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first_img “A giant has passed away,” said USC athletic director Mike Garrett, the Heisman Trophy-winning tailback who was an outfielder for Dedeaux in 1965. “This is a tremendous loss to USC and the entire baseball community. It leaves a huge void in all of baseball. “From coach Dedeaux, I learned how to win and how important it was to win in any sport. For him, winning was a way of life.” At the same time UCLA’s basketball team and USC’s football team were dominating their respective sports in the 1960s and 1970s, one could make the argument the greatest Los Angeles dynasty of them all was Rod Dedeaux’s USC baseball team. Dedeaux, who died Thursday in Glendale at the age of 91 from complications from a Dec. 2 stroke, won a record 11 NCAA Championships, a whopping 28 consecutive conference titles and produced nearly 60 future major leaguers. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECoach Doc Rivers a “fan” from way back of Jazz’s Jordan Clarkson Nearly 200 of his players went on to the pro level, and 60 USC players under Dedeaux went on to major-league careers, including Mark McGwire, Randy Johnson, Tom Seaver, Dave Kingman, Fred Lynn and Roy Smalley. While accepting a contract for $1 per season, Dedeaux had the most wins in NCAA Division I history – 1,332 – until Cliff Gustafson of Texas surpassed him in 1994. He also had winning seasons in 41 of his 45 years with the Trojans. Under Dedeaux, USC went 37 years without a losing season. “Rod not only was college baseball’s greatest coach, he was the sport’s and USC’s greatest ambassador,” said current USC baseball head coach Mike Gillespie, an outfielder on Dedeaux’s 1961 national championship squad. “His passing is felt by all Trojans. All of us in the USC baseball program mourn his loss and send our heartfelt feelings and prayers to the Dedeaux family.” Dedeaux’s mentor was Casey Stengel, who also lived in Glendale. Former Dodgers manager and Hall of Famer Tommy Lasorda says he considered Dedeaux his mentor. center_img “I’ll cherish the days that I spent with him and traveled with him,” Lasorda said Thursday night. “He was my idol and he was my friend” for 43 years. Lasorda said Dedeaux’s family put a TV in his room Wednesday night so he could see the national championship football game between USC and Texas. The Trojans’ national championships included five in a row from 1970-74 – at a time when no other school had ever won two in a row. Born Raoul Martial Dedeaux in New Orleans, he moved to California as a youngster and starred at Hollywood High in the early 1930s. Dedeaux, who also played three seasons for USC, appeared in two games at shortstop for the 1935 Brooklyn Dodgers, going 1 for 4 with an RBI. He often described his big-league career as: “I had a cup of coffee with no sugar in it.” When Dedeaux retired in 1986, the USC baseball field had already been named in his honor for 12 years. Besides making a mark with the collegiate game, Dedeaux also spearheaded the development of amateur baseball nationally and internationally. He was instrumental in bringing baseball to the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles as a demonstration sport and coached the silver medal-winning U.S. team. He also coached the U.S. amateur team that played in Tokyo in conjunction with the 1964 Olympics. Hollywood enlisted Dedeaux’s expertise as well, inviting him to serve as a technical director and consultant for two highly successful movies: “Field of Dreams” and “A League of Their Own.” Away from baseball, Dedeaux served as president of Dart Transportation, Inc., a million-dollar trucking firm that specializes in worldwide distribution. He founded the company in the 1930s. Funeral services for Dedeaux are pending. He is survived by his wife, Helen, sons Justin and Terry and daughters Michele and Denise, and nine grandchildren, including current USC freshman first baseman/outfielder Adam Dedeaux. In lieu of flowers, the family has asked that donations be made to the Rod Dedeaux Foundation, which promotes amateur athletics, at 1430 So. Eastman Ave., Los Angeles 90023. The Associated Press contributed to this story. Vincent Bonsignore, (818) 713-3612 vincent.bonsignore@dailynews.com A CAREER PERSPECTIVE Years as USC’s baseball coach: 45 (1942 to 1986). National titles: 11, including five in a row from 1970-74. Conference titles: 28 Career record: 1,332 wins, 571 losses, 11 ties. Among the 200 future pro players he coached at USC: Tom Seaver, Mark McGwire, Randy Johnson, Dave Kingman, Roy Smalley, Fred Lynn. Career highlights: Coached the 1964 and 1984 exhibition Olympic U.S. baseball teams; named “Coach of the Century” by Baseball America and Collegiate Baseball in 1999. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

first_imgUPDATED: To reflect clarification of interior sq. ft. for each unit in Rainbow Duplex.Given all the money and marketing that went into the construction of Austria Passive House 2010 – a showcase for Austrian Passivhaus construction products and techniques that attracted a lot of attention during last year’s Winter Olympics in Vancouver, British Columbia – members of the design-and-construction team that worked on the building thought it made good business sense to apply their know-how to a residential project that not only strives for Passivhaus performance but is also affordable.The 3,000-sq.-ft. Austria Passive House, or Austria House, as it was widely known, served as a communications center for the Austrian Olympic Committee and now is operated as an outdoor-activities center by the resort municipality of Whistler, which had donated the land for the project. Austria House cost about $1.23 million to build, including a $143,000 grant by the Whistler Blackcomb Foundation, although many of the construction materials for the project were donated by Austrian companies to help market their products.Emphasizing housing opportunities for local employeesBuilder Dürfeld Constructors, a Whistler-based company that was general contractor on the Austria House, and Marken Projects, a designer based in Vancouver, are now teaming up on an affordable-housing follow-up called the Rainbow Duplex. To help control costs, the project’s floor, walls, and roof will be built from prefabricated panels and will incorporate “as many local, renewable, and recycled materials as possible,” Marken says on its website.Construction started just a few weeks ago, and the duplex is scheduled for completion in the fall or 2011. Each unit will include four bedrooms and two baths in about 1,450 sq. ft. of living area, plus about 700 sq. ft. of garage and basement. The project is part of the Resort Municipality of Whistler’s Resident Housing initiative, whose affordability requirements are designed to keep costs on new construction below Whistler’s (relatively high) average real estate prices, and to provide housing for the community’s resident employees. Projects in the Resident Housing program typically are built on infill lots rather than in outlying areas, in keeping with Whistler’s goal of housing 75% of its workforce locally.A first step toward lowering construction costsDürfeld Constructors is building the panels – TJI joists with wood fiberboard on the outside, oriented strand board on the inside, and blown-in cellulose – to R-47 for the walls, R-67 for the main floor, and R-63 for the roof. Optiwin windows and siding will be installed before the panels are delivered to the site, Alex Maurer, a director of Marken Projects affiliate Fab-Homes, told GBA. (Fab-Homes offers a range of relatively inexpensive designs for homes that include a number of Passivhaus features.)The units will be equipped with Zehnder 350 heat recovery ventilators and Comfofond subsoil heat exchangers. Maurer expects the per-square-foot cost for the Rainbow Duplex to come in at a little more than $200, although the design-build team has come up with ways to fine-tune the prefabricated-panel system to further reduce costs. The per-square-foot cost for a second, similar project now underway, for example, is expected to be around $170, says Maurer, who adds that most of the savings will come from significantly shortening the on-site assembly time. For a single-family project, he says, assembly of the prefabricated panels now can be completed in as little as eight hours.last_img read more

first_imgThe initial trends in the counting of 32 Sikkim Assembly seats and the lone Lok Sabha seat indicate a close contest where the Opposition Sikkim Krantikari Morcha (SKM) is leading over the Sikkim Democratic Front (SDF), that has remained in power for 25 years.Out of seven Assembly seats for which the trends are out the SKM is leading in four and the SDF in three. In the Lok Sabha seat, Indra Hang Subba of the SKM is leading over the SDF’s D.B. Katwal by a margin of over 6,350 votes. The SKM led by P.S. Goley is taking of SDF’s Pawan Chamling who has the record of being the longest serving Chief Minister of the country. The vote share at the Assembly level also indicate a close contest where the SKM’s vote share of 47.6 % whereas the SDF has secured 47.1 % votes.last_img read more

first_imgPHILADELPHIA — A couple more homers weren’t enough to give the New York Mets a sweep.Peter Bourjos drove in the winning run on an infield single with two outs in the 11th inning to lift the Philadelphia Phillies to a 5-4 win on April 20.Yoenis Cespedes and Lucas Duda hit consecutive homers and Neil Walker had four hits for the Mets.The Mets hit 12 homers in the three-game series and have 19 homers in the past six games, all on the road. It’s a franchise record for a six-game span. They hit back-to-homers in three straight games, also a franchise first. Duda and Walker connected in a row in lopsided wins April 18 and April 19.“When you strike out 17 times, you might have swung and missed at too many pitches out of the zone,” Mets Manager Terry Collins said. “That’s what happens when you see quality pitches.”Freddy Galvis hit a two-run homer for the Phillies. Jeanmar Gomez (2-0) tossed two scoreless innings for the win.Galvis ripped a one-out double to right off Hansel Robles (0-1) with one out in the 11th.After David Lough was intentionally walked, the runners advanced on a wild pitch. The Mets started to walk pinch-hitter Emmanuel Burriss but decided to pitch to him after a 2-0 count. Burriss swung and missed and then fouled off a suicide squeeze attempt before flying out to shallow center.Bourjos hit a sharp bouncer down the third-base line. David Wright made a backhanded grab but the speedy ninth-place hitter easily beat the throw and Galvis scored.“I know he is a fast runner so it was a catch-and-release kind of thing,” Wright said. “The only way I could get him would be if he stumbled out of the box.”Lough’s sacrifice fly gave the Phillies their first lead in the series, 3-2, in the fourth. Cespedes then launched his fifth homer in the fifth and Duda followed with a towering shot off a video board in right field to give the Mets a 4-3 lead.The Phillies tied it in the seventh when Bourjos singled home Lough with two outs.Mets starter Bartolo Colon allowed three runs and four hits in six innings.Phillies starter Jeremy Hellickson gave up four runs and 10 hits in 4 1/3 innings.Asdrubal Cabrera put the Mets up 1-0 on a ground-rule double that appeared to be a three-run homer. Cabrera trotted around the bases when his high drive to right ended up in the stands. But a video review showed the ball bounced off a fan’s glove and landed in another fan’s hands.Walker returned to third base after the replay and then scored on a wild pitch to make it 2-0.The Phillies quickly answered in the bottom half. After Carlos Ruiz hit a single, Galvis hit an opposite-field shot to left-center to tie it at 2-2.(ROB MAADDI, AP Sports Writer) TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more