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first_img Kindred marks fastest route to ‘normal trading’ as it delivers H1 growth July 24, 2020 Share Mace launches EQ Connect to solve the industry’s ‘single view’ conundrum on identifying risk  August 10, 2020 Submit The ninth edition of the International Women in Gaming Diversity Awards has taken place at The Savoy Hotel London, with a number of winners lauded throughout the night.Amongst them was Kindred Group, more specifically it’s legal team, who were crowned ‘Team of the Year,’ being recognised as “a team that has delivered change in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion in their company.”Stating that “diversity and equality are key parts of Kindred’s sustainability framework.” which sees it’s legal team consist of 12 employees represented by a 70%-30% female to male split, also consisting of more than seven nationalities, the group states a number of initiatives have been undertaken to drive this area of the business forward.Amongst them was it’s link-up with the All-in Diversity Project, an industry-driven initiative to benchmark diversity, equality and inclusion for the global betting and gaming sector, which it joined as a founding member. Henrik Tjärnström, Chief Executive Officer at Kindred Group, commented: “Equal opportunities lie at the heart of the entire employee journey at Kindred and it remains a key focus for the Group to improve on diversity and equality. “We are proud of the women and men who continue to drive our business forward and this award is a great testament to the hard work our legal team delivers everyday.”Liv Biesemans, Head of Legal Kindred Group, added: “I am extremely happy and proud that my team is recognised with this award. This team’s expertise and dedication drives our business’ success, makes us a true leader in the industry and contributes to Kindred being a great place to work.” Share Unibet backs #GoRacingGreen as lead racing charity  July 28, 2020 StumbleUpon Related Articleslast_img read more

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisTake a look at some of the top headlines and stories trending on social media for July 23.AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisContinue ReadingPrevious Insights into Northeast Michigan: The Democratic Race for the 106th DistrictNext Upcoming Lecture Looks at Early Days of Presque Islelast_img

first_imgLOS ANGELES >> The Dodgers gave infielder Alex Guerrero his release, 10 days after designating him for assignment.Guerrero, 29, is still owed almost $8 million over this season and next. The Dodgers will be on the hook for that amount minus whatever minimum salary Guerrero might receive if another team signs him.One of the top hitters in Cuba, Guerrero was signed to a four-year, $28 million contract by the Dodgers in October 2013 after he defected. Guerrero was expected to replace Mark Ellis as the Dodgers’ primary second baseman in 2014 but his defensive limitations quickly became obvious and he lost a spring competition to Dee Gordon.Guerrero spent most of the 2014 season in Triple-A where he brawled in the dugout with a teammate, catcher Miguel Olivo, during one game. Olivo bit off a large chunk from Guerrero’s left ear during the fight and Guerrero was sidelined for two months following plastic surgery to treat the wound. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error The Cuban did play briefly with the Dodgers in 2014 but reached the height of his utility early last season. He hit .310 with nine home runs and 21 RBIs in his first 87 at-bats while playing third base and left field. But he hit just .182 with only two more home runs the rest of the way and entered this spring with no place in the Dodgers’ plans.Guerrero’s contract did not allow the Dodgers to send him to the minors without his consent and he instead opened this season on the DL with a knee injury. He eventually went on a minor-league injury-rehabilitation assignment where he went 9 for 66 (.136) in 16 games before being released.last_img read more

first_imgPreviousLos Angeles Dodgers relief pitcher Pat Venditte throws during the third inning of a spring training baseball game against the Cleveland Indians, Thursday, March 1, 2018, in Glendale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Dodgers relief pitcher Pat Venditte throws to the plate during a Cactus League game against the Cleveland Indians earlier this month in Glendale, Ariz. Ten years ago, the sport’s only ‘switch pitcher’ forced the creation of a permanent rule. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsLos Angeles Dodgers relief pitcher Pat Venditte throws during a baseball spring exhibition game against the Chicago White Sox, Friday, Feb. 23, 2018, in Glendale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Los Angeles Dodgers relief pitcher Pat Venditte throws during a baseball spring exhibition game against the Chicago White Sox, Friday, Feb. 23, 2018, in Glendale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Los Angeles Dodgers relief pitcher Pat Venditte throws during the third inning of a spring training baseball game against the Cleveland Indians, Thursday, March 1, 2018, in Glendale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)NextShow Caption1 of 4Los Angeles Dodgers relief pitcher Pat Venditte throws during the third inning of a spring training baseball game against the Cleveland Indians, Thursday, March 1, 2018, in Glendale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)ExpandGLENDALE, Ariz. — It isn’t often that the birth of a baseball rule is preserved on video. Such is the beauty of Pat Venditte’s first professional game.Venditte, the Dodgers’ ambidextrous pitcher, was 22 years old when he took the mound on June 19, 2008 for the Staten Island Yankees. When the month began, Venditte was a little-known college pitcher with a novel talent. Soon he would become a YouTube sensation. Accounts of that night’s game against the Brooklyn Cyclones appeared in the major New York papers. The secret of baseball’s only “switch pitcher” was out.Pat McMahon was the Staten Island manager that night. Nearly a decade later, his memory of that warm, clear night on Coney Island remains crisp.“It was a really neat environment, the Yankees against Brooklyn,” McMahon said. “It was a loud, boisterous rivalry game.” Dennis Santana aims to be the Dodgers’ next position player-turned-pitcher The game’s final out has been viewed more than 1.4 million times on YouTube. That’s because Venditte and Brooklyn switch-hitter Ralph Henriquez needed nearly seven minutes to figure out who would get their preferred matchup. Did the pitcher have the final say, or the batter?The fans didn’t seem to know. The broadcasters didn’t know. Critically, neither did home plate umpire Shaylor Smith.Ultimately Smith ordered Henriquez to stand in the right-handed batter’s box. Venditte would be allowed to pitch with his right hand. Henriquez struck out on four pitches, ending the game. It was the last time that Venditte, now 32 and pitching for his fifth organization, had the final say when facing a switch-hitter.“I’m still here pitching,” he said, “so it’s all right.” Kenta Maeda, Kyle Farmer help Dodgers beat Royals The legacy of Venditte’s debut was inevitable. McMahon insists he was firm on the rule before that night, but the protocol wasn’t formalized until afterward, when the Professional Baseball Umpire Corporation consulted with Major League Baseball’s Rules Committee to create the so-called “Pat Venditte Rule.” A switch-pitcher must declare which hand he’s throwing with first, then the batter can step into whichever box he chooses.The consequences played out rather dramatically on Thursday.In the Dodgers’ Cactus League game against the Cleveland Indians, Venditte had the misfortune of facing Francisco Lindor and Jose Ramirez in the same inning. In retrospect, Venditte said he had never faced two more talented switch hitters in one outing.Lindor, batting left-handed, hit a home run. Ramirez, batting right-handed, flew out to deep center field.Related Articles With one famous exception, Venditte has never enjoyed the advantage over a switch-hitter. Now he merely takes it for granted.“Every time I go into a series, there’s switch-hitters,” Venditte said. “It’s not something I really think about in a negative way. It’s just a way I have to go about facing the hitters. You try to go through things in your head about how you’re going to get those guys out and just be ready for any situation.”McMahon, the Yankees’ director of international player development, believes that Venditte’s debut game offered another lesson that can’t be overlooked. The rookie pitcher had about seven minutes to lose his cool. He never did.After the game, McMahon said, “I brought him in and I wanted him to know how proud I was of him – most of all of the way he handled it in a first-class manner with tremendous principles. It was a huge check of his makeup, his character, and his competitiveness.”ALSODodgers pitcher Kenley Jansen was scratched from his scheduled Cactus League debut when he felt some tightness in his upper right hamstring warming up. Manager Dave Roberts said the injury wasn’t serious and that Jansen would not need an MRI. … Jansen is scheduled to pitch in a “B” game Monday at Camelback Ranch. … Roberts didn’t want to formalize his plans for the season-opening starting rotation, but the Dodgers’ five top starters have already established a predictable order behind opening day starter Clayton Kershaw: Alex Wood, Kenta Maeda, Rich Hill and Hyun-Jin Ryu. “As it stands right now you can read between the lines,” Roberts said. … Utility player Max Muncy suffered a strained oblique and will be down “a few days,” according to the manager. When will Dodgers’ prospect Walker Buehler be ready to blossom? Dodgers poised to use their stash of starter/relievers in 2018 Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more