping up some lip-smacking preparations, along with a food market for gourmet products.Highlights of the festival will be over 15 leading cafes participating in the fest. Market Square with 30 ‘Shoplets’ for Indian and International gourmet products and ingredients and live entertainment all three days will keep the visitors spellbound.Come and witness the Delhi’s Most Delicious Spring weekend!Where: Nehru Park, When: March 13 – 15 Timing: 1 PM till 11 PMlast_img read more