Tag: 杭州桑拿

first_imgThe Jamaica Olympic Association (JOA) named eight athletes who are involved in a camp in preparation for participation at the fifth Commonwealth Youth Games in Apia, Samoa from September 5-11. The announcement was made by Alan Beckford, JOA director and chef de mission of the team, at a press conference held at the JOA offices yesterday. Joan Rattray will double as assistant chef de mission and medical officer. The athletes are all national junior champions at the recently held National Championships and also World Youth Games representatives. The list include: (Females) – Junelle Bromfield (400m hurdles), Satanya Wright (400m). Males – Michael Bentley (200m, 4x400m relay), Lushane Wilson (800m, 4x400m), Jauavney James (400m, 4x400m), Leonardo Ledgister (300m hurdles, 3x400m), Leon Clarke (800m, 4x400m) and Kevin Nedrick (discus, shot put). The coach is Michael McIntosh. Track and field athletes apart, swimming will be represented by Annabella Lyn and Joseph Black. The coach is Wendy Lee. Natalie Neita-Headley, minister with responsibility for sports, urged the athletes to give of their best. “We have grown accustomed as a country to doing well in everything that we do as we only want the best. While we have great expectations as a people, we want you to do your best as that will be good enough,” the minister encouraged. “You give of your best and if you remain disciplined, if you remain dope-free, we are happy to have you represent Jamaica, so as you go off, remember this. Congrats to the JOA for creating the opportunity for you. Take this journey seriously for your life depends on it, your future depends on it,” she added. Michael Fennell, JOA president, spoke a bit of the history of the Commonwealth Youth Games, that started 15 years ago in Scotland. “The Commonwealth Youth Games has attracted seven sports, but has been growing steadily. It is not at the level of the Youth World Games or Youth Olympics,” Fennell shared. “UNICEF will once again partner with the Commonwealth and will conduct a number of workshops during the Games in Samoa for the young people. In addition to the sports, the focus will be on the athletes’ personal development. This we are very happy for.” The team will leave on August 31 and is slated to arrive in Samoa on September 2.last_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Western bean cutworm (WBCW) populations decreased for all monitoring counties in Ohio for week ending August 4. A total of 72 traps were monitored in 23 counties. Overall, 653 WBCW adults were captured. The state average per trap decreased from 21 WBCW (week ending July 28) to 9 WBCW (week ending July 28).Amy Raudenbush, Kelley Tilmon, Andy Michel, Mark Badertscher, Amanda Bennett, Lee Beers, JD Bethel, Bruce Clevenger, Sam Custer, Thomas Dehaas, Allen Gahler, Mike Gastier, Jason Hartschuh, Ed Lentz, Rory Lewandowski, David Marrison, Sarah Noggle, Les Ober, Adrian Pekarcik, Eric Richer, Garth Ruff, John Schoenhals, Jeff Stachler, Alan Sundermeier, and Chris Zoller monitored the western bean cutworm traps.  Figure 1. Average western bean cutworm (WBCW) trap counts within participating counties for week ending August 4, 2017. Number represents the average WBCW per trap in each county.Figure 2. Overall average number of western bean cutworm adults captured in traps in Ohio.last_img read more

first_imgThe huge Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating Station in the California desert generates electricity with thousands of mirrors that focus sunlight on towers as high as 40-story buildings. But the technological marvel, which can produce enough electricity for 140,000 homes, is apparently proving fatal to a growing number of birds, according to published reports.News outlets that include The Wall Street Journal and the public television station KCET said dozens of birds have died around the towers, apparently as a result of flying through the 1,000-degree temperatures created by the focused sunlight.The $2.2 billion plant, located on a five-square-mile piece of federal land near the California-Nevada border, is owned by NRG Energy, Google, and BrightSource Energy, The Journal reported. The 347,000 mirrors are arranged around towers more than 450 ft. high, each capped with a boiler. The intense sunlight produces steam, which powers generators.Workers began finding dead birds at the project in the months before it started generating power in December. Some of them seemed to have burned feathers. They included a peregrine falcon, hawks, nighthawks, warblers and sparrows. KCET reported the plant’s owners conducted surveys in September to look for birds. The surveys were limited to an area directly around the towers that totaled about 156 acres, less than 5% of the project’s total footprint.The Journal quoted a NRG spokesman as saying it was too soon to draw any “definitive conclusions about long-term impacts on avian or other species.”BrightSource had proposed a similar solar farm east of Palm Springs, but California’s Energy Commission suggested the company use different technology, such as solar panels.Wind farms have had their own problems with bird and bat fatalities. Biologists estimate that wind farms have killed dozens of bald and golden eagles as well as 600,000 bats.last_img read more

first_imgPalace: Duterte to hear out security execs on alleged China control of NGCP Cayetano dares Lacson, Drilon to take lie-detector test: Wala akong kinita sa SEA Games BREAKING: Cop killed, 11 hurt in Misamis Oriental grenade blast BSP survey: PH banks see bright horizon amid dark global recession clouds Every 18 seconds someone is diagnosed with HIV Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ BREAKING: Cop killed, 11 hurt in Misamis Oriental grenade blast Oping Sumalinog. PBA IMAGESLearning from the likes of Jayson Castro and Ranidel de Ocampo, Oping Sumalinog wants to impart the knowledge he gained in the two years he spent with TNT KaTropa in his stint with Cignal HD in the 2017 PBA D-League Foundation Cup.“It was a huge learning experience for me even though I was just a practice player there for two years,” he said in Filipino. “Not many people see me work every day, but I take my job personally and I really love basketball. Day-in and day-out, that’s what I do, so as much as possible, I really wanted to learn from veterans like Jayson.”ADVERTISEMENT That’s why Sumalinog didn’t hesitate to take responsibility for the Hawkeyes’ 86-84 loss to Flying V last Thursday, where the squad lost hold of an eight-point lead in the last four minutes.“I own what happened to us against Flying V. I felt I didn’t contribute as much which is why we lost. I look at it as a wake-up call because this is a D-League and there’s a lot of good players and teams here. We can’t take anyone for granted,” he said.With Cignal back on the winning track, Sumalinog is optimistic that this good run will continue in the games to come, which in turn, could help the younger players boost their draft stocks while also pushing the veterans to get closer to another crack in the PBA.“I’m grabbing every opportunity that I get. I know different players have different stories. There are players who go to the path that I took, who became practice players to PBA teams. I know it’s an unconventional path, but I learned there that you really have to work hard for everything. You need to have the patience. I know my time will come, so hopefully, we’ll be able to sustain the way we play,” he said.ADVERTISEMENTcenter_img On Thursday, Sumalinog showed that he’s more than just a defensive stopper, going 3-of-3 from beyond the arc to lead the Hawkeyes with 15 points in their 89-63 win over Tanduay.“He’s been practicing his three-point shots,” said coach Boyet Fernandez of the former Ateneo Blue Eagle. “Oping always comes in early to take some extra shots. I’m happy that he made his shots today. Oping is one of my stoppers so if gets those points, it’s just a plus for us.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingAs an ex-pro, all the 6-foot-2 Sumalinog wants is to display his veteran know-hows with Cignal, noting that his leadership is one of the reasons why Fernandez signed him up for the conference.“I want to contribute, especially I’m one of the veterans here. I also want to show leadership to the younger teammates I have who are eyeing to be drafted. I want to share to them what I learned in the PBA,” he said. MOST READ View comments Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next LATEST STORIES Pagasa: Storm intensifies as it nears PAR Roach doesn’t mind who Pacquiao faces nextlast_img read more

first_imgWillian enjoying Chelsea veteran roleby Freddie Taylor25 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea winger Willian is enjoying his different role within the squad this season.The Brazilian is now one of the senior members of the team, given the youth injection from manager Frank Lampard this summer.And Willian is happy to pass on his knowledge to the youngsters. But he insists that he has a lot to offer on the pitch as well. More than anything, he is happy at the club.”I enjoy it a lot,” he said to the club’s website.”I enjoy myself, I enjoy it with my team-mates and I have pleasure to play with them and this is what I want – to have pleasure, play, enjoy myself on the pitch and get the results.” About the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

first_imgQuadree henderson runs with the football during the Military Bowl.The Military Bowl is off to a rousing start on ESPN. Pitt’ freshman wide receiver Quadree Henderson took the opening kickoff at the goal line and jetted 100 yards for a touchdown, giving his team the early lead against Navy. Speed kills. Pitt starts the #MilitaryBowl with a 100-yd kick return for a TD. https://t.co/y7lkwyaK5S— ESPN CollegeFootball (@ESPNCFB) December 28, 2015The touchdown is Henderson’s first kickoff return TD and the second for the Panthers this season. Navy has already tied the score, so it seems like Henderson’s touchdown will be the first of many scores in this contest.last_img read more

first_imgMayor of Montego Bay, Councillor Homer Davis, has hailed the National Solid Waste Management Authority (NSWMA) for its efforts in ridding St. James of solid waste.“The NSWMA has been relentless in making sure that they educate and work with the citizens. In the last two years, we have had some major clean-up (activities) across the parish (which have resulted in the removal) of a lot of bulky waste,” he said.Mayor Davis was speaking at the official opening of the Cambridge garbage holding area in the parish on Friday (January 25).The facility, which currently has four skips, will serve as a central location for the disposal of garbage from around the community.As part of the day’s activities, the Western Parks and Markets (WPM) staff removed bulky waste items from the Cambridge community, which could provide breeding ground for mosquito.Representatives from the Western Regional Health Authority also gave a presentation on how to prevent and destroy mosquito breeding sites in and around the home.last_img read more

first_img Held at Newcastle in St. Andrew in late March, the event saw approximately 1,000 patrons in attendance and was completely sold out. Story Highlights The three-day event, which showcases the rich tradition of coffee production in the Blue Mountain region, was launched last year and featured Blue Mountain coffee, coffee-related products, food stalls, tastings, demonstrations and workshops. The second annual Jamaica Blue Mountain Coffee Festival will be launched at a press conference on January 14. The second annual Jamaica Blue Mountain Coffee Festival will be launched at a press conference on January 15.The three-day event, which showcases the rich tradition of coffee production in the Blue Mountain region, was launched last year and featured Blue Mountain coffee, coffee-related products, food stalls, tastings, demonstrations and workshops.Held at Newcastle in St. Andrew in late March, the event saw approximately 1,000 patrons in attendance and was completely sold out.Chairperson of the Tourism Ministry’s Gastronomy Network, Nicola Madden-Greig, said the festival is part of a strategy to have locals, as well as visitors, exposed to Jamaica Blue Mountain coffee where it is produced.“We will continue to work with the Jamaica Agricultural Commodities Regulatory Authority (JACRA), Jamaica Promotions Corporation (JAMPRO), the Jamaica Tourist Board (JTB) and the Tourism Linkages Network to push the Jamaica Blue Mountain Coffee through our hotels and attractions,” she said.“Most of our gift shops sell it, a lot of our hotels serve it, but we want to see how we can improve on that and grow those numbers,” she added.Mrs. Madden-Grieg was addressing a press conference to launch Jamaica Blue Mountain Coffee Day and to sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), at JAMPRO’S offices in New Kingston, on January 4.The MOU, which was signed by JAMPRO, JACRA and the Jamaica Coffee Exporters Association (JCEA), establishes a formal framework to guide a promotional campaign and marketing strategy to support the Jamaica Blue Mountain and Jamaica High Mountain coffees.To be observed on January 9 by Jamaica and Japan, the Jamaica Blue Mountain Coffee Day is being held in recognition of the formidable relationship forged between the two countries since 1953 when Jamaica sent its first shipment of coffee to the Asian country.It also marks the day the largest shipment of coffee left the port of Kingston en route to Japan in 1967.last_img read more

first_imgMISSISSAUGA, Ont. — One person was killed in a shooting that sent five others to hospital west of Toronto Saturday evening, police said as they hunted for suspects in the case.Circumstances surrounding the incident were scant, but Const. Iryna Yashnyk of the Peel Regional Police say it happened outside an apartment building in a residential area of Mississauga, Ont., just after 6 p.m. One person died at the scene, while five others were taken to hospital with gunshot wounds.“It’s early in the investigation, and it’s still very much an active scene and a dynamic investigation,” Yashnyk told reporters as police officers went door-to-door in the nearby apartment building looking for more victims and potential suspects.She said she didn’t know if the shooting was targeted or if the victims knew the shooter or shooters.Officers didn’t have any suspect information to provide, she said, noting that nobody had been arrested as of 9 p.m. Yashnyk also declined to provide information about the people who were shot.Paramedics, meanwhile, said the person who died was a male, though his age was unknown. Supt. Kyle Johansen of the Peel regional paramedics added that a woman was taken to hospital with life-threatening injuries.He said two of the injured were under the age of 18. A male teenager had serious injuries, he said, as did a girl who was even younger.He said both of them were expected to survive.Numerous police cruisers remained outside the apartment building on Saturday night.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

first_imgAPTN NewsA dead seagull lies in the water with the Long Spruce generating station in the background. APTN News travelled to Treaty 5 Territory in Northern Manitoba to report on the impacts of hydro development on First Nations.  Power Failure: The impacts of hydro on Northern Manitoba. Photo: Justin Brake/APTN Students dig away for artifacts on the Farabout Peninsula on the traditional territory of the Migisi Sahaigan. That’s where a white arrowhead the size of a thumb was uncovered. It could be enough to save the peninsula from clear cutting. Eagle Lake First Nation wants area where artifacts found to be off limits to loggers. Photo: Willow Fiddler/APTN.Summer Bear, 14, is all smiles after travelling from Meadow Lake, Sask., to attend the AboutFace camp at Camp Arnes in Manitoba. According to the organization’s mission statement, the camp is to “promote and enhance positive mental and emotional well-being of individuals with facial differences and their families.” Camp Trailblazers empowers Indigenous and non-Indigenous kids. Photo: Brittany Hobson/APTN Steve Ducharme from O-Pipon-Na-Piwin Cree Nation in Treaty 5 navigates his boat showing APTN reporters Justin Brake and Ashley Brandson the effects the diversion of the Churchill River had on his community. In 1976, the Churchill River water flow was diverted by Hydro into into the Nelson River at Missi Falls which forced the communities to relocate. Photo: Ashley Brandson/APTN Students, leaders and Elders from the Kashechewan First Nation send a message to parliamentarians on their first day back in Ottawa. The community on the shores of James Bay don’t have an adequate school because of constant flooding. Kashechewan students travel to Ottawa with message for politicians Photo: Todd Lamirande/APTN.You can reach us here: news@aptn.ca A fishing boat sits on the shores of Playgreen Lake in Treaty 5 territory. The lake used to provide the Cree people here with a good livelihood but construction of hydro dams along the Churchill and Nelson rivers changed everything. Photo: Justin Brake/APTNcenter_img This black bear cub has been given the name Maskwa (Cree for bear) and was found near death by the side of the road in Grand Cache, Alberta.  She has now recovered and the province wants to release her next month. But the Cochrane Ecological Institute says at eight months, Maskwa is still too young. You posted similar thoughts on our website.  Debate swirls around whether to release young bear back into Alberta’s wild Photo: Cochrane Ecological InstituteFriends of Brittany Martel stand at a vigil on the site where her body was found just outside of Merritt, BC. The RCMP say the case is not suspicious and are waiting for results from the B.C. Coroners Service. Photo: Kathleen Martens/APTN. The Jenpeg generating station changed the lives of hundreds of people when construction started in the 1970s in Treaty 5. Photo: Ashley Brandson/APTN Through hard work Irene Crowchild got sober – and then she got a big golf swing. Crowchild, from the TsuuT’ina Nation in Alberta is the first Indigenous woman to win the Canadian Long Drive Competition and will represent Canada in Mexico this fall. Meet Irene Crowchild who fought for sobriety, and a great golf swing Photo: Tamara Pimentel/APTN.last_img read more