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first_img October 24, 2018 KUSI Newsroom KUSI Newsroom, Posted: October 24, 2018 SAN DIEGO (KUSI) — The ride-hailing service Lyft will offer discounted and free rides to San Diego residents on Nov. 6 to make voting in the mid-term election easier.The Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement found that for prospective voters, especially those between ages 18 and 29, lack of transportation is one of the biggest detriments to voting. Roughly 19 percent of young voters with college credits and 35 percent of young voters without any college experience failed to vote in 2016 because they lacked a way to get to a polling station.Citing that data, Lyft is offering 50 percent off rides to the polls throughout the county on Election Day. Lyft will also offer free rides in certain zip codes because of donations from nonprofits like Voto Latino, the National Federation of the Blind and the San Diego-based Faith in Action.At Lyft, we’re working to improve lives by connecting people and their communities through the world’s best transportation. This Election Day, we want to help people in San Diego County exercise their right to vote,” said Lyft San Diego Market Manager Hao Meng. “Every voice is important, and we’re excited to help make them heard in this year’s elections.”Residents can visit buzzfeed.com/pollup2018/welcome-to-pollup2018 to receive their 50-percent-off promo codes as well as check to see if they are eligible to have their fare waived. Lyft offering free and discounted rides in San Diego on election day Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

first_img Updated: 10:36 PM Ashlie Rodriguez, Posted: October 29, 2018 Thousands honor Pittsburgh synagogue victims at community vigil October 29, 2018 Categories: Local San Diego News, National & International News FacebookTwitter 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsLA JOLLA (KUSI) – Thousands poured into congregation Beth Israel tonight to pay tribute to the eleven victims of the Pittsburgh synagogue shooting.Their presence, a massive show of solidarity against hate here in San Diego.KUSI’s Ashlie Rodriguez was live Monday evening at UTC with more. RELATED: Synagogue massacre defendant appears in court in wheelchair Ashlie Rodriguez last_img read more

first_imgJP: A genuine editorial justification is that I’m interested in exploring new and different ways to tell stories, and different and innovative ways to do design. We want to offer a more interactive user experience. It’s not just a corporate [mandate]. I’m absolutely sincere that the principle justification for digital-first for Technology Review is a thinking, a mode of being, that promotes innovation and excellence. This will allow us to write smarter and more link-y journalism; to design more beautiful and interactive experiences.Though it is certainly true that print is healthy and not going away, it is by no means a growing business. It is becoming more and more expensive to acquire print readers. At the same time that’s happening, print advertising has been in free fall for the last 15 years. When I was the editor of Red Herring, in the first six months of 2000, we had more than $100 million in print advertising. We did two editions a month with 400 to 500 pages, and 40 percent of these pages was advertising. It is a great month at Technology Review when we have 30 pages of print advertising. When print audiences are not growing and it is becoming increasingly expensive to acquire new readers; when there is declining and stagnant print advertising; we’ve seen our online audiences increase 75 percent year-over-year.For me as a businessman, as I’m the publisher as well as the editor-in-chief, I must follow where the audiences and advertisers are going, and for us, they’re going to electronic media. We feel that some of the unhappiness of traditional publishers is richly deserved. They haven’t provided good service to their marketing partners and their media partners’ ad agencies. FOLIO: How are you defining “good service?” JP: National Journal; Ars Technica has an interesting membership service for Ars Technica Prime; the membership model at GigaOm. We looked outside traditional media business to the new media properties like Amazon, Google and even Facebook to begin to explore what membership and community might look like. We were transparently sincere when we said, ‘we don’t know, tell us what you want.’ We’ll add up all the stuff and try to price it at the level the market can bear. We want to be less like a traditional media company as we think about the membership model, and more like a software or Web company, maybe even like Apple.FOLIO: Describe the models you’ve worked through before getting to this digital-first plan. JP: We have very deliberately worked through a series of experimental models. We tried having an ‘all or nothing’ paywall. As many people discovered, it was the least effective of all possible options. We experimented with a porous paywall, which didn’t work for us because we don’t publish as much as NYT, WSJ or FT. They work well when you’re publishing so much. You have enough readers who are reading this waterfall of editorial that you create sufficient friction. We don’t publish that much, only three to seven stories a day. It’s not enough to create that needed friction. Then we’ve experimented with what has become a default, a paid print magazine and an entirely free site. While it works best, we don’t think that’s the long-term home of Tech Review. We suspect it will be some combination of a free website; one that’s readable on tablets as well as desktop and laptop computers, a print magazine for both national and international for as long as people want it and a membership model that does some innovative things.FOLIO: What is your revenue model now?JP: We are a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit, fully owned corporation of MIT, which doesn’t mean we’re not in business. We are a commercial enterprise. MIT gives me zero venture capital. Everything I want to do has to be funded by cashflow. MIT provides some revenue for an alumni magazine, that is appreciated, but it by no means pays our bills. They also subsidize us in a variety of other ways—our research material is free, we have access to MIT libraries. We receive about a third of our revenue from subscribers/consumers, which includes the newsstand. We receive a third from advertising—two-thirds of that is digital. Within that final third is a mixture of the MIT contribution and what is now our largest and fastest growing line of business, which is a foreign licensing line of business; and things like list rental. JP: You know that old joke which publishers like to chortle about, when marketers say, “I know I’m wasting half my ad dollars, I just don’t know which half?” That must be really infuriating if you’re in the advertising business. Online, we know exactly which advertising dollars are effective, and a strong impulse for going digital first is to provide more unique and more interactive opportunities for our strongest advertising partners and their agencies. There are some intriguing opportunities to which we don’t have all the answers for yet, about constructing a truly digital homologue to the old subscription business around membership and community. FOLIO: What models out there are appealing to you? Technology Review editor-in-chief Jason Pontin recently provided a one-two punch of blog posts detailing a pair of significant digital pivots for the brand. Both have caused a stir among the media crowd for their frank assessment of TR‘s progress in the digital space. The first announced the brand’s plan to ditch the app model after being “deluded” by its initial appeal. The second laid the groundwork for an exploration of a membership model after a series of paid and hybrid digital strategies failed to pan out. Here, Pontin explains what he and the team behind Technology Review have planned next.FOLIO: It’s obvious that the print isn’t going away for Technology Review. You’ve made it clear that it remains important to you.Jason Pontin [JP]: I love print, and we have a very robust international publishing business where print is by and large healthier than in the United States. We have editions in Germany, in China, in India, in Italy—we hope to expand soon to the Middle East, perhaps Russia. To serve our domestic audience and to surprise and delight our international readers, print will always be part of what we do, so long as I’m editor-in-chief and publisher.FOLIO: So then what is driving the digital-first decision? FOLIO: How do you see these portions shifting as you go digital-first?JP: I suspect we’ll remain a three-legged stool, though I’d like to see the width of the legs increase. I’d like to do more foreign publisher business. As our audiences grow, particularly online, I think we’ll see digital advertising swell. I don’t anticipate we’ll significantly increase print circulation, the membership model in some form will swell our consumer revenue.last_img read more

first_img ADC AUTHOR Kay Ivey, Governor of Alabama, has been recognized as the recipient of the Association of Defense Community’s 2019 State Leadership Award.Ivey and other ADC Award honorees were recognized Monday during a lunch ceremony at the 2019 Defense Communities Annual Summit.Known as a champion for her state’s installations, defense communities and military service population, Gov. Ivey has championed wide-ranging legislation to improve the quality of life for service members and their families since 2017.In May 2018, Ivey signed several service-related quality of life bills, including the Military Family Jobs Opportunity Act, which provides professional licensure reciprocity for military spouses across numerous state agencies. She also signed the Parks for Patriots bill, which grants free state parks admission to active or retired Alabama service members.Ivey was also an integral part of the state’s campaign to secure the fifth-generation F-35 Fighter mission for the 187th Fighter Wing at Maxwell Air Force Base.“While many people were involved in the multi-year selection process for the F-35 Fighter Wing, the governor led our state through this journey with distinction, and she was instrumental in bringing this next-generation aircraft to Montgomery,” U.S. Rep. Martha Roby (R-Ala.) said. “I am incredibly proud of Gov. Ivey’s leadership and commitment to Alabama’s military footprint,” Roby added.Army photo by Sgt. William Fryelast_img read more

first_imgProthom Alo illustrationTwo sisters were killed as a passenger bus fell into a roadside canal at Jaintiapur in Sylhet, witnesses and police said.The accident took place at Katagang area of Sylhet-Tamabil highway on Wednesday afternoon.The deceased are Lubna Begum, 10 and Ahna Begum, 14, daughters of Showkat Ali of Fulbari village of Jaintiapur. More 15 passengers were rescued and they received treatment at Jaintiapur upazila health complex.Quoting witnesses, police said the driver of Sylhet-bound bus from Zaflong lost control over the steering while overtaking another bus at Katagang area of Jaintiapur.The bus overturned and plunged into a roadside canal after hitting an electric pole, leaving two sisters dead on the spot, police said.Jaintiapur police station officer-in-charge Khan Mohammad Moinul Zakir told Prothom Alo that the bodies were sent to MAJ Osmani Medical College Hospital morgue for autopsy. The bus was seized, he added.last_img read more

first_img 2 min read Register Now » November 1, 2013 Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Globalcenter_img Howard Schultz has stepped down from the board of Square, to be replaced by former Goldman Sachs exec David Viniar. Schultz’s exit from the mobile-payment company comes as no shock, as the Starbucks CEO took the position planning to stay for a year. Schultz joined Square’s board last August, investing $25 million to use its technology to process credit card payments in Starbucks stores. “Jack (Dorsey) has assembled a strong and forward-thinking leadership team at Square,” said Schultz in a statement. “I am proud of what our companies have accomplished together this past year and I’m excited about the opportunities for Starbucks and Square to continue to innovate.” Related: 3 Ways Starbucks Is Innovating and Why You Should CareRecent Starbucks innovations include Tweet-a-coffee, increasing its number of cloud-based Clover coffee-brewing machines and opening a tea bar. Innovating has paid off: On Wednesday, the coffee chain reported that total net revenues increased 13 percent in the fourth quarter, with earnings per share rising 37 percent. Schultz’s replacement, David Viniar, was most recently chief financial officer of Goldman Sachs. He worked for the company for more than 30 years. “David’s extraordinary financial insight and expertise will add another valuable perspective to our world-class board,” Dorsey, CEO of Square and co-founder of Twitter, said in a statement. Square’s Board of Directors also includes co-founder Jim McKelvey, Larry Summers, Roelof Botha, Vinod Khosla and Mary Meeker.Related: Square Makes Money Transfers as Easy as Sending an Email  Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box.last_img read more