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first_imgSolskjaer expects attacking boost from injured Man Utd starsby Ansser Sadiq18 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveOle Gunnar Solskjaer expects Manchester United to improve when their attacking players return from injury.Anthony Martial and Paul Pogba were both absent as United lost 1-0 to Newcastle United at St. James’ Park on Sunday.Speaking after the game, Solskjaer lamented about his lack of attacking options.He said: “[The lack of chances] is symptomatic of where we are at at the moment. “We’re working hard, we stick together as a team but we don’t create. “You can say, as you started, that we have loads of injuries and loads of players away and there are some attacking players away of course. “We hope and expect them to come back firing on all cylinders.” About the authorAnsser SadiqShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

first_imgQuadree henderson runs with the football during the Military Bowl.The Military Bowl is off to a rousing start on ESPN. Pitt’ freshman wide receiver Quadree Henderson took the opening kickoff at the goal line and jetted 100 yards for a touchdown, giving his team the early lead against Navy. Speed kills. Pitt starts the #MilitaryBowl with a 100-yd kick return for a TD. https://t.co/y7lkwyaK5S— ESPN CollegeFootball (@ESPNCFB) December 28, 2015The touchdown is Henderson’s first kickoff return TD and the second for the Panthers this season. Navy has already tied the score, so it seems like Henderson’s touchdown will be the first of many scores in this contest.last_img read more

first_imgMichigan football players run under the "Go Blue" banner before a home game.ANN ARBOR, MI – SEPTEMBER 13: Quarterback Devin Gardner #98 of the Michigan Wolverines leads the team onto the field prior to the start of the game against the Miami University Redhawks at Michigan Stadium on September 13, 2014 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. the Wolverines defeated the Redhawks 34-10. (Photo by Leon Halip/Getty Images)Michigan officially becomes a Nike school next month. The Wolverines, previously with adidas, signed a $173 million deal with The Swoosh earlier this year than runs through 2027. The contract begins on Aug. 1. As part of the deal, Michigan’s football program will be wearing the Jordan logo. All of the Wolverines’ gear – jerseys, pants, sideline apparel, etc. – will have the Jumpman logo. Today, we got a sneak peek at some of Michigan’s new gear, including a color, “Amarillo,” that Nike specially developed for the Wolverines. Michigan will be the only college program to wear this shade of yellow. Here’s a look, from ESPN’s Darren Rovell. Nike will go back to the more traditional yellow for Michigan. Here’s a comparison of adidas yellow vs Nike pic.twitter.com/KTQHQPXKMp— Darren Rovell (@darrenrovell) July 20, 2016MLive.com’s Nick Baumgardner says that the “Amarillo” sweatshirt with the Jumpman logo on one shoulder and the Block M on the other will be Jim Harbaugh’s official sideline shirt. This (but in blue and w/ a thin M) is Jim Harbaugh’s new coaching shirt. He designed it. pic.twitter.com/8ID6UFE44K— Nick Baumgardner (@nickbaumgardner) July 20, 2016You can view more details of Michigan’s new gear here.last_img read more

first_imgTULSA, Okla. — A Chinese national employed by an Oklahoma petroleum company has been charged with stealing trade secrets.Federal prosecutors in Tulsa said Friday that 35-year-old Hongjin Tan is accused of stealing trade secrets from his unnamed U.S.-based employer that operates a research facility in the Tulsa area.An affidavit filed by the FBI alleges that Tan stole trade secrets about an unidentified product worth more than $1 billion to his employer to benefit a Chinese company where Tan had been offered work.Authorities say Tan allegedly downloaded hundreds of computer files regarding the manufacture of a “research and development downstream energy market product.”Court records show Tan made an initial appearance before a federal magistrate Thursday and remains in custody. A preliminary and detention hearing is scheduled next week.The Associated Presslast_img read more

first_imgTAYLOR, B.C. — Once again, YRB North Peace is going to be doing welding operations on the metal deck of the Taylor Bridge this week.Welding operations will be taking place tonight and tomorrow night between 7:00 p.m. and 3:30 a.m. During these times, the bridge will be reduced to single-lane alternating traffic with delays of up to 20 minutes in both directions directed by a pilot vehicle. YRB asks motorists using the bridge during these times to drive with caution, as there will be a large number of working personnel and equipment.YRB is apologizing for any inconvenience the work may cause. Updates on this and other road work can be found online at DriveBC.ca. For questions or concerns, or to report a load that is 3.6 metres or wider that is scheduled to cross the bridge during welding, please contact YRB’s office toll-free at 1-888-883-6688. You can also follow YRB on Twitter.last_img read more

first_imgVANCOUVER, B.C. — Kim and Susan Gamble from Dawson Creek have been announced as the winners of the Lotto 6/49 Guaranteed Prize from the draw on April 28th.Kim and Susan purchased the winning ticket at the 7-Eleven in Dawson Creek. sometime between Thursday and Saturday evening. The couple says that the reality of their win is sinking in as they share the news with more of their friends and family. They said that their winnings will go towards new home renovations and a trip to Hawaii.“We heard there was a winning ticket sold in Dawson Creek so I decided to check my ticket on the Lotto App,” said Kim. “As soon as I scanned it, I instantly froze up and was speechless.” “I didn’t know what Kim was looking at so I popped my head over to see the app and instantly froze up too,” said Susan. “It was a speechless moment frozen in time. It’s hard to explain the shock but we just couldn’t believe our eyes.”In addition to the $1 million prize, the April 28th draw featured 50 additional guaranteed prizes, seven of which were won in B.C.last_img read more

first_imgPolls suggest the Liberals and Conservatives are running neck-and-neck, while the NDP and Greens are fighting for third.The NDP are launching their campaign today in London, Ont., one of the regions of the province they feel they’ll be able to hold onto seats. The Greens are in their own comfort zone of British Columbia, where Elizabeth May will launch her campaign in Victoria.At the dissolution of Parliament, the Liberals hold 177 seats, the Conservatives 95, the NDP 39, the Bloc 10 and the Greens 2. There are eight independents — including former Liberal cabinet ministers Jane Philpott and Jody Wilson-Raybould. The People’s Party of Canada has one seat and former New Democrat Erin Weir sits as a member of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation. Five seats are vacant.Under the law, the election must be Oct. 21. Trudeau’s plan calls for him to fly immediately to British Columbia for a rally in the NDP-held riding of Vancouver-Kingsway.Haunting Trudeau on the trail will be the SNC-Lavalin scandal, given fresh life this morning after the Globe and Mail reported the RCMP’s investigation into potential obstruction of justice in the matter has been stymied by the shroud of cabinet confidence.Asked what his government is hiding, Trudeau says his office gave the largest waiver of cabinet confidences in Canadian history but added anything more.Before jumping on his own campaign plane this morning, a fired-up Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer said the story showcases his belief that Trudeau has lost the moral authority to govern.“Over the next five weeks I will be explaining the reasons why Justin Trudeau has lost that authority and our alternative plan,” he said in French.Scheer will spend Day 1 of the campaign in Quebec and Ontario. OTTAWA — Justin Trudeau has kicked off his bid for re-election after emerging from Rideau Hall to ask Gov. Gen. Julie Payette to dissolve Parliament.With that starts a 40-day campaign that will see the Liberal leader make the pitch to Canadians that he should be given a second term.He says that the election is a chance for Canadians to vote for the kind of Canada they want to live in.last_img read more

first_imgBut whereas the cerebral Pierre Trudeau hated the back-slapping, baby-kissing, retail side of politics, English says his son seems to feed off the energy he derives from engaging directly with people. Liberal strategists are counting on him out-perform his rivals on the hustings.The latest Liberal slogan — “Choose Forward” — appeals to Canadians to continue supporting the party’s general direction, implicitly acknowledging that not everyone is entirely satisfied with some of the particulars. It attempts to frame the election as a choice between going forward or backward, not as a referendum on Trudeau’s first four years.As Trudeau put it in the interview: “I think people get that there is a choice in this election, that it’s not about judging me on everything you’d hoped I’d do and where I might not have fulfilled all everyone’s individual hopes for what this could be.”According to strategists, the key to victory is framing the election as a binary choice between the Liberals and Conservatives. In other words, forget about those New Democrats and Greens, whom Liberals intend to mention as little as possible even while emphasizing the values and policies they share. OTTAWA — Canada’s 2019 federal election could wind up looking a lot like the 1972 cliffhanger — the last time a Trudeau asked Canadians for a second mandate after the first blush of Trudeaumania had dissipated.But if Liberals play their cards right, party strategists are hoping it will end up more like a replay of 2015, with Canadians choosing to continue moving forward with Justin Trudeau’s progressive agenda rather than going back to the bad old days of Stephen Harper’s Conservatives.Never mind that Harper is no longer Conservative leader. His successor, Andrew Scheer, is, by his own admission, “Stephen Harper with a smile” and his agenda, by the Liberals’ telling, is Harper’s agenda: tax breaks for the wealthy, cuts in services for everyone else, no action on climate change, the politics of fear and division. They’ll reinforce that message by tying Scheer wherever possible to someone else who isn’t running: Ontario’s unpopular Progressive Conservative premier, Doug Ford. And they’ll no doubt throw in, at least obliquely, references to mercurial U.S. President Donald Trump.Here’s how Trudeau himself framed the choice in a recent interview:“We are on a very good path and we need to continue it because we see what happens elsewhere in the world when people make poor choices. Hell, we’re seeing in Ontario what happens with cuts to services and tax breaks for the rich,” he said.“I mean, it doesn’t work and that’s the big thing that we turned around (in 2015). We said no, you don’t grow an economy through trickle-down, you grow it through investing in people, investing in their communities. That was the big disagreement we had with the Conservatives in 2015 and it remains the big disagreement we have with them in 2019.”At the moment, however, polls suggest the Liberals are essentially tied with the Conservatives, with neither in a position to capture a majority of seats in the House of Commons. Should that hold, the outcome could be very similar to 1972, when the Liberals under Trudeau’s father Pierre wound up with the barest of minorities, just two seats ahead of the Progressive Conservatives.There are, says historian and former Liberal MP John English, some “really striking parallels” between Trudeau senior’s bid for a second term and that of his eldest son. Both swept to power on a wave of adulation rarely seen in Canadian politics, creating unrealistic expectations that crashed against the hard rock of reality during four years of governing. At the same time, Liberals need to motivate progressive voters to back Trudeau again. They can’t afford to let disappointed progressives — turned off by Trudeau buying a petroleum pipeline or scrapping his promise to end Canada’s first-past-the-post electoral system or the SNC-Lavalin ethics imbroglio, for instance  — to drift over to the NDP or Greens, or just stay home. Robust turnout will be crucial, as it was in 2015 when young voters turned out in droves to support the Liberals.Liberals are under no illusions they’ll be able to replicate the enthusiasm that attended Trudeau’s debut election. But they’ll emphasize what they say is at stake if the Conservatives win, reversing all the progress that’s been made on everything from climate change to gender equality and gay rights — a tactic evident in the interview with Trudeau.“Just across the country, seeing conservative premiers elected from the Rockies to the Bay of Fundy, who are trying to turn back the clock on the fight against climate change. I mean people are like, whoa, there is a lot at stake,” he said.While national poll numbers suggest a dead heat with the Conservatives, regional results tend to favour the Liberals in areas with lots of seats, such as Ontario and Quebec. They expect to lose MPs in the Prairies and know they’re unlikely to sweep all 32 seats in the Atlantic provinces as they did in 2015, although they hope to hang onto most. What will happen in British Columbia, where a four-way fight among Liberals, Conservatives, NDP and Greens is playing out, is unpredictable.But Liberals are still hoping to offset some of those losses with gains in Central Canada, which accounts for almost 60 per cent of the 338 seats up for grabs, capitalizing on Ford’s unpopularity in Ontario and the collapse of the NDP in Quebec.KEYS TO VICTORY:— Frame the election as a binary choice between forward-looking Liberals and backward-looking Conservatives.— Paint Scheer as a clone of Stephen Harper and a yes-man to conservative premiers, particularly Ontario’s unpopular Doug Ford.— Motivate disappointed progressive voters to back Trudeau once again by emphasizing that all the progress made, however imperfect, would be reversed if the Conservatives win.— Pick up seats in Ontario and Quebec to offset inevitable losses elsewhere.— Ensure Justin Trudeau is at the top of his game. Joan Bryden, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

first_imgNearly a decade before the National Institution for Transforming India or the NITI Aayog envisaged private partnership in rural healthcare, a PPP-run hospital in Gujarat’s Kutch district – India’s largest – has transformed hundreds of lives. The Adani Foundation-run Gujarat Adani Institute of Medical Sciences (GAIMS) in Bhuj was ostensibly India’s maidensuccessfully operating PPP model in the healthcare sector. From earthquake rubble to a state-of-the-art hospital that caters to more than 1000, patients a day, it’s a historic journey of community empowerment and nation building. Over the years, the successful model has contributed in creating confidence which led to rollout plans of six brownfield self-financed medical colleges in Tapi, Dahod, Panchmahals, Banaskantha, Bharuch and Amreli districts by upgrading the government hospitals through PPP. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’Its healthy ripple effects can now be felt at the national level. Last year, the NITI Aayog also accepted the merits of the model and invited private players to partner with government hospitals at the district level. The government approached many corporates such as Narayana Hrudalaya and Manipal Education to adopt the hospital on PPP basis. But none of the proposals worked owing to feasibility challenges. Since 2009, when the Adani Group entered into a PPP partnership, the group invested a Capex of around Rs100 crore in ramping up infrastructure among other things. A decade since then the cumulative operating deficit stands at 25 crore. Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&K “Adani G K General Hospital caters specifically to the healthcare needs of the poor and marginalized sections of the society. People from special and deserving categories receive further specialized and free IPD services. In addition, the hospital also connects people with various government schemes such as AyushmanYojana, MA Yojana, students’ healthcare programme etc.” said Vasant Gadhavi, Director Administration, GAIMS Sea change in hospital infrastructure and human capital GAIMS always had fairly robust infrastructure. But considering the massive geography of the Kutch region it needed consistent upgradation – something that became a seamless process following the private partnership. From Outdoor Patient Wards to the Operation Theatres and Labour Rooms to Intensive Care Units, every critical aspect of the hospital infrastructure grew manifolds (see table 1 below for details). Likewise every specialised treatment such as Dermatology, Psychiatry, Paediatric, Surgery, Orthopaedic, Ophthalmology, and ENT among others recorded rapid augmentation from time to time. Retaining quality talent pool in remote locations has been one of the key challenges for most sectors and pressure is even worse for healthcare. However, the hospital management did a remarkable job in building a team of top line medical experts. Medical officers, nurses, technicians and the outsourced team of support were deployed at par with growing patients’ footfalls in the region. Establishment of GAIMS Medical College While the pillars of the hospital facilities became stronger, the PPP-model also anchored the establishment of the GAIMS Medical College in 2009. Today the medical college offers 150 seats for under-graduate courses and 51 seats for post graduate courses. Specialisations offered at the facility comprise Physiology, General Surgery, Anatomy, ENT, Microbiology, Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Respiratory Medicines, Orthopaedics, Dermatology, Ophthalmology, Pathology, Paediatrics, Radiology and Anaesthesiology; thus creating dependable pool of talented doctors to service ailing patients of Kutch. Improving health indicators Health indicators have improved remarkably following the takeover. For instance, the number of OPDs nearly tripled from 1, 39,199 in 2014-15 to 3, 17,361 in 2017-18. Likewise there has been steady rise in child births as well. From catering to just over 2000 deliveries in 2014-15 the number rose by nearly 35% in 2017-18. At the same time a combination of preventive and curative measures has ensured that the infant mortality rate has been brought down from 5.62% in 2014-15 to 3.65% in 2018-19 (April-January).last_img read more

A late surge was not enough for the No. 8 Ohio State men’s lacrosse team against Notre Dame Wednesday. The team lost for the second time this season, 9-4, against the No. 3-ranked Fighting Irish in South Bend, Ind. After an early first period goal from sophomore attacker Reegan Comeault that tied the game, 1-1, the Buckeyes failed to find the back of the net again until the beginning of the fourth quarter. In the meantime, the Notre Dame scored five goals of its own to take a 6-1 lead into the fourth quarter. Despite an OSU comeback that saw three goals within six minutes, the Buckeyes could not dig themselves out of their hole, as the Fighting Irish scored a goal after each of OSU’s to end the game, 9-4. OSU was outshot by Notre Dame 42-27 on the day, an opponent season high. The Buckeyes’ four goals against the Fighting Irish marked a season low for the typically high-scoring offense. Before Wednesday, OSU hadn’t scored less than seven goals in a game since March 3, 2012, against Penn State, when the Buckeyes lost, 5-2. Senior attacker Logan Schuss added to his point streak of 52 games with an assist to sophomore midfielder Jesse King with five minutes remaining in the game. The road loss comes after OSU upset then-No. 9 Virginia, 11-10, on Saturday in Charlottesville, Va. Junior midfielder Michael Italiano was named Eastern College Athletic Conference specialist of the week on Monday for his performance against the Cavaliers with eight ground balls. Italiano had five more against the Irish Wednesday. OSU split its string of four games against top-10 teams, 2-2, bringing the team’s overall record to 5-2. The Buckeyes are set to play against Bellarmine on Saturday at 7 p.m. in Louisville, Ky., before they return home to host the defending national champion, No. 6 Loyola Maryland, a week later. read more