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first_imgJunior Griffin Smith doesn’t like to admit it, but his teammates insist he’s a perfectionist.Standing at 6-foot-3 and with a lean, athletic frame, Smith is hard to miss when he’s playing ultimate frisbee. He admits he’s not one of the team’s most skilled players, but as the president of the team, his attention to detail has become invaluable.Smith never wanted to be president. He wanted to be a captain, but realized the other players running for the position had more experience and knew the sport better, he said. This year, the club’s leadership made an overhaul by bringing in a new captain, two new coaches and a new president in Smith. He’s in charge of the team’s budget, planning tournaments and ensuring each member has filed the correct paperwork.“I don’t have that much game knowledge, Smith said, “So being able to help with logistics, paperwork, and making sure everything runs smoothly would probably help the team more than any strategy I give.”Luca Serio, one of three captains on the team, said Smith “really accelerated (to) the role of a president through his organization and ability to remain on top of things.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSmith ran for president unopposed, and now serves as the liaison between the club’s director and the rest of the team. He also coordinates game plans with the three team captains. Though Smith is nursing a pulled hamstring now, Serio said he’s noticed the improvements Smith has made as a player — Smith’s only been playing ultimate since his senior year of high school.“He continues to come to every practice, and he’s helping the other injured kids just get better,” Serio said. “He is determined to become a better thrower than I am, and he tells me that every day, and he does things in practice to prove it to me.”Trevor Kaminski, a freshman on the ultimate team, said Griffin and the rest of leadership made it a priority to foster a family-like bond amongst the team. One time, Smith invited a few rookies to the team house and cooked them ribs and macaroni and cheese. He then walked Kaminski home to Dellplain Hall to make sure he was safe.“I just see him as another resource,” Kaminski said. “He’s always positive and goes out of his way to help people, and it doesn’t matter who you are. He knows a lot about SU and even just life in general.”When Smith’s not on the field or running the ultimate frisbee club, he works as a student supervisor at MakerSpace, SU’s 3D printing and design studio. He’s also developed a Google Drive with homework, quizzes and tests to help engineering students on the ultimate team, Serio said.Karleigh Merritt-Henry | Digital Design EditorSmith is a mechanical engineering major, and he spends much of his free time — roughly 10 hours per week —in MakerSpace. He is currently working on two bioengineering projects. He leads a team in building a cheap bone drill for a nonprofit in India, and helps manufacture a rehabilitation device for patients with spinal stenosis.“He is always creating things, like magnets, stickers, and cutouts for t-shirts,” Serio said. “It’s pretty cool for him to be able to do that, and it’s really exciting to watch him go through all that stuff.”Despite a heavy course load —he also minors in computer science and biology — Smith said he’s not challenged by balancing his classwork with MakerSpace activities or the ultimate frisbee team, which practices three times a week and has tournaments on the weekends. Smith avoids all of social media except Facebook, he said, avoiding distractions that would “take away any bandwidth.”Smith spent the past summer working for CELLINK in Boston, Massachusetts, which makes 3D bioprinters. Smith said his dream job is to continue working with bioprinting, particularly the process of 3D printing with cells.“I have always wanted to help make something that can help save and improve people’s lives even after I’m gone, and I think this is certainly a way,” Smith said. Published on October 15, 2019 at 11:52 pm alsafaya@syr.edu Commentscenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

first_imgChelsea owner Roman Abramovich is ready to ­perform a major U-turn and re-open contract talks with Frank Lampard, writes the Sunday People.Sunday People Sport can reveal the Blues are close to announcing the£15million signing of Spain Under-21 international midfielder Isco but they are open to the idea of long-serving Lampard staying.After telling the club legend that he could leave, Stamford Bridge sources now insist they want to talk about a new deal.Lampard’s representatives have yet to hear from Chelsea, but the player is keen to stay in the hope of persuading the club to offer him a two-year agreement. Lampard scored a penalty in Chelsea’s 5-1 FA Cup demolition of Southampton yesterday to go level with Kerry Dixon on 193 goals for Blues.He is now just 10 goals shy of breaking Bobby Tambling’s club record of 202 – a mark Lampard is desperate to overhaul.Interim Blues boss Benitez said: “Frank is a good pro, he is doing well, he is under contract, and he is doing fine. I know they have conversations (over his contract) sometimes but the main thing for me as coach is to bring the best out of him.” Manchester United are considering a swoop for Lampard if the Blues fail to tie him up to an extension – and QPR are willing to offer Lamps a two-and-a-half year deal.But whatever happens to Lampard, Malaga starlet Isco is bound for Stamford Bridge.The Spanish club need to bring in significant sums of money in January to pay a huge tax bill.It is not yet clear whether Isco will move to west London this month or remain at Malaga for the rest of the season, possibly on a loan-back deal. The 20-year-old is an attacking midfielder who has scored six times for Malaga this season.last_img read more

first_imgSINGER ISLAND (WSVN) — A barge washed onto a Singer Island beach, Thursday, the Coast Guard said.The Coast Guard said the empty barge washed ashore after it disconnected from a tow boat.Crews are now working to remove the vessel as officials try to figure out who owns it and where it was heading.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img